New York University Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Navigation Skip to Sub Navigation

Courses - Fall 2014

NYU's Global Academic Centers offer a wide variety of course offerings from undergraduate departments across the University.  The list below organizes all of the Global course offerings by their sponsoring department.  Use the dropdown menu below or the links to the right to view a specific department.  Course offerings organized by location can be found on the courses page for each Global Academic Center.

Students: Keep in mind that departments sometimes give major, minor, or university core credit for courses outside the department.  Always consult your academic advisor when planning your time away. 

Please note: Since the departmental structure at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai does not align with the academic departments at NYU New York, courses sponsored by departments at these campuses are not listed here. NYU Abu Dhabi courses can be found here. NYU Shanghai courses sponsored by departments from NYU New York are listed below. In addition, a select group of courses from NYU Shanghai departments are open to Study Away students. These courses are included on the NYU Shanghai course listing webpage here but not on the list below.

Fall 2014 courses with days, times, and instructors are available in Albert, NYU's Student Information System. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.

For questions regarding the course offerings below, please contact global.academics@nyu.edu

Africana Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Accra

Using a variety of paradigms, this course explores a broad range of popular musical forms in sub-Saharan Africa as stylistic areas. Southern, Central, East and West Africa (Francophone and Anglophone) musical styles are considered. The historical scope of the inquiry extends from 19th century to the present. The investigation seeks to highlight the relationships among popular music, traditional performance, and the social and cultural forces of modernization.

Sample Syllabus

 

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Sample Syllabus

This is an interdisciplinary course designed to study the life and times, intellectual thought and practical activity, of Ghana’s first president, Kwame Nkrumah.  With the use of a variety of readings and audio-visual materials, this course will critically explore the socioeconomic and political factors that served to shape the life, thought, and times of Kwame Nkrumah.  The persons, ideas, and events that influenced Nkrumah and the ideas, persons and events that he also impacted will be covered as well.  Students interested in sociology, history, political science, economics, and cultural studies will find this course of particular interest as its subject matter will dovetail into each of these related fields of study.

Sample Syllabus

The course introduces students to aspects of Ghanaian society and culture. It considers both traditional aspects of life and how people live their lives in this first decade of the new millennium. How Ghanaians perceive and conceive themselves and their society; how others view the society and life of Ghanaians also receive critical attention. The course emphasizes that Ghanaians are not an undifferentiated lot and that what the different people say their behavior should be differs from what their actual behavior is. Students will get to examine these varied perceptions and perspectives as well as construct their own representations of the society. The course will also attempt to answer questions about Ghana and Ghanaians that are of interest to the non-Ghanaian getting acquainted with the country. The course combines talks, readings, discussions, visits, and students' presentations in class. There will be a written examination at the end of the semester and a dissertation on an aspect of Ghanaian society and culture that students might choose to explore.

Sample Syllabus

Note: this course is open to all students for elective credit. Comparative
literature majors in track ii (literary and cultural studies) may count this
course toward one of their non-core major requirements.

The course examines certain recurring themes and critical issues in post-colonial narratives in Africa. It begins with a look at the debate and polemics around post-colonialism as a critical and theoretical concept. It then dwells on specific narratives, mainly novels by African writers, works located in the period following classical colonialism. The reading of these narratives is informed by such critical issues as the crisis of cultures in contact; personal, class, ethnic and national identities; the politics of gender; debates over language; the aesthetics and politics of art; strategic transformations in narrative form, etc.

Sample Syllabus

This is a language course designed to provide basic communicative competence in oral and written Twi for beginners. It focuses on the structure of the language as well as the culture of the people. The areas covered include: (i) oral drills; (ii) orthography; (iii) written exercises; (iv)translation from English to Twi and from Twi to English; (v) reading and comprehension; (vi) conversation and narration involving dialogues, greetings, description of day to day activities and bargaining); (vii) Grammar (parts of speech—nouns, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, particles, determiners, tense/aspect, and question forms); (viii) Composition writing.

