New York University Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Navigation Skip to Sub Navigation

New Courses - Spring 2015

What's new at the Global Academic Centers?

As NYU's Global Network grows we're constantly adding new courses to the curriculum at our sites abroad. The list below are the newest course offerings that we're excited to add to the curriculum. 

NOTE: This is not a complete list of courses, only what's recently been added, to view all Spring 2015 courses view the Spring 2015 courses page here.

NYU's Global Academic Centers offer a wide variety of course offerings from undergraduate departments across the university.  The list below organizes all of the Global course offerings by their sponsoring department.  Use the dropdown menu below or the links to the right to view a specific department.  Course offerings organized by location can be found on the course offerings page for each Global Academic Center.

Students: Keep in mind that departments sometimes give major, minor, or university core credit for courses outside the department.  Always consult your academic advisor when planning your time away. 

Please note: Since the deparmental structure at NYU Abu Dhabi does not align with the academic departments at NYU New York, NYU Abu Dhabi courses are not included in the list below, but can be found here. NYU Shanghai courses sponsored by departments from NYU New York are listed below. In addition, a select group of courses from NYU Shanghai departments are open to Study Away students.

For questions regarding the course offerings below, please contact global.academics@nyu.edu

Fall 2014 | Spring 2015

 

Applied Psychology

Additional courses listed under Teaching and Learning / Applied Psychology

Buenos Aires

A comprehensive overview of human development from conception through adolescence. Theories of developmental psychology are related to research findings, & implications are drawn for practical issues. Liberal Arts Core/CORE Equivalent - satisfies the requirement for Society & Social Sciences


Art and Arts Professions

Florence

Intro to Interdisciplinary Art Practice is designed as an intensive course to provide a forum in which to explore and engage the relationship between photography, performance and contemporary art, otherwise known as the politics of performance. Through class assignments and readings in contemporary theory we will develop a critical vocabulary for an understanding of the relationship between photography and performance and a forum in which to challenge and push our individual practice to the next level. All experience levels are welcome and will be helpful to our class. In Florence, we will use the resources of La Pietra and nearby institutions to engage the site specificity of NYU Florence and its rich history, including field trips, visiting artists, and seminar based classes. The class will take place simultaneously with the Blackamoor project held at La Pietra at NYU Florence, of which Lyle Ashton Harris is participating in. 


Art History

Berlin

This ancient art course, oriented primarily around Greek and Roman art will take full advantage of precisely the collections featured on Museum Island.  


Biology

Tel Aviv

For Biology Major Students only.  Course description coming soon.


Business

London

Prerequisites: ECON-UB11: Economics of Global Business or ECON-UA 238: International Economics and FINC-UB2: Foundations of Finance or ECON-AD 302:Foundations of Financial Markets

This course description is based on the Stern course offered on Washington Square Campus

Recent global financial turbulence has demonstrated both how important the financial
system is to the world economy and how complex it is.

Financial systems are centered on key institutions, instruments and markets. But they
also involve governments, public policy and regulation. They span the globe from the
US, the EU and Japan to Russia, China and the Emerging Markets. In critical ways,
country-level financial architectures are integrating to form a more seamless, high-performance whole. This is good for efficiency, innovation and growth, yet it also
amplifies problems during times of crisis

This course provides students with a broad and rigorous understanding of (i) How the
global financial system works and what purposes it serves, (ii) What the major elements
are and how they operate, and (iii) What challenges the global financial system creates
for public policy makers. In seeking to achieve these objectives, this broad-gauge
course provides a perspective that helps students understand and make the most of
their own professional opportunities. Along with a working knowledge of the global
macroeconomy, foundations of finance and corporate finance, this course will be
extremely helpful for students as a lens to focus on the key dimensions of the modern
business environment.

Sample Syllabus Coming Soon.

 

Prague

Provides the background necessary to make decisions about computer-based information systems and to be an “end-user”. Two major parts of the course are hands-on experience with personal computers and information systems management. Group and individual computer assignments expose students to electronic spreadsheet analysis and database management on a personal computer. Management aspects focus on understanding computer technology, systems analysis and design, and control of information processing by managers. 

