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Courses - Spring 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Spring 2014 courses are now availble in Albert, NYU's Student Information System. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs during registration week.
  • Students who secure an internship through or with the assistance of NYU Washington, DC must enroll in the Internship Seminar & Fieldwork course NODEP-UA 9982  or (for Gallatin students) INDIV-UG 9600.
  • Washington, DC classes are listed as time TBA. Because of the relatively small number of students and courses at NYU DC, we like to allow student preferences to impact the timetable we set. In almost all instances we’ll be able to avoid course conflicts. NYU DC staff will also keep in mind that many students will have busy internship schedules when creating the course schedule and will attempt to schedule courses as soon as possible so that internship availability is known.
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu


  Spring 2014| Fall 2014|Spring 2015

Required Course for All Students

This course will introduce students to the citizens and communities in and of Washington, DC. Students will learn about the unique history of the city by exploring how it was founded, designed, governed and developed to become an international capitol. We will examine components of culture and intercultural competence as we learn how diverse populations maintain their cultural identity, support their communities and integrate into the fabric of the city. The portrayal of the Washington, DC in film will be presented to help students understand how this reflects and shapes our understanding of contemporary and historical American political culture. The course will also examine how individuals leverage their positions through institutions and organizations to ignite change in areas such as environmental sustainability, political activism, and international causes. Stakeholders from United States and foreign government agencies, domestic and international organizations, the non-profit and for-profit sectors, as well as public and private groups will deliver guest lectures and join interactive discussions. These sessions will be developed in collaboration with faculty from major pathway disciplines for the site and complimented by field experiences including a walking tour and museum visit in Washington, DC. Students will consider the current state of affairs and be challenged to imagine how the future might be different. Respectful, factual, passionate and influential dialogue will be encouraged and expected.

Syllabus


Environmental Studies

Note, students can also satisfy Environmental Studies major requirements through the Internship Seminar & Fieldwork course.

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. We will explore what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. We will consider how to measure sustainability and discuss the effectiveness of sustainability indicators. We will examine governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. We will also highlight the transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future.

Syllabus


Expressive Culture (College Core Curriculum)

Washington DC is a location and a mindset, an industry and a symbol. Hollywood’s depiction of events in the nation’s capital provides a lens through which to examine the changing understandings of politics in America but also the relationship between fictional narratives of Washington and what we think of as factual understandings. The course is built around a series of themes and their development over time.

Sample Syllabus


Gallatin

 

 

Can be counted for SCA-UA Internship credit (government and non-profit placements only).  Can also be counted for Politics major credit (internship with domestic policy focus only)

The seminar is designed to complement the internship fieldwork experience. In it we explore many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Please note: Students who secure an internship through or with the assistance of NYU Washington, DC must confirm their spot in the program and enroll in the internship class in order to accept the internship. Students are required to pursue 20 hours/ week in their internships to earn course credit. NYU Washington, DC advises that students pursue ~20 hrs/ week in internship committments. If students elect to participate in an internship that exceeds the recommended number of hours, they may be advised to reduce their academic courseload. Students are highly encouraged to consult NYU Washington DC staff for assistance with these decisions.

Syllabus


History

In the 21st century, perhaps no bilateral relationship is more important than that between the People’s Republic of China and the United States. How this relationship between the globe’s sole superpower and a rapidly emerging contender evolves not only will affect their state-to-state interactions but also will affect the daily lives of their citizens, the nations of the Asia-Pacific region, and, inevitably, will have global repercussions. To understand and fully appreciate the current status of US-PRC relations, and in order to envision the possible course this relationship might follow, an examination of their past interactions is necessary. To provide such a foundation, this course will survey major trends, policies, and events that played a role in shaping the Sino-American path to the present and will continue to influence the path to the future.

The format of the course will be discussion. Each week, the class will begin with a general review of the historical context of the period being examined, followed by a student-led discussion of the week’s assigned readings.