Sample Syllabus

London

Introduces students to the tools of cultural criticism and theory, with particular emphasis on black culture, urban environment, and black people’s relationships to a variety of social and cultural institutions and practices. The latter may include the mass media, class and poverty, the police, urban development, education, music, art, and sports. 

Sample Syllabus

This course provides students with knowledge of the diverse literatures composed and written in indigenous languages of Africa, as well as of the general issues relevant to the study of this literature. The languages covered include Swahili (East Africa), Hausa and Yoruba (Nigeria and West Africa), Xhosa (Southern Africa), and Somali (Horn of Africa). The literature is discussed largely according to major genre types, such as poetry and song, oral narratives, and written prose literature. No knowledge of these languages is required for the course. 

The course familiarizes students with a selection of the varying perspectives from which African experience has been perceived, analyzed, and interpreted, primarily by Africans and persons of African descent, both on the continent and in the diaspora. 

An introduction to thinking about the human faculty of language within a specifically African context. The course focuses on issues of language within the framework of human society at all levels, and not so much on language as a structural entity. Topics include the general characteristics of human language; the description of the languages of Africa; the question of language and cultural contact in Africa; and the contemporary issues of language and sociopolitics in Africa. 

The course examines not only the common concerns but also the diverse traditions, as a result of historical, social, and cultural imperatives, that have informed the literature produced by African writers. Topics include colonialism; the question of language; race and identity; nationalism and literature; modernity; exile; and the politics of gender in the African context. 

The aim of the course is to introduce students to cultural dimensions in Africa, and to ways of approaching the study of culture in Africa. It focuses on three overall themes: orality, performance and identity, exploring ways in which these find expression primarily (though not exclusively) through language, religious belief, music, literature, nationalism, and popular culture. After presenting a general theoretical framework for the study of the themes, it concentrates on specific cultural contexts, illustrated with "case studies". Students are also encouraged to do further reading within other culture areas of Africa and the African Diaspora. 

Paris

A historical and political inquiry into the French system of relations with Francophone Africa from the ‘race to Empire’ in the 19th century to the current day. The main goals of the course are: to describe the historical development of French-African relations from the colonial to the post-independence era; to investigate the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of French influence in contemporary Francophone Africa; to understand the consequences for France of complex developments subsequent to colonialism, such as African immigration in France. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus


Anthropology

Prague

The course will introduce students to the development of Romany politics and culture from a persecuted minority through to the emergence of Romany organizations with an emphasis on Central and Eastern Europe. The aim is to challenge any essentializing view on Roma as either a people outside or/and without society or as perennial victims of oppression. Two main approaches have dominated the teaching of Romany issues: a culturalist/ethnic approach, which stresses Romany cultures, and an economistic approach, which stresses ´poverty´.  This course will challenge mono-causal and a-historic explanations for the social situation of Roma and will stimulate students to think about Roma in a critical holistic way that brings into consideration the societies they live in. Building on a diverse selection of empirical material, ranging from ethnographic, historical and sociological case studies to artistic representations of Roma, the course will present the Roma “as good to think” for our comprehension of current social issues. The course is divided into three interconnected thematic blocks – 1. Identity, community and culture, 2. Power, the State and social stratification, 3. History, memory and politics of representation – which will allow to cover much of the current debates on the plight of European Roma as well as a grasp of social theories on marginality.

