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New Courses - Spring 2014

What's new at the Global Academic Centers?

As NYU's Global Network grows we're constantly adding new courses to the curriculum at our sites abroad. The list below are the newest course offerings that we're excited to add to the curriculum. 

NOTE: This is not a complete list of courses, only what's recently been added, to view all Spring 2014 courses view the spring 2014 courses page here.

NYU's Global Academic Centers offer a wide variety of course offerings from undergraduate departments across the university.  The list below organizes all of the Global course offerings by their sponsoring department.  Use the dropdown menu below or the links to the right to view a specific department.  Course offerings organized by location can be found on the course offerings page for each Global Academic Center.

Students: Keep in mind that departments sometimes give major, minor, or university core credit for courses outside the department.  Always consult your academic advisor when planning your time away. 

Please note: Since the deparmental structure at NYU Abu Dhabi does not align with the academic departments at NYU New York, NYU Abu Dhabi courses are not included in the list below, but can be found here. NYU Shanghai courses sponsored by departments from NYU New York are listed below. In addition, a select group of courses from NYU Shanghai departments are open to Study Away students. These courses are included on the NYU Shanghai course listing webpage here but not on the list below.

For questions regarding the course offerings below, please contact global.academics@nyu.edu

Africana Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Accra

Examines gender from a multidisciplinary perspective and in particular as a
sociolinguistic variable in speech behavior. How do linguistic practices both reflect
and shape our gender identity, and how do these reflect more global socio-cultural
relationships between the sexes? Do women and men talk differently? To what degree
do these differences seem to be universal or variable across cultures? How do dominant
gender-based ideologies function to constrain women and men’s choices about their
gender identities and gender relationships? How does gendered language intersect with
race and class-linked language? How is it challenged by linguistic “gender bending”?
What impact does gendered language have on the power relationships in given societies?
Also examines gendered voices—and silences—in folklore and in literature. Asks how
particular linguistic practices contribute to the production of people as “women and
men”?


Applied Psychology

Courses listed under Teaching and Learning / Applied Psychology


Art and Arts Professions

Berlin

The course, ‘Image and Process’ will examine the relationship between image,
made by camera and other photographic means, and process, whereby a
transformation occurs and ideas, both formal and conceptual emerge. Berlin,
a city in constant transformation itself, offers an enormous variety of sites and
layers of history, providing locations and ambience for both an environmental
as well as personal investigation into identity. The emphasis of the course will
be on learning to see and to develop one’s own personal viewpoint.

Sample Syllabus


Art History

Paris

Paris by the Seine stars in more Hollywood films than any other city. London on the Thames takes close runner-up position. But more than mythic, popular-culture stage sets, these two great European capitals operate as spectacular rival models in face of real-life, 21st-century dramas. Our course concentrates on a sequence of case studies targeting the evolving architecture and urban plan of Paris. We focus on current thematic debates crucial to its identity, survival and future—tradition contra innovation, continuity contra rupture, preservation contra demolition, obsolescence contra revitalization. We investigate controversies over the low- and high-density city; legislation on building heights, protection of skyline and riverbanks; the interface between historic and experimental building types; the balance between public and private space, residential and mixed-economy neighbourhoods, inner-city rehabilitation and suburban sprawl; intra- and extra-muros transportation systems (road, rail, river, air). As a foil and finale to our Paris studies, we conclude with a critical comparative analysis of contemporary London to illuminate fundamental differences between these two global cities: the rational French model largely tempered by state control against the exuberant English model predominantly driven by ultra-liberal policies. Will the third millennium ideal city emerge as a polymorphic combination of the two approaches? Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus


Biology

Tel Aviv

For Biology Major Students only.  Course description coming soon.


Business

Sydney

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (6 credits) OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (4 credit) plus ECON-UA 19/STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structure and financial asset valuation. This course seeks to equip students with a fundamental understanding of the concepts and principles of finance. The main topics of the course are time value of money, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing (CAPM), equity valuation, arbitrage pricing, fixed income securities and derivatives. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. Every effort will be made to relate the course material to current financial news.

Throughout the course the emphasis will be on two main areas: learning conceptual knowledge through theory and problem solving; and critical thinking through the application of real-life scenarios and local cases. The course will incorporate aspects of Australian securities market and financial institutions and a comparative approach will be adopted in demonstrating similarities and differences between the U.S. capital market and the Australian capital market.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces students to the concepts and skills needed to create and critique effective marketing. Marketers in all organisations require an understanding of the many facets of marketing, beyond simply advertising or communications. The American Marketing Association defines marketing as:

“Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.”

