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New Courses - Fall 2014

What's new at the Global Academic Centers?

As NYU's Global Network grows we're constantly adding new courses to the curriculum at our sites abroad. The list below are the newest course offerings that we're excited to add to the curriculum. 

NOTE: This is not a complete list of courses, only what's recently been added, to view all Fall 2014 courses view the Fall 2014 courses page here.

NYU's Global Academic Centers offer a wide variety of course offerings from undergraduate departments across the university.  The list below organizes all of the Global course offerings by their sponsoring department.  Use the dropdown menu below or the links to the right to view a specific department.  Course offerings organized by location can be found on the course offerings page for each Global Academic Center.

Students: Keep in mind that departments sometimes give major, minor, or university core credit for courses outside the department.  Always consult your academic advisor when planning your time away. 

Please note: Since the deparmental structure at NYU Abu Dhabi does not align with the academic departments at NYU New York, NYU Abu Dhabi courses are not included in the list below, but can be found here. NYU Shanghai courses sponsored by departments from NYU New York are listed below. In addition, a select group of courses from NYU Shanghai departments are open to Study Away students. These courses are included on the NYU Shanghai course listing webpage here but not on the list below.

For questions regarding the course offerings below, please contact global.academics@nyu.edu

Fall 2014 | Spring 2015

 

Art and Arts Professions

Florence

Basic materials & methods of drawing. It combines perceptual learning with initial conceptual basics for drawing. This includes line usage, shape inventing, size differentiating, brightness contrast, location &
overlap. Students will develop the skill to discuss their drawings as well as the drawings of others, & learn to observe & empathize with the genres of landscape, still-life, & figure. Individual & group critiques, slide lectures, & museum & gallery visits support studio activities.

Sample Syllabus Coming Soon


Art History

Washington, DC

Examines the art that developed in what is now the United States, from the beginnings of European colonization until World War I and the internationalizing of American art. Washington. DC provides major
collections of painting and sculpture as well as outstanding examples of architecture.

 

 

London

Please note that this course is currently under development. Actual course description may vary.

The course is designed as an introduction to museum studies through the study of London Museums. We will cover the types and definitions of museums, using key London collections, such as the British Museum and the Tate as well as smaller collections such as the Wallace Collection.

The course will introduce contemporary theories and practices in museology, examine how collections evolve, interrogate the role of individual collectors, study the specific character of the permanent and temporary exhibitions, and discuss the relationship between museums, cultures, and society. We will examine current issues in the museum profession as it faces the future of museums in the twenty-first century.


Business

Prague

Provides the background necessary to make decisions about computer-based information systems and to be an “end-user”. Two major parts of the course are hands-on experience with personal computers and information systems management. Group and individual computer assignments expose students to electronic spreadsheet analysis and database management on a personal computer. Management aspects focus on understanding computer technology, systems analysis and design, and control of information processing by managers. 

This course is being offered at NYU Prague for the first time in Fall 2014. The Syllabus should closely resemble the following sample from NYU in New York:

Sample Syllabus from New York

Washington, DC

An introduction to the area of financial accounting. Encompasses accounting concepts from the point of view of the corporate investor and business management. Accounting procedures are discussed to facilitate the comprehension of the recording, summarizing, and reporting of business transactions. The basic principles of asset valuation and revenue and cost recognition are presented. Various asset, liability, and capital accounts are studied in detail with emphasis on an analytical and interpretive approach. The area of financial accounting is further analyzed through a discussion of the concepts and underlying financial statement analysis and the exposition of funds flow.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: FINC-UB 2 or FINC-UB 9002 (Foundations of Finance)

This course helps students develop an analytical framework for understand-ing how organizations make investments and financial decisions. Students also learn the theory and practice of various valuation techniques. There is an emphasis on understanding the theory and its applications to the real world as well as appreciating the limitations of the tools in practical settings. Specific topics include capital budgeting,investment decision rules, discounted cash flow valuation, real options, cost
of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, and valuation methods.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


CAS Non-Departmental Courses

Berlin

Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

Course is currently under development.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 12 -15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by Cultural Vistas, an organization partnering with NYU. Cultural Vistas provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Arts and Museums
Public Policy & Government
Communication and Public Relations
Education
Non-Profits & Civic Engagement
Environment & Sustainability
STEM

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Interested Fall 2014 NYU Berlin students should complete the online application by Friday, April 11th. Please note, students must have language proficiency of at least Intermediate II German to be eligible for this internship program. For more information on the application process and deadlines, please visit the NYU Berlin Internship website.