Syllabus

Sydney

This course offers an introduction to some of the classical and current issues in the anthropology of
Indigenous Australia. The role of anthropology in the representation and governance of Indigenous
life is itself an important subject for anthropological inquiry, considering that Indigenous people of
Australia have long been the objects of interest and imagination by outsiders for their cultural
formulations of kinship, ritual, art, gender, and politics. These representations—in feature films
about them (such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and Australia), New Age Literature (such as Mutant
Message Down Under), or museum exhibitions (such as in the Museum of Sydney or the Australian
Museum—are now also in dialogue with Indigenous forms of cultural production, in genres as
diverse as film, television, drama, dance, and archiving. The course will explore how Aboriginal
people have struggled to reproduce themselves and their traditions on their own terms, asserting
their right to forms of cultural autonomy and self-determination. Through the examination of
ethnographic texts, historical accounts, films, live performances, and an autobiography, we will consider the ways in which Aboriginalities are being challenged and constructed in contemporary
Australia.

Sample Syllabus

 

This course is a survey of the principal themes and issues in the development of Indigenous art in Australia. It focuses on some of the regional and historical variations of Aboriginal art in the context of the history of a settler nation, while considering the issues of its circulation and evaluation within contemporary discourses of value. Topics include the cosmological dimensions of the art, its political implications, its relationship to cultural identity, and its aesthetic frameworks. Students will visit some of the major national collections of Indigenous Australian art as well as exhibitions of contemporary works. There will also be guest presentations from Indigenous artists and Indigenous art curators.

Sample Syllabus


Art and Arts Professions

Berlin

The course, ‘Image and Process’ will examine the relationship between image,
made by camera and other photographic means, and process, whereby a
transformation occurs and ideas, both formal and conceptual emerge. Berlin,
a city in constant transformation itself, offers an enormous variety of sites and
layers of history, providing locations and ambience for both an environmental
as well as personal investigation into identity. The emphasis of the course will
be on learning to see and to develop one’s own personal viewpoint.

Sample Syllabus

This course will carry a supplies & studio fee for all non-Steinhardt Studio Art majors. More details will be available soon.

Intended for Studio Art students to work on projects over the course of the semester under the guidance of an artist mentor.

Sample Syllabus

Museums mount blockbuster shows. Rappers shoot videos in art galleries. Biennials
proliferate, art fairs geographically expand, and auction sales hit new records. At the
same time, public arts funding is systematically slashed, emerging artists still struggle,
and art criticism remains in its perpetual crisis. The international contemporary art
world is a convoluted interplay of aesthetics and economics; ego and idealism. Berlin’s
art world may be more production-based and experimental than the art scenes of other
major western cities, but it is still a microcosm of larger movements.
Through readings of art theory and criticism, discussions, site visits, guest speakers,
and short- and long-form response writing, this course offers an overview of the
conventions, trends, history, current developments and myriad structures and
substructures of the contemporary art world in general and Berlin’s in particular. The
course delves into contemporary art’s current prevailing discourse via methodological
analysis, practical observation, and input from professionals currently working in the
art’s institutional and commercial sectors. It also offers a critical look at how these
larger art-world structures translate to Berlin.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Basic materials & methods of drawing. It combines perceptual learning with initial conceptual basics for drawing. This includes line usage, shape inventing, size differentiating, brightness contrast, location &
overlap. Students will develop the skill to discuss their drawings as well as the drawings of others, & learn to observe & empathize with the genres of landscape, still-life, & figure. Individual & group critiques, slide lectures, & museum & gallery visits support studio activities.

Sample Syllabus Coming Soon

Prague

This course is a hands-on introduction to the use of photography as a medium of documentation and expression. Assignments and critiques enhance the development of independent individual work while developing photographic skills and techniques. Students provide their own cameras.

Syllabus

Shanghai

The contemporary art scene in China has developed quickly over the past three decades. The massive political, economic, and social changes the country has undergone since the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976 have dramatically altered the country’s cultural landscape. In this seminar course, the course will survey the main development areas in Chinese contemporary art from the end of the 1920s to the present day. Dedicated to responding to the new textures of China’s metropolitan culture, it will look at the relationship between visual arts, new media, architecture, and performance in the mega-city of Shanghai, often regarded as the cradle of Chinese modernity. The class will be complemented by guest lectures and visits to public museums, galleries and artists’ studios in and around Shanghai. Students will have the opportunity to meet leading figures from the art world in China as well as the international art community, including artists, museum directors, curators, art critics, and art dealers.