This course is being offered at NYU Prague for the first time in Fall 2014. The Syllabus should closely resemble the following sample from NYU in New York:

Sample Syllabus from New York


CAS Non-Departmental Courses

Berlin

Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

Course is currently under development.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 12 -15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by Cultural Vistas, an organization partnering with NYU. Cultural Vistas provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Arts and Museums
Public Policy & Government
Communication and Public Relations
Education
Non-Profits & Civic Engagement
Environment & Sustainability
STEM

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Interested Spring 2015  NYU Berlin students should complete the online application by Friday, October 24. Please note, students must have language proficiency of at least Intermediate II German to be eligible for this internship program. For more information on the application process and deadlines, please visit the NYU Berlin Internship website.

 

Sydney

Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

This 2-credit course is designed to complement and enhance your 2-credit internship fieldwork placement completed during the same semester at NYU Sydney. The seminar provides the structure for you to explore many different aspects of your internship site, and to gain more from your experience by comparing and contrasting the internship experiences of all class participants. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization hosting your internship, including its mission, approach, policies, and the context in which it operates. More generally, we will consider the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Throughout the semester we will take note of similarities and differences of Australian and American workplaces and work culture. Ultimately, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience, and on your personal and future professional goals.

Sample Syllabus


Chemistry

Tel Aviv

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 243, Organic Chemistry I or its equivalent

Students registering for this course must register for Lecture, Laboratory. & Recitation.

 

The aim of the course is to introduce advanced concepts in organic chemistry with particular emphasis on aromatic and carbonyl systems. Some simple aspects of biochemistry including carbohydrates will be discussed. The importance of spectroscopic techniques in organic chemistry will be emphasised.

Weekly 4 1/2 hr. laboratory session. A pre-lab session of 20 minutes will take place at the beginning of each practical class. Students will acquire the practical skills of Organic Chemistry and will become familiar with organic laboratory procedures and techniques.

Sample Syllabus


Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies

Sydney

This course aims to understand the key aspects of the anatomy of the human brain, the development of the human brain across the lifespan and how scientists observe, assess and intervene in the development of neurocognitive processes in childhood and adolescence.  Students will develop an appreciation of the complexity of the human brain, the limits and advantages of our current knowledge. Also, students will gain an awareness that a neurocognitive perspective has explained a considerable array of human behavior, including aspects of emotional functioning and personality.


Classics

Berlin

This ancient art course, oriented primarily around Greek and Roman art will take full advantage of precisely the collections featured on Museum Island.  


College Core Curriculum

Buenos Aires

Please be aware that NYU CAS students will be given registration priority for this course.  CAS students will be able to register at their regularuly assigned appointment time. Non-NYU CAS students will be able to register on Friday of registration week.

Over the last 50 years, millions of Latin Americans have experienced extraordinary shifts in their social, political, and cultural landscape, a result of the transformative effects of revolution or insurgency, state repression, popular resistance and social movements. We focus on events that had continental, hemispheric, and even global impact, including the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the military coups of the 1970s, and the Zapatista uprising in 1994. Drawing on a range of primary sources and cultural forms, we listen carefully to the voices of the major social actors of the time. Our sources are drawn from a wide range of media: newsprint, television broadcasts, transcripts, testimony, essay, documentary and feature film, art, and music. We deliberately mix artistic representations with documentary evidence to understand how the arts—music, visual art, literature, film—do not just reflect the reality around them, but are themselves vital sites for shaping and changing that reality and our imagination of it, both then and now.