 

Sydney

Course is currently under development.  Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by CAPA International (CAPA), an organization partnering with NYU. CAPA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Advertising
Business
Broadcasting
Education
Engineering
Film
Healthcare
Hospitality
Journalism
Politics and International Relations
Public Relations
Social Sciences

The internship course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.


Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies

Sydney

This course is currently under development. 

Prerequisite: PSYCH-UA 1/Intro to Psychology

While psychopathology courses are commonplace among undergraduate psychology curricula, courses focusing on child and adolescent psychopathology are relatively rare. More novel still is the opportunity to receive instruction in child and adolescent psycho pathology from practicing psychiatrists and psychologists at an internationally renowned clinical and research center. Through lecture presentations and discussions, this course will focus on disease etiology, epidemiology, phenomenology, nosology, and diagnosis. We will engage students in a critical review of common child and adolescent psychopathology and challenge social and cultural assumptions of what constitutes “normal” vs. “pathological” behavior, cognition, and emotion.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Drama

Berlin

This course examines German theater of the twentieth century, from Expressionism to contemporary postdramatic forms of writing and performance. The course will first offer an overview of German theater traditions before 1900 and will then engage in analyzing specific developments in German theater starting with Max Reinhardt and his work at the Deutsches Theater Berlin. Other case studies will focus on Brecht’s epic theater, theater during the Third Reich, postwar theater trends in East and West Germany, and current developments in reunified Germany. Not only will we closely read relevant plays and theory by the theater makers of the respective periods but we will also explore aesthetics and performance issues as they have changed over time. As the involved practice of dramaturgy in Germany has greatly influenced theatrical developments, we will investigate this major aspect of theatrical work in Germany as a contribution to world theater and study how the extensive debate of ideas is being concretely realized in the theater through the choices being made in a production. An integral part of the course will include visits to Berlin theaters, attending performances, which we will analyze in class, and engaging in discussion with contemporary theater makers in Berlin.



Economics

Washington, DC

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisite: ECON-UA 9001, Economic Principles or ECON-UA 9005, Introduction to Economic Analysis

The principal characteristics of the financial system and its current challenges; derivatives, financial innovation and the banking industry; money supply and monetary policy; bonds, equities and interest rates; financial supervision and regulation; pricing of financial securities and balanced portfolios; foreign exchange and how currency markets impact policy and asset choices; international policy co-ordination; banking crises and reform programs.


Environmental Studies

Berlin

Washington, DC

This survey course will focus on the historical development of U.S. federal authority and capacity over public lands and resources, including the germination and expansion of the idea of a coherent public interest with respect to air, water, forests, landscapes, and other environmental attributes. The course will address U.S. environmental policy through several lenses, including (1) a set of two introductory sessions in which students are introduced to key terminology, concepts, and orientations toward the domain of environmental policy; (2) a core series of fourteen sessions through which we survey how historical precedents have shaped contemporary U.S. environmental policies and programs; and (3) a concluding set of three sessions through which we review several unfolding environmental policy topics (e.g., climate change, invasive species, or hydraulic fracturing).


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Berlin

Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

Course is currently under development.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 12 -15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by Cultural Vistas, an organization partnering with NYU. Cultural Vistas provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Arts and Museums
Public Policy & Government
Communication and Public Relations
Education
Non-Profits & Civic Engagement
Environment & Sustainability
STEM

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Interested Fall 2014 NYU Berlin students should complete the online application by Friday, April 11th. Please note, students must have language proficiency of at least Intermediate II German to be eligible for this internship program. For more information on the application process and deadlines, please visit the NYU Berlin Internship website.

 

Florence

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in Florence Program will be given registration priority for this course.