Sample Syllabus


Art History

Accra

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore Ghanaian art and art history in their historical, anthropological and archaeological contexts. The course serves both as a survey and critique of the literature on West African art, and as an exploration of method and theory in sub-Saharan art historical research. Students explore major works from key periods of Ghanaian artistic and cultural production and are involved in practical work in laboratories and museums dealing with art specimens from local archaeological sites and ethnographic contexts.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar.

Section A

Berlin is a unique modern Metropolis, its alternating history with often-drastic changes
offers a comprehensive background to explore and investigate the nature of
architecture in correlation to the various development processes of urban culture and life.
Architecture is embedded in the urban fabric for which place and time serve as main
threads, constantly changing their multifaceted and layered relationships. This urban
fabric provides the fertile soil for urban culture and life, which literally takes place in various scales
between the public and the private realm, two more threads intertwined to the urban fabric.
Experiencing the city through walking, is essential for learning how to observe, see
and read, "Place, Building and Time" in Berlin.
Tours will alternate with classroom discussions and workshops.

Sample Syllabus A


NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar.

The seminar consists mainly of field trips to different museums in Berlin, with a focus on the ensemble of five major art museums on "Museuminsel", which have been built over a period of 100 years.  Discussions will focus on the nature and social function of museums as well as their role as places where the image of the state and its civil society are constantly reshaped.  Other topics include museum architecture, collecting as a cultural technique, and Prussian-German intellectual history from the 18th to the 20th century.  Selected pieces from the rich collections of the Berlin museums will be closely examined.  Previous knowledge of art history, architecture, or German history is not required, but useful.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

This course studies modern and contemporary art and architecture through a strategic focus on the cities of Buenos Aires, New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City. We consider key artworks and architectural movements, approaching art history in urban, socio-historical and contextual terms. Emphasis is placed upon the city as a hub for the production and reception of art.

Sample Syllabus

 

Florence

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

NYU Students who have already taken ARTH-UA 2 will not receive major credit for ARTH-UA 5 [Renaissance Art survey] or ARTH-UA 6 [Modern Art survey].

The city of Florence will be the classroom as students study the masters, explore museums, examine texts, and analyze the historical significance of monuments. With eyes cast simultaneously on painting, the graphic arts, sculpture, and architecture, this class will explore a broad range of art patronage that included religious and civic bodies, princely courts, and a growing number of private clients. The course will focus on points of intersection, transition, and the transformations that lead from one tradition to the next. Above all, our approach will encourage critical thinking and a search for unifying connections in studying the underlying logic of image making. Works will be examined on their native terms: both as physical objects, with sensitivity to their particular function and intended reception, and as visual images active within larger contexts. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

This course provides students with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilization of ancient Italy from 1000 B.C. to 200 A.D. The lectures will examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning and the minor arts of the period. The course will include local field trips to important sites and exhibits. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

Prerequisite: ARTH-UA 0002 (History of Western Art II), or ARTH-UA 0005 (Renaissance Art), or AP Art History score of 5, or permission of the instructor. Students in the Art History Dept: This course counts for Advanced Renaissance/Baroque credit.

This course is conceived as a focused study of the works of Leonardo, Raphael and Michelangelo, the men whose careers largely defined the concept of Western artistic genius. Particular consideration will also be given to their Florentine contemporaries and followers in order to take advantage of the opportunity to the study these original works on site. Renaissance art cannot be divorced from its times; thus, much attention will be given to contemporary history, especially Florentine politics and politics in Papal Rome. Special attention will also be given to the evolution of drawing practice in sixteenth-century Italy, an essential development for the changes that took place in the conception of works of art over the course of the century.