Drama

Berlin

This course examines German theater of the twentieth century, from Expressionism to contemporary postdramatic forms of writing and performance. The course will first offer an overview of German theater traditions before 1900 and will then engage in analyzing specific developments in German theater starting with Max Reinhardt and his work at the Deutsches Theater Berlin. Other case studies will focus on Brecht’s epic theater, theater during the Third Reich, postwar theater trends in East and West Germany, and current developments in reunified Germany. Not only will we closely read relevant plays and theory by the theater makers of the respective periods but we will also explore aesthetics and performance issues as they have changed over time. As the involved practice of dramaturgy in Germany has greatly influenced theatrical developments, we will investigate this major aspect of theatrical work in Germany as a contribution to world theater and study how the extensive debate of ideas is being concretely realized in the theater through the choices being made in a production. An integral part of the course will include visits to Berlin theaters, attending performances, which we will analyze in class, and engaging in discussion with contemporary theater makers in Berlin.

Sample Syllabus


Dramatic Writing

Berlin

Prerequisites: Tisch students: DWPG-UT 0020 - The Craft of Dramatic and Visual Writing; or FMTV-UT 33 - Fundamentals of Dramatic and Visual Writing or equivalent. For all other majors, a college-level introductory writing course.

Through a combination of lectures, screenings, field trips, and creative workshops, Writing the
Short Script will deepen students’ understanding of screenwriting and dramatic craft as they
learn how to effectively tell a compelling, dramatic, self-contained film story. Students will learn to
structure a screenplay, create compelling characters that develop externally and internally, build
a chain of causality on the level of story and scene and improve their visual storytelling as they
work toward the completion of several short scripts. Each script must reflect the student’s
personal experience of being in Berlin, whether in a literal or figurative sense. Students will also
be required to film and screen a dramatic scene using materials at hand (e.g., cell phones). A
public reading of selected short scripts will be held at the end of the semester. 


Environmental Studies

Berlin

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

 

Sydney

This course is currently under development

Course description coming soon.What is Australian Environmental History, and how does narrative shape our understanding of Australian Environmental History? This course discusses these questions, as well as others that advance our understanding of the role of environment in Australian history. Questions include: How are environments incorporated into the tool kit of historians? How are environments incorporated into the tool kit of historians? What counts for evidence? Topics include tourism, floods, food, rural and urban environments, acclimatisation and the introduction of plant and animal species over the nineteenth century.


European & Mediterranean Studies

Prague

This class is currently under revision. Course description below may change slightly. A syllabus is not yet available for this course.

This class is devoted not only to a "close reading" of the selected texts, but also to relevant broader issues. While the approach and methods are interdisciplinary, the main emphasis is on literary theory (explaining and applying basic literary terms), literary history (both American and European), and literary criticism (analyzing different responses to given works). Every class starts with the oral presentation delivered by a student, then there is a minilecture by the teacher, and a discussion follows.

 


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Berlin

Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

Course is currently under development.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 12 -15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by Cultural Vistas, an organization partnering with NYU. Cultural Vistas provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Arts and Museums
Public Policy & Government
Communication and Public Relations
Education
Non-Profits & Civic Engagement
Environment & Sustainability
STEM

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Interested Spring 2015  NYU Berlin students should complete the online application by Friday, October 24. Please note, students must have language proficiency of at least Intermediate II German to be eligible for this internship program. For more information on the application process and deadlines, please visit the NYU Berlin Internship website.

 

Buenos Aires

This course brings together students in New York and Buenos Aires to examine how urban arts and politics intersect in the Americas. Two sections, one in each city, will meet and collaborate simultaneously via internet to address several key questions: How are art and politics understood and expressed differently and similarly in these two American metropolises and why? How do shared aesthetic features of public art reflect the global circulation of urban creative modes? What do we learn about local politics from looking at the art and writing on a city’s public spaces? Teams of students in both cities will conduct field work in selected neighborhoods to help create an archive of murals, graffiti, performances, and installations. Then, drawing from readings in history, art criticism, and urban studies, as well as from census and electoral data and using GIS technology, we will analyze how social and political processes like gentrification, inequality, and planning generate and reflect creative political expression as captured in our database, culminating in transnational, collaborative projects that explore what wisdom and truths America's streets continue to reveal, 500 years after conquest.