The course focuses on the role of marketing and its importance in contemporary organisations and society. During the session, students will critically explore marketing principles, concepts and models from a practical perspective. Beyond studying the theory of marketing, students will analyse a variety of real-world examples and case studies. Organisations need to create a balanced, coordinated marketing mix, where all elements of its marketing activities work together. Marketing also requires combining qualitative and quantitative analysis to gain an understanding and reveal insights into the internal and external environment. To achieve this, the course uses a combination of lectures, class discussion, case studies, assignments and exams. The remainder of this syllabus describes the course and students responsibilities.

Sample Syllabus


CAS Non-Departmental Courses

Madrid

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and a minimum of 16 hours of fieldwork per week (two full days). Internship placements are made by EUSA, an internship placement organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Paris

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and two full days and one half day (Monday-Friday) for their internship.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon



Chemistry

Tel Aviv

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 243, Organic Chemistry I or its equivalent

Students registering for this course must register for Lecture, Laboratory. & Recitation.

 

The aim of the course is to introduce advanced concepts in organic chemistry with particular emphasis on aromatic and carbonyl systems. Some simple aspects of biochemistry including carbohydrates will be discussed. The importance of spectroscopic techniques in organic chemistry will be emphasised.

Weekly 4 1/2 hr. laboratory session. A pre-lab session of 20 minutes will take place at the beginning of each practical class. Students will acquire the practical skills of Organic Chemistry and will become familiar with organic laboratory procedures and techniques.

Sample Syllabus


Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies

London

Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have completed an introductory course in psychology and a course in either child and adolescent psychopathology or abnormal psychology or have received consent of the instructor.

Worldwide studies suggest that up to 20% of children and adolescents suffer from significant mental health problems, but how mental health and illness are perceived varies greatly around the world. The first part of the course will provide an overview of cross-cultural child development, social determinants of mental health, trauma and resilience, and the global public health significance of mental illness. Using this framework, we will look at the impact of poverty, war and conflict, HIV/AIDS, and gender-specific exploitation on children’s development. Through lectures, discussion, readings, and documentaries, this course will provide an overview of the scope and magnitude of child and adolescent mental health issues globally. Selected case studies from the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East will be used to illustrate key concepts.

As an advanced seminar, there is an assumption that students will have previous interest and knowledge in child and adolescent mental health as understood in the United States—i.e. how it is perceived, debated, and addressed by society, as well as mental health specialists. From this basis, our study will be expanded to global perspectives, while recognizing and critically examining dominant paradigms, available resources, and barriers to change. Please be advised that this is a challenging course--classes require thoughtful preparation and active participation.

Sample Syllabus


Expressive Cultures (College Core Curriculum)

Sydney

How has Australian cinema engaged with significant and often contested historical, political and cultural events in the nation’s past? The films in this course offer critical perspectives on the history of colonisation in Australia; the legacies of the Stolen Generations; the controversies surrounding Australia’s role in World War One; as well as Australia’s relationships with its Pacific Asian neighbours. We will focus on films that have marked significant shifts in public consciousness about the past such as Gallipoli (1981), Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002) and Balibo (2009). We will also draw on films that have employed innovative narrative and aesthetic strategies for exploring the relationship between the past and the present such as Ten Canoes (2006) and The Tracker (2002). Throughout the course, students will develop their understanding of the basic methods and concepts of cinema studies. In particular, students will develop a critical vocabulary for analysing how filmmakers have approached the use of memory, testimony, re-enactment, researched detail, allegory and archives across a diverse range of examples.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, D.C.

Washington DC is a location and a mindset, an industry and a symbol. Hollywood’s depiction of events in the nation’s capital provides a lens through which to examine the changing understandings of politics in America but also the relationship between fictional narratives of Washington and what we think of as factual understandings. The course is built around a series of themes and their development over time.

Sample Syllabus


French

Paris

“He’s a real dog!” “What a pig!” “She’s a fox!” “What an animal!” In this course we follow major French authors in the adventure of imagining, toying with, and (re)thinking the often problematic distinctions between the human and the animal. Through our study of a wide variety of genres and disciplines, we examine both the theoretical discourses and artistic and literary representations of the human-animal relation. Authors include Montaigne, contemporary novelist Marie Darrieussecq, the fabulist La Fontaine and the filmmaker François Truffaut. Drawing from a wide selection of texts and media we explore the multiple forms this relation has taken and the extent to which it touches areas about which we humans, “rational animals,” remain particularly sensitive.