Sample Syllabus

Starting from Villa La Pietra, this course explores the connection between the history of the Italian villa and the economy, architecture, art, and landscape. Historical and economic reasons have contributed to the unique typology of the Florentine landscape and the relationship between the villa, the farmer house and the "podere." The course examines the original development of the villa and the ideology of country life in Florentine culture and society. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

This course investigates the scope of Italian artistic ingenuity during the past century and a half and puts it in reference to contemporary art movements. Due to Italy’s strong historical legacy, modern Italian artists and architects have gone through an intense struggle to break from academic models. Initially the new movements, such as Impressionism and Art Nouveau, arrived from outside sources, yet beginning with I Macchiaoli, followed by the Futurists, Neo– Rationalists, Arte Povera, and Transavanguardia, Italians were frequently originators of the discourses of new artistic movements. The tide of trends periodically seceded from traditions and then returned to them in critical ways, seen in the metaphysical paintings of Giorgio de Chirico or the wistful pavilions of Aldo Rossi. During the past decade Italy has produced several new institutions for contemporary art and architecture, including MART in Rovereto, the Museo del ‘900 (Museum of the 20th century) in Milan, and MAXXI (Museum of the Arts of the 21st century), devoted specifically to both art and architecture, broadening the historical and critical perspective and providing a stimulus for the art of the future. The course includes two site visits in Florence, one day-trip to the Venice Biennale, one day-trip to Rome.

London

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

A survey of British painting, sculpture and architecture of the 17ththrough 20th centuries. Museums, galleries, churches, palaces and stately homes in and around London will be visited to examine and critique major works.

 

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

London has some of the richest collections of renaissance art in the world. Students in this course will be brought into direct contact with a large variety of artefacts to be found in museums and galleries such as the National Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Museum as well as the British Library. Works by Van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Durer and Holbein will be examined alongside those of less well-known artists. Rather than provide a standard chronological narrative of European Art History c. 1400- c. 1600, focus will be placed on subject areas such as the altarpiece and the private devotional image, the renaissance portrait, graphic practices, print culture, the materials and functions of sculpture, myth and allegory, the cabinet of curiosities, the concept of the 'Renaissance' itself. These topics will not be organised around traditional national or regional 'schools' considered in isolation from one another but instead interconnections will be explored between the development of different types, technical processes and cultural practices across the Netherlands, France, Germany and Italy. A special case will be made of the English Renaissance, in order to place it within the wider European context through additional visits to Westminster Abbey and Hampton Court. 

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History Elective credit & Urban Design credit.

British architecture is studied, from the Roman remains to the Post-Modern ITV Studios in London. Architecture, urban systems, preservation, and planning issues will be studied. While examining the past and present, the future of architecture will also be explored with an emphasis on the importance of renovating and refurbishing old buildings. There will be site visits in and around the City.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only.

London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape.

This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else. 

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

Contemporary art raises vigorous debate and criticism. But what is contemporary about contemporary art? This course introduces you to some of the key issues in dealing critically with contemporary art with a focus on work on display in exhibitions in London, both major national collections and private galleries. The course explores art produced since the late 1950s through case studies of the work of individual artists and through themes which include photography; representations of the body; gallery display; migration, visual imagery of political issues, video practice and installation art. Among other things we consider how contemporary art came to look as it does [with a focus on British art]; the different forms of material and presentation artists have employed; why and how diverse audiences are addressed; how markets, national prizes and private collections shape the kinds of art produced and inform public taste. We also look at the collection and display of contemporary art, on a private and a public scale; dealer galleries and issues of curation.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only

Re-cycling or re-using buildings is one of the most important subjects in the built environment. It is an area in which there have been some remarkable successes in recent years both in America and in Europe: impressive and much loved public buildings have been given new life by progressive architects and developers, helping ensure that our towns and cities retain their individual character. Unlike international modern buildings, historic buildings are strong markers of the industry, aspirations, local materials and resources of a particular place. Recycling old buildings is crucial so our architectural and social history can be read in the townscape that surrounds us.