Florence

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in Florence Program will be given registration priority for this course.

Global Fashion Industry: Italy will provide students with a deep understanding of the contemporary fashion industry in Italy, as well as of Italy's position in the global fashion arena. The course will drive students through the entire lifecycle of the fashion business, from forecasting trends to retailing, through design, sourcing, product development and production. Particular attention will be dedicated to different marketing aspects of the process, such as: identity building, brand positioning, merchandising, buying, costing, communication. All levels of retail, from luxury to mass market will be covered. The course will end with an analysis of the new challenges, such as sourcing globalization, emerging markets, sustainability and growing significance of technology.
A strong effort will be put into organizing site visits to studios, showrooms and factories, as well as meeting with professional players.

Each session will be structured to give students an overview of a particular stage of the Industry, through a mix of lectures from the course leader and visiting professionals, studio and showroom visits, walking tours, reading assignments and practical projects.  Conducted in English.

Sydney

Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

This 2-credit course is designed to complement and enhance your 2-credit internship fieldwork placement completed during the same semester at NYU Sydney. The seminar provides the structure for you to explore many different aspects of your internship site, and to gain more from your experience by comparing and contrasting the internship experiences of all class participants. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization hosting your internship, including its mission, approach, policies, and the context in which it operates. More generally, we will consider the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Throughout the semester we will take note of similarities and differences of Australian and American workplaces and work culture. Ultimately, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience, and on your personal and future professional goals.

Sample Syllabus


German Studies

Berlin

This course examines German theater of the twentieth century, from Expressionism to contemporary postdramatic forms of writing and performance. The course will first offer an overview of German theater traditions before 1900 and will then engage in analyzing specific developments in German theater starting with Max Reinhardt and his work at the Deutsches Theater Berlin. Other case studies will focus on Brecht’s epic theater, theater during the Third Reich, postwar theater trends in East and West Germany, and current developments in reunified Germany. Not only will we closely read relevant plays and theory by the theater makers of the respective periods but we will also explore aesthetics and performance issues as they have changed over time. As the involved practice of dramaturgy in Germany has greatly influenced theatrical developments, we will investigate this major aspect of theatrical work in Germany as a contribution to world theater and study how the extensive debate of ideas is being concretely realized in the theater through the choices being made in a production. An integral part of the course will include visits to Berlin theaters, attending performances, which we will analyze in class, and engaging in discussion with contemporary theater makers in Berlin.

Sample Syllabus


Global Public Health

Accra

This course will examine some of the key issues and principles of environmental health practice. It will focus on the how environmental health issues are defined and approached by civic groups, governmental officials and researchers. It will highlight how environmental threats come to the attention of the public and weigh the options for addressing these threats. Finally, it will underscore the need for multi-disciplinary approaches in understanding these threats and crafting solutions. We will focus on prevention of environmentally mediated diseases and discuss challenges to effective prevention.

 

Buenos Aires

This course is currently marked as tentative, pending the approved appointemnt of an instructor.

This course introduces students to key concepts in health policy formation, implementation and evaluation in a global context. Using a comparative lens, students explore organization, financing and delivery of health care services and health systems around the world. We examine the role of governmental and non-governmental agencies in delivering care and contributing to a health care infrastructure using case studies and other materials in a comparative approach. Key lessons in the implementation of new health policies and initiatives are explored across the developing world, as well as in a US as students explore health system performance, the quality and cost of care, the management of health care services, the process of health improvement and health reform. The course will use a multidisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economics, and ethical perspectives. The objective is to build an understanding of the fundamental ideas, issues, and problems currently debated in global health policy and management and to provide a foundation for future studies and careers in the global health field. Epidemiology in a Global World and Health and Society in a Global Context are recommended but not required pre-requisites for the course.

London

Please note that this course is currently under development.  Actual course description may vary.