Since the 17th century Paris has been as a city of and for the theatre, from the great sites and
events that have marked theatre history, to the spectacle and fantasy that the city imparts.
In this course, we study the great works of French theatre, from the classics to the very
contemporary, through readings, performances, and visits in and around Paris to the lieux
de mémoire of the theatre world. Through the study of works by Corneille, Molière, Hugo,
Feydeau, Ionesco, Beckett, Sartre, and others, we consider how Paris has been integral to and
shaped by the world of French theatre. Visits include such prestigious venues as the Comédie
Française, the grands boulevards where Parisians discovered Shakespeare in the age of Sarah
Bernhardt, the remains of the Théâtre du Marais where Corneille performed his plays, or
Versailles where Molière helped lead the grand spectacle that was life under Louis XIV.
Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

This course can count toward the cultural specialization or elective within the major requirements in Comparative Literature. However, it is recommended that Comparative Literature majors check with their
DUGS to have this course approved for their individual specialization. This course CANNOT be counted as a core comparative literature course.


In this course we focus on four contemporary novels in which the world of the character, the narrator, or the author, is read through the lens of a literary classic. In each case, the reading and rewriting of the primary text involves temporal and spatial displacements (from the 18th to the 20th century, from Europe to the Carribean and to the South Pacific) that generate shifting perspectives and a constant reshuffling of centre and periphery. Between a reverential affiliation to the past and a creative misreading and rewriting of it, these intertextual encounters with « great » Western literary works insistently raise the questions of identity, originality, and “writing back”. Exploring these questions will therefore also involve drawing on comparative, translation, and postcolonial studies. Conducted in English.


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

London

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

The topic of clothing and adornment embraces a broad spectrum, from the need for protective covering to the desire for individual expression to the profit goal of international industries. Clothing epitomizes the way a fundamental necessity has been transformed by cultural construction---as well as desire and creativity---into a complex social indicator, a matrix of culture, class, gender identity and aesthetics. This course looks at the ways clothing and fashion are used by story tellers, in print and on film, from the ancient world to the modern as indicators of civilization, individuality, sensuality, polymorphous gender, guilt, and conspicuous consumption. In order to establish a critical grid and vocabulary with which to discuss fiction’s use of clothing/fashion our sources will also include readings in cultural studies, art, sociology, economics, fashion theory, and semiotics.

Sample Syllabus

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

This course will introduce students to the lifecycle of fashion, from forecasting fashion trends to the retailing and representation of vintage clothing, through design development, branding, buying and journalism. The course will also explore key issues for the sector – ethics, sustainability and the impact of the digital revolution. It will add a practical dimension to the NYU London triptych of fashion exploration, giving students unique access to studios and businesses working at the heart of London’s vibrant fashion industry. Each session is structured to give students an overview of a particular stage in the fashion development process, through a mix of lectures from the course leader and visiting professionals, studio visits, walking tours, reading assignments and practical projects.

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

This interdisciplinary seminar serves as a broad overview for several centuries of British male and female fashion trends, from roughly the Tudor period to today. The course focuses on ways that modes and standards of dress evolved in response to political, economic and technological developments; empire and immigration; changing gender and class formations; and the vagaries of popular culture. In short, the course examines not only what people wore at different historical moments, but why they wore what they did, and how they felt about it. Readings come from the fields of literature, history, art history, gender studies, and sociology.

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and a minimum of 16 hours of fieldwork per week (two full days). Internship placements are made by EUSA, an internship placement organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Paris

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and two full days and one half day (Monday-Friday) for their internship.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon



Global Programs

Accra

This course has three main objectives: a) to enable students to gain insights into the local culture and context, and b) to deepen students’ understanding of Ghana’s and Africa’s relationship with other cultures, especially the West, c) and to equip students with basic communication skills in a local language. To achieve the first two objectives, guest speakers will be invited to talk about specific topics, including the history, society and culture, religion, indigenous and contemporary health and political systems and their relevance in contemporary Ghana. These lectures and discussions will be complemented by site visits and excursions to major historical and cultural sites. It is hoped that these talks and field trips will provide the relevant background information for students to understand some of the issues raised in their classes as well as their day-to-day encounters within their new environment. Regarding the third objective, there will be three introductory lessons in the Twi dialect of Akan, the most widely spoken local language in the country.

This course will combine talks, discussions, field trips and assignments. Four 1 - 1.5hrs guest lectures, two site visits, and two language lessons will form part of the orientation activities in WEEK 0. In the first six weeks of the semester, there will be two additional field trips and film screenings. Each student is expected to write three 2-page reaction/reflection papers on any of the talks, site visits and film documentaries.

