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Just Security Blog Launch

September 25, 2013

Just security blog

To celebrate its official launch Just Security hosted an event at NYU Washington, DC. The event included a roundtable discussion on national security leaks and the press entitled, “When Reporting is a Crime: National Security and the Press After Snowden and Sterling,” with welcoming remarks from Ryan Goodman and Steve Vladeck, Co-Editors-in-Chief of Just Security.

Just Security officially launched on Monday, September 23, 2013 at www.justsecurity.org.

Just Security is a new online platform that will provide a forum for high-level discussion of law, rights, and U.S. national security. Drawing primarily from the blog’s Board of Editors but also Guest Posts, the first few weeks will feature: individuals with significant U.S. government experience like Harold Koh and Ambassador Cameron Munter; civil society attorneys like Shaheed Fatima (U.K.) and Hina Shamsi (U.S.); law professors like Orin Kerr and Michael Schmitt; and other leading voices like Jennifer Granick, Luis Moreno Ocampo and Julian Sanchez. Just Security’s primary target audience and readership includes governmental officials and legislators, foreign policy experts, and journalists who work on U.S. national security and international affairs. Just Security will provide balanced and broad perspectives that include: constitutional analyses of major legislation and Executive actions; information about the impact of U.S. national security policies inside foreign countries; and scrutiny of international legal developments that could affect U.S. actions. Just Security’s objective is to promote principled and pragmatic solutions to the most pressing national security problems that decision-makers face and aims to become a “must-read” for individuals inside and outside of the government who work on U.S. national security.


Watch the program ...


Bob Corn-Revere

Bob Corn-Revere

Gabriel Schoenfeld

Gabriel Schoenfeld

Lucy Dalglish

Lucy Dalglish

Steve Vladeck

Steve Vladeck

Charlie Savage

Charlie Savage

Kenneth Wainstein

Kenneth Wainstein

For more information on Just Security, including the latest news regarding the launch, please follow them on Twitter (@just_security) and join the conversation on Facebook (www.facebook.com/JSBlog).

Just Security will be based at New York University School of Law.



Dahlia Lithwick

Dahlia Lithwick

(Moderator)

Dahlia Lithwick is a senior editor and legal correspondent for Slate, writes the column "Supreme Court Dispatches" and has covered the Microsoft trial and other legal issues.

Before joining Slate, she worked for a family law firm in Reno, Nev., and clerked for Procter Hug, chief justice of the ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1996. Her work has appeared in the New Republic, Commentary, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Elle and on CNN.com. She is a weekly legal commentator for the NPR show, Day to Day.

She is co-author of "Me v. Everybody: Absurd Contracts for an Absurd World" (Workman Publishing, 2003), a legal humor book, and "I Will Sing Life: Voices from the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp" (Little, Brown & Co., 1992), a book about seven children from Paul Newman's camp who have life-threatening illnesses.

Ms. Lithwick was awarded the Online News Association's award for online commentary in 2001. She received a B.A degree in English from Yale University in 1990 and a J.D degree from Stanford Law School in 1996.


Bob Corn-Revere

Bob Corn-Revere has extensive experience in First Amendment law and communications, media and information technology law. He regularly counsels clients and serves as litigation counsel in communications and Internet-related matters. Bob speaks and writes extensively on First Amendment and communications policy issues.

Bob also successfully petitioned Governor George E. Pataki to grant the first posthumous pardon in New York history, to the late comedian Lenny Bruce in a landmark pro bono case. Read the pardon petition.

Representative clients include: A&E Television Networks, American Association of Advertising Agencies, Association of National Advertisers, American Advertising Federation, CBS Corporation, Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, ICM Registry, LodgeNet, Inc., Mark Burnett Productions, Motion Picture Association of America, Texas Entertainment Association, and Viacom.


Lucy Dalglish

Lucy A. Dalglish became Dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland on August 1, 2012.

She served as executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press from 2000 to 2012. The Reporters Committee is a voluntary, unincorporated association of reporters and news editors dedicated to protecting the First Amendment interests of the news media. Based in Arlington, Va., the Reporters Committee has provided research, guidance and representation in major press cases in state and federal courts since 1970.

Prior to assuming the Reporters Committee position, Dalglish was a media lawyer for almost five years in the trial department of the Minneapolis law firm of Dorsey & Whitney.

From 1980 to 1993, Dalglish was a reporter and editor at the St. Paul Pioneer Press. As a reporter, she covered beats ranging from general assignment and suburbs to education and courts. During her last three years at the Pioneer Press, she served as night city editor, assistant news editor and national/ foreign editor.

