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Archival Objects and What They Tell Us

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This event focused on archival research and resources available in DC for researchers at any stage, undergraduate or graduate.

The panel provided concrete guidance for students and researchers interested in utilizing DC based archives for their research projects, from undergraduate theses to doctoral dissertations. Participants learned what materials exist where and how students of multiple disciplines can apply the extensive resources at DC based archives to execute original primary research.

This event was held jointly at NYU's Washington Square Campus and at NYU Washington, DC.


Panelists


David Ludden

David Ludden is Professor of Political Economy and Globalization and Chair of the Department of History at New York University. He first worked in South Asia in 1968, as a public health intern, and in graduate school he moved into Tamil literature and development studies, doing translations of ancient Tamil poetry and research in agrarian economic and social history. In 1978, he received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Pennsylvania, where he served on the faculty from 1981 until 2007. He was chair of South Asia programs at Penn, at the Social Science Research Council, and at the Fulbright Senior Scholars program (CIES). In 2002, he served as President of the Association for Asian Studies. His research concerns histories of development and globalization. Until 1993, he focused on southern India. Then he moved his work into Bangladesh and northeast India. His publications include four edited volumes, three monographs, and over 50 academic articles and chapters, whose overarching theme is the comparative history of capitalism, particularly in agrarian settings and as it concerns inequality, poverty, conflict, and social movements. His current writing is slowly adding up to a book that is now called History Inside Globalization: Spatial Power and Inequity in Asia, which focuses on the reproduction and transformation of imperial forms of knowledge, power, authority, and inequity inside the world of nations under globalization. Since 2007, he has launched new programs to foster interdisciplinary research on South Asia and globalization at NYU. He has organized a network of faculty collaboration called SouthAsia@NYU, an annual Global South Asia Conference (since 2008), The Global Café and Global Seminar Dissertation Workshops, all anchored by the Institute for Public Knowledge, where he is a Senior Fellow. http://history.fas.nyu.edu/object/davidludden


Kathleen Lynch

Kathleen Lynch is Executive Director of the Folger Institute, a position she has held since 1996. As such, she is responsible for organizing the seminars, workshops, and other formal programs for scholars at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Her research interests include the intertwined histories of regulations of religion and the book trade. Among her published articles are “Into Jail and into Print: John Bunyan Writes the Godly Self” in the Huntington Library Quarterly’s special issue on Prison Writing, edited by William H. Sherman and William J. Sheils (2009); “Staging New Worlds: Place and Le Theatre de Neptune” in the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (2008); and “Devotion Bound: A Social History of The Temple,” in Books and Readers in Early Modern England, Ed. Jennifer Andersen and Elizabeth Sauer (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001). Her book, Protestant Autobiography in the Seventeenth-Century Anglophone World, was recently published with Oxford University Press (spring 2012).


John Powers

For thirteen years, John Powers worked as an Archivist, Supervisory Archivist and Acting Director of the Nixon Presidential Materials Project at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland, and served as the subject area expert on the Nixon Presidency for the National Archives. While his primary responsibility was to listen to and declassify the Nixon White House tapes for public access, he also archivally processed several textual collections, including the Kissinger Telephone Conversations Transcripts, and provided extensive reference service to the public.

He is the author of “The History of Presidential Audio Recordings and the Archival Issues Surrounding their Use,” which details the secret taping systems of Presidents Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon. He has lectured at several universities and numerous professional conferences. He has also spoken about the Nixon and Johnson tapes on National Public Radio, the History Channel, C-SPAN, and the Discovery Channel.

In addition to the Nixon Library, he has worked in the Office of Presidential Libraries and at the Lyndon B. Johnson Library, reviewing LBJ’s tapes for public access. In 2002, he served as a member of the Ad Hoc Preservation Steering Committee studying the feasibility of recovery of lost sound on the famous 18 ½ minute gap tape.

At present, he serves as a senior program analyst in the Information Security Oversight Office and is responsible for monitoring and evaluating declassification programs within the Executive branch. In this role, he created a new program designed to measure the results of Executive branch declassification review programs. He also serves as the primary lead in providing support to the Public Interest Declassification Boar. They were tasked by the President to develop recommendations to modernize the national security classification system.

He received a B.A. in International Relations from the College of William and Mary in 1989 and a M.A. in American History from George Mason University in 1999 and is a member of Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society.


Dr. Robert Williams

Dr. Robert Williams oversees the development of new scholarly research programs in the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. He is a member of the U.S. delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, where he Chairs the Steering Committee on Archival Access. His doctorate is in history, and he is currently finishing a manuscript that assesses the political-cultural influence of four newspapers in the Soviet and American zones of occupation in Germany with a focus on the roles played by “everyday” German civilians and Holocaust survivors in the reconstruction of the press. In addition, he is writing a separate work on the relationship between anti-Bolshevism, anti-Americanism, and antisemitism in Western European political and cultural discourse over the course of the twentieth century.


Emily Willard

Emily Willard is Project Coordinator and Research Associate for the "Failure to Prevent" project, a partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, that focuses on mass atrocity and genocide prevention. She is currently researching the international response to the conflicts in Rwanda and Bosnia. Emily frequently writes for the Archive's blog, Unredacted, and contributes to Web postings. Previously, she worked on the National Security Archive's Evidence Project conducting research on Guatemala, Mexico, and El Salvador, and the Colombia Documentation Project. Emily assisted with the publication of the document collection, Colombia and the United States: Political Violence, Narcotics, and Human Rights, 1948-2010. She earned her B.A. and M.A. in International Affairs from The American University in Washington, D.C. focusing her research on human rights and violence against women in Guatemala. She lives in Annapolis, Maryland.

Moderator

Lindsay

Lindsay Krasnoff

Lindsay Sarah Krasnoff is a historian in the Office of the Historian, U.S. Department of State. As Coordinator of the office's Historical Briefing Program, she is responsible for conducting archival research and briefing Ambassadors, Deputy Chiefs of Missions (DCM), and Foreign Service Officers on the history of U.S.-European relations. Lindsay contributes to the office's Digital History, Social Media, and public outreach initiatives. Lindsay has a Ph.D. in History from the Graduate Center, City University of New York (2009), and recently published her book, The Making of Les Bleus: Sport in France, 1958-2010 (Lexington Books, 2013). Lindsay's expertise includes history of the media, sports medicine, and sports diplomacy. She has an M.A. in Journalism and French Studies from New York University (2002), and a B.A. in International Affairs from The George Washington University (1999). She serves on the IT Advisory Committee for the North American Society for Sport History and is a member of the Overseas Press Club of America.

Kathleen Lynch

Kathleen Lynch

John Powers

John Powers

Dr. Robert Williams

Dr. Robert Williams

Emily Willard

Emily Willard

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