Berlin

This course offers a survey of Modern Germany (its history, politics and culture) and an investigation of how Germany's past, always very present, shapes responses to contemporary challenges and new opportunities. The overview investigates not only the country's experiments with authoritarianism - the experiences of mass murder, war and division - but also its emergence as a democratic leader, in the arts and human rights, and as Europe's power broker. We examine questions of citizenship and diversity, Germany's 'special' responsibility as a leader in Europe, the role of the Holocaust in State governance, Berlin's status and development as an industrial and cosmpolitan metropolis, and new avenues for German identity. We ask how these histories have made today's Berlin Europe's most exciting capital - a nexus of youth culture and the interational arts scene - and Germany a vanguard of the arts, sustainable energy, technical development and global politics.

Sample Syllabus

 

Buenos Aires

The purpose of this class is to introduce the students into key concepts and issues of Contemporary Argentina and its geopolitical context, e.g. Latin America and the World. Through an approach to local, cultural, and political issues the course will address how Argentina interacts with the region and the world, and how this international context impacts on Argentina. The emphasis will be on addressing a number of concepts that are necessary to understand Contemporary Argentina, politics in Buenos Aires and their relationship with the world. Spanish spoken in the Rio de la Plata region will be taught from a pragmatic approach, encouraging the learning and use of local expressions and Argentine Spanish, including political expressions used in the media, political activism and the everyday life of porteños –the inhabitants of Buenos Aires.

Florence

This course provides students with a shared study-away experience at NYU Florence, engages them in the intellectual life of our site, and prepares them for their course work by giving them a basic foundation in the history and culture of Italy. Students also benefit from basic instruction in Italian language; this instruction is designed to supplement their formal language courses and to enable them to function in their new surroundings.

 

London

We often hear that Britain is a global country and London is a global city, but what does this mean? In recent years Britain has undergone striking changes in its social makeup, political outlook and cultural activities. Rapid change also brings tensions around housing, the National Health Service and education all of which are increasingly facing pressures from immigration, larger numbers of unemployed and the economic squeeze. The most recent census suggested Polish was the second is spoken language in Britain. So what is happening and why and how does it affect you as a visiting student?

Global Orientation: British Culture is intended to introduce students to ideas formed by global and local issues and focus on concerns regarding politics, the media, migration, the free market, foreign policy, cultural homogeneity and democracy that are the keys to modern British national identity.
The course in based around a series of lectures and talks by prominent speakers from British politics, culture, economics and the arts, and incorporates various optional excursions into London to see some of what is being talked about in action.

Sample Syllabus

Sample 2

Madrid

The Global Orientations course in Madrid aims to put you (students) in direct contact with Spain, so that you have the opportunity to get to know and engage in Spanish culture and language, regardless of your level of Spanish. This workshop will help you to be able to engage in Spanish culture and language by means of an active, practical and lively learning experience. During Orientation week and over the course of the semester, you’ll attend sessions with NYU Madrid professors, tour Madrid and surrounding cities, visit two of Madrid’s most renowned art museums, take a weekend trip to a different part of Spain, and you’ll have the opportunity to take part in interactive workshops (Spanish cooking, wine or dance). Finally, you’ll read an article that will help you to reflect on your observations of and experiences in Madrid, and you’ll write a brief paper incorporating your conclusions. All in all, Global Orientations seeks to help you make the most of your experience in Madrid so that you leave knowing where you’ve been and how the experience may have affected you as a person.

Paris

This course aims to explore the place that Paris – and more broadly France -- hold in the public imaginary, while examining the tensions and antagonisms that rightfully complicate that view. Through a series of conferences, site visits, and seminars, the course examines four key moments or themes as a means of apprehending the density of French cultural, social, and political life. Starting with French republicanism, past, present, and future, we consider how France, at once the preeminent site of experiments in democratic liberty, is also plagued by institutional entrenchments of class stratification and the dual specters of colonialism and post-colonialism. Turning to Paris, the “capital of modernity,” we reflect on its 19th century emergence as a locus of phantasmagoria, mystery, and seduction, and the emergent capitalist forces that were shaping the urban landscape. We consider the early 20th century avant-garde, among the most important and radical artistic and political movements of our time, that opened new spaces in which to imagine the very terms of “art” and “politics,” to finish with a consideration of France in the contemporary moment, wrestling with global transformations, the crisis of the welfare state, and a tension between the reproduction of elites and a political commitment to equality that increasingly troubles the country’s educational system, politics, and cultural life.

Interdisciplinary and “inter-textual” in scope, the course fuses expert lectures, textual analysis, and out of the classroom experience, to bring together the artistic, the literary, and the social scientific, against the backdrop of global transformation.

Class organization and assignments

This is a required course for all students at NYUParis. Students meet in assigned groups according to their language level; students with an advanced level of French may do their coursework in French. Students are expected to attend all conferences and site visits, to do the assigned readings and to participate in class discussions.