This course will examine the various dimensions of the field of public health and how the public’s health is protected. Students explore the ways social, economic, and political forces influence the health of populations. Additionally, this course will focus upon some of the current ethical public health dilemmas where the rights of the individual versus the rights of society come into conflict. The course makes use of diverse methods of instruction, including, but not limited to, small group discussion, group exercises, mini-lectures, student debates, field-based group projects and student presentations. Students may be involved in gathering information and observations from projects outside of the classroom at government, NGO and health care institutions.

Sydney

Please note that this course is currently under development. Actual course description may vary.

By the end of this course students will develop the ability to understand the evolution and current role of epidemiology as an approach to assessing public health problems; describe epidemiological approaches to defining and measuring health problems in defined populations; understand how epidemiologic studies are designed, implemented and analyzed; understand the concepts of measurement of test performance and be able to apply these concepts of testing and screening in a range of health and other settings; understand and apply epidemiological criteria needed to establish cause and effect relationships; understand, and apply key ethical issues to the conduct of epidemiological and other scientific investigations; conduct library research to find information on diseases and other health conditions; and critically read and understand health information.

Sample Syllabus coming soon.

This course will examine some of the key issues and principles of environmental health practice. It will focus on the how environmental health issues are defined and approached by civic groups, governmental officials and researchers. It will highlight how environmental threats come to the attention of the public and weigh the options for addressing these threats. Finally, it will underscore the need for multi-disciplinary approaches in understanding these threats and crafting solutions. We will focus on prevention of environmentally mediated diseases and discuss challenges to effective prevention.

 


Hebrew and Judaic Studies

Israeli Cinema has finally come of age. It has caught up with Israeli literature, scoring awards and world-wide recognition not only for its artistic achievements but also for its gutsy in-depth engagement with political, social, and sex-and-gender borders and boundaries that are local and universal at one and the same time. The course will explore some of these issues as they are tackled in contemporary cinema and fiction. Classes will be organized in three thematic clusters:

  • “Family, I Love and Hate You”
  • “The Political is Personal Too”: War, Terror, Self-sacrifice
  • Crossing the Lines: Trauma, Sex, Gender, Ethnicity

(This grouping is determined by what seems to be a work’s major theme, though most of works studied, and certainly the best among them, are bi- or multi-focal, crossing several boundaries of universal divisions.)

When appropriate, students will be asked to prepare relevant backgrounds materials – socio- historical studies, reviews, etc.
 


History

Sydney

This course is currently under development

Course description coming soon.What is Australian Environmental History, and how does narrative shape our understanding of Australian Environmental History? This course discusses these questions, as well as others that advance our understanding of the role of environment in Australian history. Questions include: How are environments incorporated into the tool kit of historians? How are environments incorporated into the tool kit of historians? What counts for evidence? Topics include tourism, floods, food, rural and urban environments, acclimatisation and the introduction of plant and animal species over the nineteenth century.

Does the Pacific Ocean have an integrated history? Though its waters connect places as diverse as Patagonia, Kamchatka, Hawai’I, Tokyo, Shanghai, and Sydney, histories of these disparate regions and their societies can profitably be considered under a common rubric. This course brings together work across disciplines, from history, anthropology, geography, political economy, and cultural studies, to piece together the contours of the Pacific Ocean, c. 1500 to c. 1850, as a historical arena of internal linkages as well as one forged by connections with the wider world. Central themes of the course will include cultural encounters, comparative empires, trade, and environmental change. 

Washington, D.C.

This course focuses on America’s role in the world beginning with the Spanish-American War of 1898 and on through the end of the Cold War, to include decisions for intervention in World Wars I and II, peacemaking in the Wilsonian style, internationalism as embodied in the League of Nations and the United Nations, and disarmament negotiations as occurred over naval arms limitation during the inter-war period and with nuclear weapons during the Cold War. Korea and Vietnam, the foreign policy of the Depression Era and of the Marshall Plan, the Open Door in China, and other aspects of United States policy and policymaking will also be illuminated. The course will demonstrate the value of utilizing multiple levels of analysis to understand the driving forces that underlie historical developments. 


Journalism

Washington, D.C.