Global Fashion Industry: Italy will provide students with a deep understanding of the contemporary fashion industry in Italy, as well as of Italy's position in the global fashion arena. The course will drive students through the entire lifecycle of the fashion business, from forecasting trends to retailing, through design, sourcing, product development and production. Particular attention will be dedicated to different marketing aspects of the process, such as: identity building, brand positioning, merchandising, buying, costing, communication. All levels of retail, from luxury to mass market will be covered. The course will end with an analysis of the new challenges, such as sourcing globalization, emerging markets, sustainability and growing significance of technology.
A strong effort will be put into organizing site visits to studios, showrooms and factories, as well as meeting with professional players.

Each session will be structured to give students an overview of a particular stage of the Industry, through a mix of lectures from the course leader and visiting professionals, studio and showroom visits, walking tours, reading assignments and practical projects.  Conducted in English.

Sydney

Course is currently under development.  Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by CAPA International (CAPA), an organization partnering with NYU. CAPA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Advertising
Business
Broadcasting
Education
Engineering
Film
Healthcare
Hospitality
Journalism
Politics and International Relations
Public Relations
Social Sciences

The internship course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.


German Studies

Berlin

This course examines German theater of the twentieth century, from Expressionism to contemporary postdramatic forms of writing and performance. The course will first offer an overview of German theater traditions before 1900 and will then engage in analyzing specific developments in German theater starting with Max Reinhardt and his work at the Deutsches Theater Berlin. Other case studies will focus on Brecht’s epic theater, theater during the Third Reich, postwar theater trends in East and West Germany, and current developments in reunified Germany. Not only will we closely read relevant plays and theory by the theater makers of the respective periods but we will also explore aesthetics and performance issues as they have changed over time. As the involved practice of dramaturgy in Germany has greatly influenced theatrical developments, we will investigate this major aspect of theatrical work in Germany as a contribution to world theater and study how the extensive debate of ideas is being concretely realized in the theater through the choices being made in a production. An integral part of the course will include visits to Berlin theaters, attending performances, which we will analyze in class, and engaging in discussion with contemporary theater makers in Berlin.



Global Public Health

Accra

This course will examine some of the key issues and principles of environmental health practice. It will focus on the how environmental health issues are defined and approached by civic groups, governmental officials and researchers. It will highlight how environmental threats come to the attention of the public and weigh the options for addressing these threats. Finally, it will underscore the need for multi-disciplinary approaches in understanding these threats and crafting solutions. We will focus on prevention of environmentally mediated diseases and discuss challenges to effective prevention.

 

Buenos Aires

This course is currently marked as tentative, pending the approved appointemnt of an instructor.

This course introduces students to key concepts in health policy formation, implementation and evaluation in a global context. Using a comparative lens, students explore organization, financing and delivery of health care services and health systems around the world. We examine the role of governmental and non-governmental agencies in delivering care and contributing to a health care infrastructure using case studies and other materials in a comparative approach. Key lessons in the implementation of new health policies and initiatives are explored across the developing world, as well as in a US as students explore health system performance, the quality and cost of care, the management of health care services, the process of health improvement and health reform. The course will use a multidisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economics, and ethical perspectives. The objective is to build an understanding of the fundamental ideas, issues, and problems currently debated in global health policy and management and to provide a foundation for future studies and careers in the global health field. Epidemiology in a Global World and Health and Society in a Global Context are recommended but not required pre-requisites for the course.

London

Please note that this course is currently under development.  Actual course description may vary.

This course will examine the various dimensions of the field of public health and how the public’s health is protected. Students explore the ways social, economic, and political forces influence the health of populations. Additionally, this course will focus upon some of the current ethical public health dilemmas where the rights of the individual versus the rights of society come into conflict. The course makes use of diverse methods of instruction, including, but not limited to, small group discussion, group exercises, mini-lectures, student debates, field-based group projects and student presentations. Students may be involved in gathering information and observations from projects outside of the classroom at government, NGO and health care institutions.

Sydney

Please note that this course is currently under development. Actual course description may vary.