 

Prague

The purpose of this class is primarily to discuss the history and culture of the Czech Republic and Central Europe—the intersection of many international influences--in the context of globalization and, conversely, to discuss globalization in the local context. An important dimension of the class will be a discussion about how international students should use their experience abroad (in this case Prague and, more generally, Central Europe) to better understand complicated developments on the global level and back at home.

Shanghai

This course is being offered to familiarize all students, irrespoective of college or concentration, with a range of issues that inform understandng of life in contemporary China. To complete the course, students will engage in experiential learning activities, learn about issues pertinent to Chinese society and history, and interact with experts in various fields of Chinese studies.

Sydney

Australian society is replete with contradictions. Aussies famously describe their nation as the lucky country, yet from the Indigenous perspective, it might more aptly be called the stolen country. Australia is the land of the fair go, which cruelly detains refugees; a multicultural nation with a history of a white Australia policy; a place with distinctive local traditions, which takes many of its cues from global culture; an easy-going country with a surprisingly large degree of governmental control over individual liberties; a highly urbanised population that romances the Bush and the Outback as embodying ‘real’ Australia; a nation proud of its traditions of egalitarianism and mateship, with numerous rules about who is allowed in ‘the club’; a society with a history of anti-British and anti-American sentiment that simultaneously hold strong political allegiances and military pacts with Britain and the USA; and a place with a history of progressive social policy and a democratic tradition, which has never undergone a revolution. This course strives to make sense of Australian society and culture by exploring the complexities and contradictions in Australia’s self-image.

The course will be introduced with an overview, and followed by four sessions covering four distinct themes during Orientation and the first three weeks of semester. Each session will include a 1-hour lecture, either given by the instructor or a guest lecturer, and a recitation-style discussion. There are seven mandatory field trips: Sydney Harbour Cruise, Rocks Walking Tour, The Blue Mountains, Featherdale Wildlife Park, Balmain Bowling Club Lawn Bowls, Overnight trip to Inglevale Farm, and the NYU World Tour.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

This course is designed to help you understand contemporary Israel – the society, its problems and its pre-occupations. Together with tours and special lectures, the first half of the course will focus on some historical background. (The facts are important, but no one in the Middle East agrees on “the facts.” In this part of the world, debates about the past have a huge impact on the present.) Without going too much into the past, we will examine the formative events of Israeli society, those events that explain the special features of Israel today – its politics, institutions, culture, popular thinking and more. The course will begin in 1948 and progress to contemporary issues, including the most controversial ones.

Washington, DC

This course will introduce students to the citizens and communities in and of Washington, DC. Students will learn about the unique history of the city by exploring how it was founded, designed, governed and developed to become an international capitol. We will examine components of culture and intercultural competence as we learn how diverse populations maintain their cultural identity, support their communities and integrate into the fabric of the city. The portrayal of the Washington, DC in film will be presented to help students understand how this reflects and shapes our understanding of contemporary and historical American political culture. The course will also examine how individuals leverage their positions through institutions and organizations to ignite change in areas such as environmental sustainability, political activism, and international causes. Stakeholders from United States and foreign government agencies, domestic and international organizations, the non-profit and for-profit sectors, as well as public and private groups will deliver guest lectures and join interactive discussions. These sessions will be developed in collaboration with faculty from major pathway disciplines for the site and complimented by field experiences including a walking tour and museum visit in Washington, DC. Students will consider the current state of affairs and be challenged to imagine how the future might be different. Respectful, factual, passionate and influential dialogue will be encouraged and expected.

Sample syllabus


History

Florence

The first part of the course provides a general chronological overview of immigration history on both sides of the Atlantic from World War II to the present, including the legacy of World War II, the rise of the UN minority protection regime, the reform of discriminatory immigration law opening immigration to more diverse countries of origin, and the contribution of European decolonization and the US Civil Rights movement to transforming the political, juridical and cultural framework for immigration. The second part of the course the focus will shift away from macro-trends and meta-narratives to look more closely at the diverse mechanisms of integration of immigrant populations at the local level in selected US and European cities, investigating concrete examples of how the integration of immigrants took place in local education systems (inter cultural education curriculum, religious accommodation in the classroom) and the local labor market (specific attention to textile industry).

In addition to the Seminar, students will attend lectures in preparation for the conference, the conference itself and a special discussion/question and answer session with panelists. By the end of the semester students will have developed a better understanding of the historical factors that have contributed to the contemporary immigration debate and how the similarities and differences in the experience of and response to immigration in Europe and the United States has shaped the transatlantic dialogue on immigration.