This ambitious, fast-paced course will give you the opportunity to put into practice what you learned in the gateway course Investigating Journalism. We will focus heavily on research and writing but also include multimedia skills that no journalist can be without.  By the end of the semester, students will understand how to research and gather facts, conduct interviews and develop original, well-organized reports for consumption across the media spectrum.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Philosophy

 Paris

Provides an overview of important developments in French philosophy from the 16th century to the 1940s and 1950s. Beginning with the epistemological and metaphysical debates that followed the rediscovery of Ancient philosophy and the Copernican revolution in the sciences, we will consider Montaigne’s skepticism, Descartes’ attempts at securing our knowledge of the soul, God, and the external world, and Condillac’s empiricist critique of Descartes’ theory of knowledge. We will then focus on major developments in French political philosophy in the 18th and 19th centuries, closely intertwined with political events in France at the time, including such figures as Rousseau, Proudhon, and Tocqueville. Finally, we will look at two of the major movements in French philosophy in the first half of the 20th century: Henri Bergson’s attempts to understand the temporal duration conscious beings inhabit, and Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir’s distinctive development of existentialism, a philosophy that grapples with the radical consequences of human freedom. Conducted in English

Prerequisite: Logic (PHIL-UA 70) and one introductory course.

Examines various philosophical and psychological approaches to language and meaning, as well as their consequences for traditional philosophical problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. Discusses primarily 20th-century authors, including Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine.


Physics

Sydney

This course is currently under development.  Prerequisite: PHYS-UA 9011, General Physics I with a grade of C- or better

Students registering for this course must register for Lecture, Laboratory, and Recitation.

This course is a continuation of PHYS-UA 9011. This course is composed of a lecture and laboratory-recitation. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion, electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Politics

Washington, D.C.

This course focuses on America’s role in the world beginning with the Spanish-American War of 1898 and on through the end of the Cold War, to include decisions for intervention in World Wars I and II, peacemaking in the Wilsonian style, internationalism as embodied in the League of Nations and the United Nations, and disarmament negotiations as occurred over naval arms limitation during the inter-war period and with nuclear weapons during the Cold War. Korea and Vietnam, the foreign policy of the Depression Era and of the Marshall Plan, the Open Door in China, and other aspects of United States policy and policymaking will also be illuminated. The course will demonstrate the value of utilizing multiple levels of analysis to understand the driving forces that underlie historical developments. 

This class is an introduction to both the logic and the mathematics of statistics, with an emphasis on social-science applications.  Topics include basic descriptive statistics, the logic of causal order, bivariate regression, multiple regression analysis, probability, confidence intervals, significance testing, regression diagnostics, multicollinearity and heteroskedasticity. Lab sessions are largely devoted to the computer application Stata.

Sample Syllabus is coming soon!

 


Psychology

Sydney

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course is a survey of cognitive psychology, the scientific study of the human mind and human thinking. During the course of the semester we will discuss many different aspects of cognition: perception, attention, memory, language, concepts, reasoning, problem solving, expertise, creativity, and decision making. The emphasis in the course will be on how psychologists have used experiments to help construct theories of how the human mind works and how human thinking occurs. The class will involve lectures, student presentations, discussion, video material to accompany lectures, and occasional example class experiments. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and conduct an empirical study, which they write up in a research report.

Sample Syllabus


Social & Cultural Analysis

Please note that other SCA courses are found under their specific program headings.

Sydney

This course offers a wide-ranging critique of Australian culture and society. It aims to interrogate Australian society with a methodology that draws on critical race theory, feminism, social geography and cultural studies. It will look at issues such as the relationship between Australian settler culture and Aboriginal Australians; Australia’s experience of migration and multiculturalism; Australians’ relationship with their environment; and Australians’ sense of national identity. In particular, it will consider how these issues have played out in popular culture.