By the end of this course students will develop the ability to understand the evolution and current role of epidemiology as an approach to assessing public health problems; describe epidemiological approaches to defining and measuring health problems in defined populations; understand how epidemiologic studies are designed, implemented and analyzed; understand the concepts of measurement of test performance and be able to apply these concepts of testing and screening in a range of health and other settings; understand and apply epidemiological criteria needed to establish cause and effect relationships; understand, and apply key ethical issues to the conduct of epidemiological and other scientific investigations; conduct library research to find information on diseases and other health conditions; and critically read and understand health information.

Sample Syllabus coming soon.


History

Washington, DC

Immigration: An American History” as its title declares, will explore the process of immigration to the United States, and indeed to British North America in the period before national independence. It will focus on the waves of women and men from abroad who decided to leave their homes and settle here. We will examine this phenomenon historically, taking a chronological perspective, and will ask such questions as who came, from where, when, why, and how did the nature of their migrations shape the ways in which they constructed ethnicity once in America. How did continued immigration shape the ethnic communities which developed in the United States and how did it foster both conflict and communal co-operation? We will be looking at this phenomenon from the seventeenth century onward until the present as we also analyze how the larger American society reacted to these newcomers, and how Americans evaluated some immigrants as worthy of admission, capable of achieving citizenship, and able to access economic opportunities. That is we will think systematically about the ways in which outside forces –particularly American mainstream public opinion, policy making, and law-- molded the process of immigration and in turn how they left their mark on the immigrants themselves as they constructed their communities in America. We will pay particular attention to changing laws as they impacted the very flows of immigrants and how immigrants responded.

This survey course will focus on the historical development of U.S. federal authority and capacity over public lands and resources, including the germination and expansion of the idea of a coherent public interest with respect to air, water, forests, landscapes, and other environmental attributes. The course will address U.S. environmental policy through several lenses, including (1) a set of two introductory sessions in which students are introduced to key terminology, concepts, and orientations toward the domain of environmental policy; (2) a core series of fourteen sessions through which we survey how historical precedents have shaped contemporary U.S. environmental policies and programs; and (3) a concluding set of three sessions through which we review several unfolding environmental policy topics (e.g., climate change, invasive species, or hydraulic fracturing).


Journalism

Washington, DC

This lecture course will introduce you to issues in journalistic writing and reporting, such as the choices journalists face in method, style, and form; the political impact of the news media; questions of sensationalism, bias, and diversity, and the current digital upheaval.

 

Sample Course Syllabus from NYU New York

This will be a hands-on course examining the role of journalism in society and Washington, DC in particular, examining how people here manipulate facts to fit a world view. It is about truth and truthiness and how to tell the difference. It will be part overview and lecture on topics central to the course and part active reporting and writing. To take advantage of the unique Washington location and distinct attitude in the city, students will participate in press conferences and go to public hearings on Capitol Hill in reporting roles and then write news-style articles. The class will include a focus on the 2014 midterm elections. Invited guest speakers are from NASA, NOAA, environmental activist groups, energy lobbyists and Washington media. The intersection of the media with science, politics and economics on the issue of global warming will be a focal point of this course.

Sample Syllabus

 


Liberal Studies

Washington, DC

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in literature, music, and the visual and performing arts from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on global developments in culture.

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in philosophy, theology, history, and political science from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on major world discourses about the nature of human identity and society through a comparative study of seminal texts.

 


Philosphy

An introduction to philosophy through the study of issues in cognitive science. Topics may include the conflict between computational and biological approaches to the mind; whether a machine could think; the reduction of the mind to the brain; connectionism and neural nets. Gives training in philosophical argument and writing.

 


Psychology

Sydney

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course provides a detailed introduction to the major topics in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including perception, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making. The course will discuss cutting-edge developments from research using behavioural, neuroimaging, and clinical methods. The class will involve lectures, student presentations, discussion, video material to accompany lectures, and occasional example class experiments. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and conduct an empirical study, which they write up in a research report.

Sample Syllabus


Direct Enrollment Opportunities

Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv University (TAU) is Israel's largest higher education institution and is home to 30,000 students studying in the academic areas of science, humanities and the arts.  As of Spring 2014, NYU is pleased to make available a new opportunity for students enroll in a course for NYU credit at TAU. This exciting  opportunity will allow students to engage with local students in the classroom.

Course Descriptions coming soon.


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