London

This course examines the history of the Irish in Britain from earliest times to the present day, with a
particular focus on the last two centuries and a component which introduces students to the role of
archives in historical research. The course takes a broadly thematic approach to the subject of the Irish in Britain looking at set topics each week across the chronological range. By doing so, it provides students with a wide-ranging and comparative historical perspective on issues such as: changing motivations for migration; evolving patterns of transport and settlement; shifting social and political influences; the development of differing cultural identities and expression. In addition to looking at relations between migrant and host communities, the course also explores interactions between the Irish in Britain and the Irish in Ireland and investigates how the relationship between those who leave and those who stay is reflected in the social, political and cultural domains. A strong emphasis of the course will be access to archival records and collections in order to provide students with the opportunity to directly consult contemporaneous documentation and other audio-visual materials. The course will conclude with a review of the key themes and an assessment of the current position of the Irish in Britain in relation to the wider Irish diaspora.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, D.C.

In the 21st century, perhaps no bilateral relationship is more important than that between the People’s Republic of China and the United States. How this relationship between the globe’s sole superpower and a rapidly emerging contender evolves not only will affect their state-to-state interactions but also will affect the daily lives of their citizens, the nations of the Asia-Pacific region, and, inevitably, will have global repercussions. To understand and fully appreciate the current status of US-PRC relations, and in order to envision the possible course this relationship might follow, an examination of their past interactions is necessary. To provide such a foundation, this course will survey major trends, policies, and events that played a role in shaping the Sino-American path to the present and will continue to influence the path to the future.

The format of the course will be discussion. Each week, the class will begin with a general review of the historical context of the period being examined, followed by a student-led discussion of the week’s assigned readings.

Sample Syllabus


Irish Studies

London

This course examines the history of the Irish in Britain from earliest times to the present day, with a
particular focus on the last two centuries and a component which introduces students to the role of
archives in historical research. The course takes a broadly thematic approach to the subject of the Irish in Britain looking at set topics each week across the chronological range. By doing so, it provides students with a wide-ranging and comparative historical perspective on issues such as: changing motivations for migration; evolving patterns of transport and settlement; shifting social and political influences; the development of differing cultural identities and expression. In addition to looking at relations between migrant and host communities, the course also explores interactions between the Irish in Britain and the Irish in Ireland and investigates how the relationship between those who leave and those who stay is reflected in the social, political and cultural domains. A strong emphasis of the course will be access to archival records and collections in order to provide students with the opportunity to directly consult contemporaneous documentation and other audio-visual materials. The course will conclude with a review of the key themes and an assessment of the current position of the Irish in Britain in relation to the wider Irish diaspora.

Sample Syllabus


Linguistics

Accra

Examines gender from a multidisciplinary perspective and in particular as a
sociolinguistic variable in speech behavior. How do linguistic practices both reflect
and shape our gender identity, and how do these reflect more global socio-cultural
relationships between the sexes? Do women and men talk differently? To what degree
do these differences seem to be universal or variable across cultures? How do dominant
gender-based ideologies function to constrain women and men’s choices about their
gender identities and gender relationships? How does gendered language intersect with
race and class-linked language? How is it challenged by linguistic “gender bending”?
What impact does gendered language have on the power relationships in given societies?
Also examines gendered voices—and silences—in folklore and in literature. Asks how
particular linguistic practices contribute to the production of people as “women and
men”?


Mathematics

Berlin

Prerequisite: MATH-UA 122 Calculus II, MATH-UA 123 Calculus III and MATH-UA 140 Linear Algebra with a grade of C or better or the equivalent.

First and second order equations. Series solutions. Laplace transforms. Introduction to partial differential equations and Fourier series.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: MATH-UA 121 Calculus I, MATH-UA 122 Calculus II and MATH-UA 123 Calculus III or equivalents with a grade of C or better.

Formulation and analysis of mathematical models. Mathematical tool include dimensional analysis, optimization, simulation, probability, and elementary differential equations. Applications to biology, sports, economics, and other areas of science. The necessary mathematical and scientific background will be developed as needed. Students will participate in formulating models as well as in analyzing them.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra and Calculus with a grade of C or higher or passing placement exam.

This course is only open to Economics Policy Majors and prospective majors.

This course introduces calculus for real valued functions of a single real variable and of several real variables. In particular, it shows how calculus can be used to solve optimization problems for these functions, including constrained optimization problems which can be solved by substitution. A substantial number of economic examples will be analyzed during the course.

 

 

 

London

This course is currently under development.  Please find below a sample course description from the MATH-UA 211 course offered in New York.  Please note that the actual description for this course may vary.