This course offers a special experience for students wishing to broaden and deepen their methodologies of cultural analysis. Australian society is fascinating in itself, but it also offers a unique perspective on transnational issues such as identity formation, social justice movements and the experience of multiculturalism. For instance, given Australia’s history of Indigenous and non-Indigenous relations, the issue of race in a post-colonial context is particularly acute here. Through comparison with the Australian experience, students will develop a more critical view of American and global society. Students wishing to pursue a career that involves cultural analysis will benefit greatly from studying Australian society, in Australia, and thus developing this comparative approach.

This course has three interweaving themes of study: race, class and gender. This course will look at how these issues have played out in various facets of Australian culture, ie: attitudes to the landscape; representations of crime; humour; and art. The course is bookended by sessions that consider place-making in Australia: an introductory session that looks at exploration and mapping, and a concluding session that looks at popular music and geographies of place.

Sample Syllabus


Spanish

Buenos Aires

In the last ten years, several Latin American nations have witnessed decisive progress in the legal recognition of non-normative sexualities and gender identities. Argentina passed the same-sex marriage law in 2010 and the gender identity law in 2011, followed by Uruguay; Colombia approved the legal recognition of same sex couples, and in Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, the pressure of queer demands and visibility in the public sphere is stronger than ever. The conventional map of “advanced democracies” crafting models of democratization that could be exported to less developed nations seems definitely challenged: a new understanding of the complex, and multiple temporalities of queer cultures in North and South America is more necessary than ever.

In order to explore this rich and multi-layered landscape, this course wants to trace and reconstruct the historical detours of queer cultures in Buenos Aires and New York. Taking as starting point the present context of growing acceptance and inclusion of queer citizens both in Latin America and the US, the course revisits the last three decades in order to question the dominant and frequently reductive narratives of steady, lineal progress. Our goal is precisely to advance a periodization sensitive to the nuances and contradictions of this complex historical transformation.

Este curso se pregunta qué es y cómo se lee una fotografía. Consideraremos además la relación entre fotografía y literatura a partir del análisis de textos que incluyen fotografías en diálogo con la escritura o en otros que, sin incluir imágenes, usan la fotografía como tema, principio constructivo o como un cuerpo de problemas críticos y teóricos. El curso servirá también como introducción a la producción fotográfica local que será vista y comentada en las clases (en los distintos “Recorridos visuales”) así como en las visitas a museos, galerías y estudios fotográficos. Prestaremos especial atención a cuestiones como la relación entre signo y existencia del objeto, el valor de verdad de lo fotográfico, su relación con lo real y el realismo, la memoria, la identidad, el tiempo, el museo. (El curso se enseña en español y requiere habilidad para leer textos literarios breves en español; se ha elegido especialmente bibliografía teórica y crítica escrita o traducida al inglés).

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200.

Este curso se propone discutir y examinar diferentes formas en que el terror aparece y se despliega en la literatura rioplatense (mayormente en Argentina, aunque también incluye algunos escritores del Uruguay) desde mediados del siglo XIX hasta la actualidad. El terror es uno de los elementos constitutivos de la literatura y la cultura rioplatense prácticamente desde sus orígenes. En varios de sus textos considerados “fundacionales”, el terror, vinculado directamente con ciertas prácticas políticas, es motivo de reflexión al mismo tiempo que se vuelve un eje alrededor del cual se organiza la escritura. Pero ese interés por el terror se manifiesta no sólo a través del análisis político, filosófico o histórico de la cuestión, sino también a partir de un tratamiento literario que parece exhibir mejor que cualquier análisis la esencia y el funcionamiento del terror. Por eso la presencia del terror en los inicios de la literatura rioplatense también puede y debe analizarse teniendo en cuenta otra perspectiva: la del terror en tanto género o modo de lo literario, derivado directo de la narrativa gótica que surge en Europa en la segunda mitad del siglo XVIII. Ese cruce entre terror político y terror literario es una marca que está en el origen de la literatura rioplatense y que va a perdurar, con algunas variantes, hasta la actualidad.