Dalglish was awarded the Kiplinger Award by the National Press Foundation in 2012 for her service to journalism. She also was awarded the Wells Memorial Key, the highest honor bestowed by the Society of Professional Journalists, in 1995. A year later, she was one of 24 journalists, lawyers, lawmakers, educators, researchers, librarians and historians inducted into the charter class of the National Freedom of Information Act Hall of Fame in Washington, D.C.

Dalglish appears frequently in print, online and broadcast stories about issues involving the media and the First Amendment. She has been a national leader in supporting open meeting and open records laws at the state and federal level, as well as a key player over the past 10 years in the effort to pass state and federal reporters “shield laws.” She serves on the boards or advisory committees of the National Freedom of Information Coalition, the National Center for Courts and the Media, the Sunshine in Government Initiative, Openthegovernment.org, and the Virginia Coalition for Open Government.

She has spoken recently before journalists, lawyers, judges and citizen groups in Washington, D.C., New York, Nashville, Reno, Las Vegas, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Austin, Eugene, Houston, San Diego, Orlando, Honolulu, Long Beach, Seattle, Tacoma, Philadelphia, Albany, Boston, Phoenix, Atlanta, Kansas City and Denver.

Dalglish earned a juris doctor degree from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1995; a master of studies in law degree from Yale Law School in 1988; and a bachelor of arts in journalism from the University of North Dakota in 1980. While attending UND, Dalglish worked as managing editor of the Dakota Student and as a reporter and editor for the Grand Forks Herald. She lives in McLean, Va., with her husband, Mark McNair.


Charlie Savage

Charles Savage is a Washington correspondent for The New York Times. He is known for his work on presidential power and other legal policy matters.

Before joining The Times, Mr. Savage covered national legal affairs for the Boston Globe from 2003 to 2008. He received a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2007 for his coverage of presidential signing statements for the Globe. Other awards he earned while at the Globe include the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award and the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency.

Mr. Savage's book about the growth of executive power, “Takeover: The Return of the Imperial Presidency and the Subversion of American Democracy,” was named one of the best books of 2007 by both Slate and Esquire. The book also received the bipartisan Constitution Project's inaugural Award for Constitutional Commentary, the NCTE George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution to Honesty and Clarity in Public Language and the New York Public Library's Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism.

Mr. Savage was born and raised in Fort Wayne, Indiana. He graduated summa cum laude with degrees in English and American literature from Harvard College in 1998. In 2003, he earned a master's degree from Yale Law School, where he was a Knight Journalism Fellow. Mr. Savage got his start as a local government and politics reporter for the Miami Herald.

Mr. Savage currently lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife, Luiza Ch. Savage, and their two sons, William and Peter.


Gabriel Schoenfeld

Gabriel Schoenfeld is a Senior Fellow at Hudson Institute and is the author, most recently, of Necessary Secrets: National Security, the Media, and the Rule of Law published by W.W. Norton. Schoenfeldwrites frequently on national security and intelligence for the Wall Street Journal and the Weekly Standard. His op-eds, book reviews, and articles have also appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Post, Commentary, the New Republic, the Atlantic Monthly, the National Interest, the New Leader, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Der Spiegel, and the Asahi Shimbun. He has appeared as a guest commentator on the major broadcast and cable television networks, including ABC's Nightline, PBS's Jim Lehrer News Hour, CNN, CBS, Fox News, the Wall Street Journal Report with Paul Gigot, CBC (Canada), NHK (Japan), and numerous radio programs. From December 2010 through November 2012, Schoenfeld was a Senior Adviser to the Mitt Romney for President Campaign. From 1994 to 2008, he was senior editor of Commentary. Before joining Commentary in 1994, Schoenfeld was a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., where he founded the research bulletin Soviet Prospects. Schoenfeld served on the staff of Daniel Patrick Moynihan during his first term in the United States Senate. In 1986 he was a temporary Foreign Service Officer in the USSR (stationed in Irkutsk, Tbilisi, and Tashkent) with the United States Information Agency. Schoenfeld earned a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College, was an IREX Scholar at Moscow State University, and holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University's government department.


Steve Vladeck

Stephen I. Vladeck is a Professor of Law and the Associate Dean for Scholarship at American University Washington College of Law. His teaching and research focus on federal jurisdiction, constitutional law, national security law, and international criminal law. A nationally recognized expert on the role of the federal courts in the war on terrorism, he was part of the legal team that successfully challenged the Bush Administration's use of military tribunals at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, 548 U.S. 557 (2006), and has co-authored party and amicus briefs in a host of other major lawsuits, many of which have challenged the U.S. government’s surveillance and detention of terrorism suspects. Vladeck, who is a co-editor of Aspen Publishers’ leading national security and counterterrorism law casebooks, has authored reports on related topics for a wide range of organizations, including the First Amendment Center, the Constitution Project, and the ABA’s Standing Committee on Law and National Security.