Elements of calculus and linear algebra are important to the study of economics. This class is designed to provide the appropriate tools for study in the policy concentration. Examples and motivation are drawn from important topics in economics. Topics covered include derivatives of functions of one and several variables; interpretations of the derivatives; convexity; constrained and unconstrained optimization; series, including geometric and Taylor series; ordinary differential equations; matrix algebra; eigenvalues; and (possibly) dynamic optimization and multivariable integration.

 


Photography

Florence

 A digital SLR camera is required.

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Students should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

The course Photojournalism: Exploring Italian Society focuses on the contemporary life of Florence, a city best known as a UNESCO World Heritage site, but that is also a European city attempting to rise to the challenges that currently confront other urban environments throughout Europe and the world. The course draws its strengths from the unique resources of the program and the city of Florence. From Italian labor protests, to commemoration of historic events, to immigrant populations, mass transit and tourism, Florence has many compelling contemporary visual stories to tell. Students have the unique opportunity to capture these issues in images.

Sample Syllabus

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice, covering the theoretical connections between architecture and photography. Through course assignments students will learn to confront a variety of challenges presented by photographing different architectural styles. By the end of the course, each student will have produced a portfolio of architectural photography.

This is an intermediate photography course. Each student must have basic knowledge of digital photographic techniques and their own digital camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed. The course is a combination of lectures and labs for a total of six hours per week.

Sample Syllabus


Physics

Florence

Prerequisite: Classical and Quantum Waves (PHYS-UA 105)

Course Description:

Particle physics is the study of the very fundamental constituents of matter and of the forces between them. By its nature it is microscopic, but it also connects with astrophysics and cosmology on the largest scales. This course introduces the most important advances in elementary particle physics. It centers on journal articles in which these advances were first published, with overview lectures, original reading, discussion, and student presentations. Topics include the discovery of elementary particles in cosmic rays, antimatter, symmetries found in nature, and the invention of the Quark model of elementary particles and its experimental verification. A field trip with a visit to CERN is planned for the course.

Sample Syllabus

Course Description:

In addition to the magnifi cent flowering of the arts in the Renaissance, the Renaissance period was also one of extraordinary advance in science, in particular in astronomy and physics. The course
will examine this advance, emanating from the scientific developments in the European and Italian centers of learning during the Renaissance and at the start of the Age of Enlightenment, in the light of prior wisdom. The topics will center on the 'Copernican Revolution' of Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, and Galileo Galilei that was the beginning of observational science and astronomy.

The course is a combined science and science-history course, open to all students, including non-science majors, with no prerequisites. Physics majors will attend an extra recitation to receive elective credit toward the major.

Sample Syllabus


Politics

Washington, D.C.

The "Arab Spring" unleashed a new dynamic across the Middle East - one in which Arab public opinion has emerged as a factor requiring the attention of political leadership. This is true not only for Arab governments, but for decision-makers and analysts in the West.

The goal of this course will be to examine the role public opinion is playing in shaping on-going developments in Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, the relationships between several Arab states and Iran and Turkey, and efforts to achieve a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

We will explore the use of up-to-date polling in all these countries to better understand how Arabs: see themselves, view their governments, prioritize their political concerns, and get and use information. We will also examine the misconceptions about Arabs that have long shaped policies that the West has adopted toward the Arab World - leading to the deep divide that defines our current relationship with that region.

Syllabus

 

 


Psychology

London

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course will cover historical and contemporary scientific approaches to understanding prejudice, specifically prejudice that exists between social groups (for example, ethnic prejudice, religious prejudice, etc.) across different cultures. Readings will draw from the literature in psychological science, and will cover topics including the origins of prejudice, the justification of prejudice, the different forms of prejudicial expression, the identification of prejudice in individuals and institutions, the consequences of being a victim of prejudice, and the value (or not) of different prejudice reduction strategies.

Sydney

Fundamental principles of psychology, with emphasis on basic research and applications in psychology's major theoretical areas of study: thought, memory, learning, perception, personality, social processes, development, and the physiological bases of psychology. Direct observation of methods of investigation by laboratory demonstrations and by student participation in current research projects.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course advances the understanding of major principles and findings of social psychology. This course will specifically discuss four main areas: (1) the science of social psychology; (2) the individual within the social world; (3) the impact individuals have on another individual or group; and (4) social relationships.

The course will be in lecture format, but class discussion and participation is expected. Therefore, preparation prior to each class is necessary.