El propósito del curso es partir del repaso de algunas definiciones y conceptos vinculados con el “terror”, para luego hacer un análisis de diferentes textos de la literatura rioplatense, desde los inicios, en los que es perceptible claramente el cruce entre política, literatura y terror, pasando por otros momentos en los que esa relación se resignifica y el terror toma formas diversas, pero sin abandonar ese cruce fundacional.


Teaching and Learning / Applied Psychology

Accra

Students enrolling in the Human Development course sequence must register for both APSY-UE 9020 Human Development I and one of the Human Development II sections (APSY-UE 9021, 9022, or 9023). Human Development I runs for the first 7 weeks of the semester followed by Human Development II. All sections of Human Development II will meet together for class sessions however classroom observations and assignments will be differentiated.

Students enrolling in the Human Development course sequence must also conduct observations in an Accra school classroom each week.

Introduction to research and theory of human development across the life span. Seminal theories & basic research of individual growth & development are analyzed & critiqued. Emphasis is on the range in human development with discussion of normative & non-normative development. Emphasis is also placed on the importance of understanding the influence of normative & non-normative contexts of development, including the impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, personal health, & safety. Relations between home, school, & community and their impact on development are also explored via readings, lectures, discussions, & weekly observations in the field. Interrogation of implicit folk theories as a foundation for exploration of formal knowledge of human development.

Sample Syllabus

Further analysis of research findings & theories of human development focusing on early childhood, & applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include: language development, assessment of readiness to learn, separation from the family, peer relationships, aesthetic experiences. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive & dangerous environments, & of alcohol, tobacco & drug use will also be included. Direct application of theory & research is made through field-based inquiry & issue-based investigation.

Sample Syllabus - Note Sample Syllabus is from NYU London, Sample NYU Accra syllabus will be posted when available.

Further analysis of research findings & theories of human development focusing on childhood, & applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include: numeric competence, assessment of reading problems, gender differences in learning styles. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive & dangerous environments, & of alcohol, tobacco, & drug use will also be included. Direct application of theory & research is made through field-based inquiry & issue-based investigation.

Sample Syllabus - Note Sample Syllabus is from NYU London, Sample NYU Accra syllabus will be posted when available.

Further analysis of research findings & theories of human development focusing on early through late adolescence & applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include puberty, cross-gender peer relations, preventing risky behaviors, understanding & mastering test-based graduation requirements, transition to work/college, identity development, depression, & aggression. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive & dangerous environments & of alcohol, tobacco, & drug use is also included. Direct application of theory & research is made through field-based inquiry & issue-based investigation.

Sample Syllabus - Note Sample Syllabus is from NYU London, Sample NYU Accra syllabus will be posted when available.


Direct Enrollment Opportunities

Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv University (TAU) is Israel's largest higher education institution and is home to 30,000 students studying in the academic areas of science, humanities and the arts.  NYU is pleased to allow students to enroll in TAU courses for NYU credit. This exciting opportunity allows students to engage with local students in the classroom.

Below is a list of courses that are either approved for the current semester or have been approved in the past (as specified).  If you are interested in taking courses at TAU that are not listed below, please email global.academics@nyu.edu for more information.

In its first two decades, Israel's history was dominated by intense and dramatic events. These early years in the nascent stage were characterized by wars, ongoing security problems, mass immigration and economic hardship, all of which brought political and social unrest.
The 1948 war left its remark on the entire population. Although the Jewish side was the victor, it suffered a massive loss of lives and damages to industry and economic achievements. In addition, the war ended with an unresolved Palestinian refugee problem and a significant Arab minority that remained within the borders of the Jewish state and subject to military administration.

The course will explore the cultural and ethnic groups that comprise Israeli society and show how they shaped Israeli collective identity. After the proclamation of the state of Israel in May 1948 a state had to be built. The political, economic and social institutions of Israel evolved from pre state institutions created during the rule of the British mandate over Palestine. The ideology of Mamlachtiyut (statism) was developed in order to mobilize the political system and a wide array of institutions.

NYU Footer