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Preparing to Live in a Different City

Leaving a familiar environment is exciting but it can also feel stressful. It is okay to have these very different emotions as you prepare to live in a new city. You will receive guidance from NYU staff during the pre-departure process to assist you as you follow the requirements for travelling and studying in new surroundings. These requirements may include obtaining a passport and/or a student visa, knowing how to get from the airport to the NYU orientation location, or even advice on what to pack. Upon notification of your eligibility to enroll at one of the Global Academic Centers you will be contacted by a Study Away Counselor who will help guide you through the required steps leading to your departure.

Highly qualified NYU staff is in place at each NYU location to assist you once you arrive at your new city. Each NYU center will welcome you with an extensive orientation program as you adjust to your new city and housing assignment and begin to meet other enrolled students. Orientation activities are mandatory to ensure you are prepared to have an academically successful and personally enriching experience. Additional activities to encourage acclimation to your new surroundings will be scheduled throughout the semester.

To help you prepare for the culture shift you may experience as you transition from one city to another, please watch the What is Culture webinar (20 minutes) by clicking the image below. We encourage you to plan ways to reflect on your experiences, such as keeping a personal journal, creating a vlog to share with friends and family, or writing a blog to document your experience.


What is Culture? Webinar

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Location Specific Culture Webinars


Watch these webinars (approximately 10 minutes each) to help you prepare for living in a different city. The information will introduce you to some cultural norms and values of the location.



Next Steps:

1. Research the culture, customs, and people of the country where you will be traveling.
Use the online tools made available by NYU. 
  • World Trade Resource (WTR) is a cultural awareness training tool. WTR has culture and country specific information that will help you understand how to better communicate across cultures. Offered to you by the Office of Global Services.

1. How to use World Trade Resource:  Log into NYU Home and access WTR on the left hand side under "Office of Global Services Resources."  You must be logged in using your NYU net ID and password.

2.  You can select a country of choice and receive a specific overview, including information on education and cultural etiquette.

3.  You can complete your own Cultural Competency to compare your work style to different countries.

2. Choose to learn more from the following resources:

Tips on avoiding the Ugly American stereotype
Peter Greenberg

Of Headhunters and Soldiers: Separating Cultural and Ethical Relativism
Renato Rosaldo

Maximizing Study Abroad: Students' Guide to Strategies for Language and Culture Learning and Use
2nd ed.; R. Michael Paige, Andrew D. Cohen, Barbara Kappler Mikk, Julie C. Chi, & James P. Lassegard (2009) Univ. of Minnesota

Writing Across Culture: An Introduction to Study Abroad and the Writing Process
Kenneth Wagner & Tony Magistrale (2005) NY: Peter Lang.

3. Decide how you will reflect on your experience

Consider whether you want to keep your thoughts private in a personal journal or if you prefer to share your experiences and perspective with friends and family through an online tool such as a vlog, blog, Pinterest, etc. Get started now by picking up a journal at an office supply store or creating your online profile, and let your circle know where to read about your experiences in another culture.

Most popular reflection tools:
  • Blog
  • Post to Facebook
  • Personal journal
Exploring downton Florence.

"I learned that to immerse yourself in a culture means taking some risks – risks of embarrassment, of not feeling comfortable, of doing, seeing, and trying things with an uncertain success rate as to how much you will “like it” or not – however if you ask me, it isn’t about being comfortable, it isn’t even about liking everything. It’s about giving up a little bit of what you think you know about yourself and about life to make space for something new."

- Chelsey A Kapuscinski, Anthropology, CAS 2014

Student Experiences

Gain the student perspective through student profiles and insights!

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