Sample Syllabus

 

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course is a survey of cognitive psychology, the scientific study of the human mind and human thinking. During the course of the semester we will discuss many different aspects of cognition: perception, attention, memory, language, concepts, reasoning, problem solving, expertise, creativity, and decision making. The emphasis in the course will be on how psychologists have used experiments to help construct theories of how the human mind works and how human thinking occurs. The class will involve lectures, student presentations, discussion, video material to accompany lectures, and occasional example class experiments. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and conduct an empirical study, which they write up in a research report.

Sample Syllabus


Public Policy

Washington, D.C.

Course description and syllabus will be based on the course below. Exact description and syllabus will differ slightly.

This course is a gateway into the complex process of public policymaking, involving political and moral choices, along with analytic, administrative, historical, social and even psychological aspects. The course explores how the real world contexts in which public policymaking plays out – whether at the city, national, or global level – shape the ends, means and prospects for government action; and how patterns in policymaking in turn channel and shape today’s politics.

Sample Syllabus


Spanish

Buenos Aires

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200 or permission of the instructor.

This course seeks to familiarize students with the historical, geographical, ethnic, and socio-linguistic factors that contributed to the large variety of Spanish dialects spoken in the Americas. Why do people in Costa Rica speak like those in Uruguay and not like their neighbors in Panama? Why do Colombians have a different vocabulary in Bogotá and in Cartagena de Indias? Or when are “tú”, “usted” or “vos” used as forms of addressing people, and by whom? A web of factors combined to create a wide range of variations to the Castilian Spanish brought to America, itself the result of drastic changes since its evolution from its Latin roots.

The course is organized in four modules. Starting with the study of the origins of the language spoken by the colonizers arriving from Spain since the end of the fifteenth century, the first module will deal with the development of the distinct dialectal zones emerging in Spanish America through the intersection of political and geographical factors with the sociological, cultural and linguistic influence of indigenous and African groups. From the vantage point of standard Castilian Spanish, in the second module we will study the phonic, morpho-syntactic, lexical, and semantic changes undergone by the language, resulting in the distinct variations spoken today. The third module will cover the dialects of five salient geo-linguistic areas of Spanish America, through a historical overview of each region and its specific linguistic characteristics. We will complete this analysis in the fourth module, with a brief overview of the Spanish spoken in the United States, and the new “dialect”, Spanglish, that has emerged from it.

Sample Syllabus


Teaching and Learning / Applied Psychology

Accra

Students enrolling in the Human Development course sequence must register for both APSY-UE 9020 Human Development I and one of the Human Development II sections (APSY-UE 9021, 9022, or 9023). Human Development I runs for the first 7 weeks of the semester followed by Human Development II. All sections of Human Development II will meet together for class sessions however classroom observations and assignments will be differentiated.

Students enrolling in the Human Development course sequence must also conduct observations in an Accra school classroom each week.

Introduction to research and theory of human development across the life span. Seminal theories & basic research of individual growth & development are analyzed & critiqued. Emphasis is on the range in human development with discussion of normative & non-normative development. Emphasis is also placed on the importance of understanding the influence of normative & non-normative contexts of development, including the impact of culture, heritage, socioeconomic level, personal health, & safety. Relations between home, school, & community and their impact on development are also explored via readings, lectures, discussions, & weekly observations in the field. Interrogation of implicit folk theories as a foundation for exploration of formal knowledge of human development.

Sample Syllabus

Further analysis of research findings & theories of human development focusing on early childhood, & applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include: language development, assessment of readiness to learn, separation from the family, peer relationships, aesthetic experiences. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive & dangerous environments, & of alcohol, tobacco & drug use will also be included. Direct application of theory & research is made through field-based inquiry & issue-based investigation.

Sample Syllabus - Note Sample Syllabus is from NYU London, Sample NYU Accra syllabus will be posted when available.

Further analysis of research findings & theories of human development focusing on childhood, & applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include: numeric competence, assessment of reading problems, gender differences in learning styles. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive & dangerous environments, & of alcohol, tobacco, & drug use will also be included. Direct application of theory & research is made through field-based inquiry & issue-based investigation.

Sample Syllabus - Note Sample Syllabus is from NYU London, Sample NYU Accra syllabus will be posted when available.

Further analysis of research findings & theories of human development focusing on early through late adolescence & applied across various institutional contexts. Important issues include puberty, cross-gender peer relations, preventing risky behaviors, understanding & mastering test-based graduation requirements, transition to work/college, identity development, depression, & aggression. Developmentally appropriate consideration of abusive & dangerous environments & of alcohol, tobacco, & drug use is also included. Direct application of theory & research is made through field-based inquiry & issue-based investigation.

Sample Syllabus - Note Sample Syllabus is from NYU London, Sample NYU Accra syllabus will be posted when available.

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