Professor Vladeck has won awards for his teaching, his scholarship, and his service to the law school. He is a member of the American Law Institute, a senior editor of the peer-reviewed Journal of National Security Law and Policy, a senior contributor to the Lawfare blog, the Chair-Elect of the Section on Federal Courts of the Association of American Law Schools, the Supreme Court Fellow at the Constitution Project, and a fellow at the Center on National Security at Fordham University School of Law.

A 2004 graduate of Yale Law School, Vladeck clerked for the Honorable Marsha S. Berzon on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and the Honorable Rosemary Barkett on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. While a law student, he was Executive Editor of the Yale Law Journal and the Student Director of the Balancing Civil Liberties & National Security Post-9/11 Litigation Project, and he was awarded the Potter Stewart Prize for Best Team Performance in Moot Court and the Harlan Fiske Stone Prize for Outstanding Moot Court Oralist. He earned a B.A. summa cum laude with Highest Distinction in History and Mathematics from Amherst College in 2001, where he wrote his senior thesis on "Leipzig's Shadow: The War Crimes Trials of the First World War and Their Implications from Nuremberg to the Present."


Kenneth Wainstein

Kenneth L. Wainstein is Co-Chair of the firm's Business Fraud group. He focuses his practice on corporate internal investigations and civil and criminal enforcement proceedings. With a record of sustained accomplishment in significant positions in the U.S. government in the areas of criminal enforcement and national security, he brings clients a deep understanding of the substantive and procedural issues involved in white collar defense. His 20 years of public service have garnered him an intimate knowledge of Justice Department policy, extensive crisis management skills, credibility among prosecutors and regulators, and strong relationships with Congress, the District of Columbia bench and bar, and U.S. Attorneys around the country.

In 2008, after 19 years at the Justice Department, Ken was named Homeland Security Advisor by President George W. Bush. In this capacity, he coordinated the nation's counterterrorism, homeland security, infrastructure protection, and disaster response and recovery efforts. He advised the President, convened and chaired meetings of the Cabinet Officers on the Homeland Security Council, and oversaw the inter-agency coordination process for homeland security and counterterrorism programs.

Prior to his White House service, Ken was twice nominated and confirmed for leadership positions in the Justice Department. In 2006, the U.S. Senate confirmed Ken as the first Assistant Attorney General for National Security. In that position, Ken established and led the new National Security Division, which consolidated DOJ's law enforcement and intelligence activities on counterterrorism and counterintelligence matters, and also oversaw the Department's role in regulatory mechanisms such as the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS). Ken led several national security initiatives, including the launch of the national, inter-agency Export Control Enforcement Initiative targeting illegal exports of sensitive technology and weapons components.

In 2004, he was appointed, and later confirmed as, the United States Attorney in Washington, DC, where he oversaw the investigation and prosecution of high-profile white-collar and public corruption cases, including the case against Riggs Bank for Bank Secrecy Act violations and the prosecution of the MZM Chief Executive Officer for paying bribes to former Congressman Randall "Duke" Cunningham. Prior to that, Ken served as General Counsel of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and then as Chief of Staff to Director Robert S. Mueller. At the FBI, Ken was involved in myriad sensitive national security and criminal enforcement matters, as well as a variety of civil litigation, managerial, and Congressional oversight issues. In 2001, Ken was appointed Director of the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys, where he provided oversight and support to the 94 U.S. Attorneys' Offices.
From 1989 to 2001, Ken served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in both the Southern District of New York and the District of Columbia, where he handled numerous prosecutions, trying 25 jury trials and arguing over a dozen appellate arguments.

Ken maintains a Top Secret clearance. Ken is also frequently recognized for his work, recently being named one of Washington's "Top Lawyers" in the national security field by Washingtonian magazine. Over the course of his career, he has received the Edmund J. Randolph Award for Outstanding Service to the Department of Justice, the Department of Justice Director's Award for Superior Performance, and the Lawyer of the Year Award from the Bar Association of the District of Columbia. Ken has served as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center since 2009, teaching National Security Investigations and Litigation. He is a member of the Director’s Advisory Board of the National Counterterrorism Center; a member of the CIA General Counsel's External Advisory Board; a member of the Webster Commission on the FBI, Counterterrrorism Intelligence, and the Fort Hood Shootings; the Co-chair of the Committee on National Security Law, Policy & Practice of the District of Columbia Bar Association; a member of the Council on Foreign Relations; a member of the steering committee of the George Washington University Homeland Security Policy Institute; and a member of the Board of Directors of the National Association of Former United States Attorneys.


Ken earned his B.A. from the University of Virginia, with high distinction and Phi Beta Kappa. He earned his J.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, where he was a moot court board member and the Note and Comment Editor of the California Law Review. Following law school, Ken served as law clerk to the Honorable Thomas Penfield Jackson of the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

 


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