Sample Syllabus


Internship

 

 

Can be counted for SCA-UA Internship credit (government and non-profit placements only).  Can also be counted for Politics major credit (internship with domestic policy focus only)

The seminar is designed to complement the internship fieldwork experience. In it we explore many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Please note: Students who secure an internship through or with the assistance of NYU Washington, DC must confirm their spot in the program and enroll in the internship class in order to accept the internship. Students are required to pursue 20 hours/ week in their internships to earn course credit. NYU Washington, DC advises that students pursue ~20 hrs/ week in internship committments. If students elect to participate in an internship that exceeds the recommended number of hours, they may be advised to reduce their academic courseload. Students are highly encouraged to consult NYU Washington DC staff for assistance with these decisions.

Syllabus


Journalism

This will be a hands-on course examining the idea of truth and spin in Washington D.C., politics, governance, journalism, science and society. It will be part overview and lecture on topics central to the course and part active reporting and writing. Spin is the Washington art of taking something and making it seem truth-y even when it’s not quite factual. This is a user’s guide for reporters and non-journalists alike. How to spot and dodge the misleading, the incomplete truth, along with the history and reasoning behind manipulation of facts. Advice from those who practice spin and those who successfully avoid it and what it’s like to be stuck as a victim of spin. To take advantage of the unique Washington location and distinct attitude in the city, students will participate in press conferences and go to public hearings on Capitol Hill in reporting roles and then write news-style articles. Invited guest speakers are from NASA, NOAA, the White House Office of Science Technology and Policy, environmental activist groups, energy lobbyists and Washington media. The intersection of the media with science, politics and economics on the issue of global warming will be a focal point of this course and how it is all spun.

Sample Syllabus


Metropolitan Studies

Note, students can also satisfy Metropolitan Studies major requirements through the Internship Seminar & Fieldwork course.

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. We will explore what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. We will consider how to measure sustainability and discuss the effectiveness of sustainability indicators. We will examine governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. We will also highlight the transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future.

Syllabus


Politics

The goal of this course is to understand the factors that shape campaign strategy and how
campaigns influence and persuade voters through advertising. The course will combine
theory and practice, and will examine case studies from both domestic and international
campaigns. Through presentations and a multi-media framework, we will examine campaign
strategy and media in practice and the key factors and events, like debates, that are part of a
successful strategy and campaign that moves voters.

The format of the course will be multi-dimensional including lectures, discussions, interactive
activities, documentary films, television commercials, insider campaign video, and other
media sources. The instructor will use a keynote presentation format to review the material
and present video clips and commercials to lead and inform class discussions.

Sample Syllabus

The "Arab Spring" unleashed a new dynamic across the Middle East - one in which Arab public opinion has emerged as a factor requiring the attention of political leadership. This is true not only for Arab governments, but for decision-makers and analysts in the West.

The goal of this course will be to examine the role public opinion is playing in shaping on-going developments in Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, the relationships between several Arab states and Iran and Turkey, and efforts to achieve a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

We will explore the use of up-to-date polling in all these countries to better understand how Arabs: see themselves, view their governments, prioritize their political concerns, and get and use information. We will also examine the misconceptions about Arabs that have long shaped policies that the West has adopted toward the Arab World - leading to the deep divide that defines our current relationship with that region.

Syllabus

 

 


Public Policy

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. We will explore what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. We will consider how to measure sustainability and discuss the effectiveness of sustainability indicators. We will examine governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. We will also highlight the transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future.

Syllabus

Course description and syllabus will be based on the course below. Exact description and syllabus will differ slightly.

This course is a gateway into the complex process of public policymaking, involving political and moral choices, along with analytic, administrative, historical, social and even psychological aspects. The course explores how the real world contexts in which public policymaking plays out – whether at the city, national, or global level – shape the ends, means and prospects for government action; and how patterns in policymaking in turn channel and shape today’s politics.

Sample Syllabus


Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester


Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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