A course about recycling old buildings presents an opportunity to explore some basic themes in the built environment – architecture history, environmental issues and the rise of the conservation movement in the 19th and 20th centuries. Buildings are responsible for 50% of our carbon emissions each year, and more than half of a building’s energy footprint is expended in the relatively short spell of its construction. Re-using our redundant historic architecture for new purposes has obvious positive benefits for the planet. Equally, upgrading historic buildings in use, like our housing stock, is environmentally smarter that demolishing parts of our cities and starting again with new structures.

The locations and nature of industrial production has changed across the world. Most western cities have a surfeit of industrial spaces and buildings lying empty, often in their centres. This course will first cover the story of the development of industrial architecture from the 18th century onwards and look at how these robust, proud and often highly decorative structures can accommodate new uses. Based in London, we will have the opportunity to visit a number of key examples of re-use where we can see first-hand how industrial history, modern technology and the changing use of our city centres combine to form this essential story in contemporary urbanism.  

Sample Syllabus

*Important note for students in the Art History Department: This course does not satisfy requirements for the major or minor in Art History or Urban Design.  

Please note that this course is currently under development. Actual course description may vary.

The course is designed as an introduction to museum studies through the study of London Museums. We will cover the types and definitions of museums, using key London collections, such as the British Museum and the Tate as well as smaller collections such as the Wallace Collection.

The course will introduce contemporary theories and practices in museology, examine how collections evolve, interrogate the role of individual collectors, study the specific character of the permanent and temporary exhibitions, and discuss the relationship between museums, cultures, and society. We will examine current issues in the museum profession as it faces the future of museums in the twenty-first century.

Madrid

 Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100 with permission of the director.

Art History Students: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

A gallery course focusing on the baroque schools of Rubens and Rembrandt, "tenebrist" painting, Velázquez, and the etchings and paintings of Goya. Ends with a survey of the painters of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Sample Syllabus

 Art History Students: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

A gallery course focusing on the baroque schools of Rubens and Rembrandt, "tenebrist" painting, Velázquez, and the etchings and paintings of Goya. Ends with a survey of the painters of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Sample Syllabus

Paris

This course examines medieval art and architecture of France through an exploration of the monuments and moments that define our understanding of the period. The course moves from the Merovingians of the 5th century to late Gothic of the 16th to help students gain an understanding of medieval France through an analysis of monuments in their historic and cultural contexts. From the portals of Notre-Dame of Paris to the collections of the Musée de Cluny, we will seek to decode the symbolic language of medieval sculpture and architecture. Pairing texts and monuments, we will consider the writings of authors such as the Abbot Suger as we inspect his church of Saint-Denis, or as we study liturgical objects in the collections of the Louvre. Throughout the course we will consider how visual art during the Middles Ages helped shape cultural identity and express the political and religious agendas of the age. The course ends with a study of E.E. Viollet-le-Duc’s work during the 19th century, together with his legacy and role in constructing our notions of medieval art and architecture.  Taught in English.

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Advanced Modern Credit.

This course examines the rise of realist and impressionist art in Europe within its cultural, historical and social contexts. The novelty of these two important movements is considered in relation to preceding artistic movements, namely neo-classicism and romanticism. Works by artists such as Delacroix, Courbet, Millet, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec are studied. The course includes both class lectures with slides and museum visits. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

Open to all NYU Paris students. For NYU Art History students this course counts for Art History Elective Credit.

This course investigates French art of the nineteenth-century, paying particular attention to the way in which historical factors informed artistic production during this period.  Beginning with David, Neo-Classicism and the French Revolution, we will move to the Napoleonic period, Romanticism, the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848, and trace the connection from Realism to Impressionism.  The second half of the course will examine the disparate movements spurred by Impressionism, collectively referred to as Post-Impressionism (including Neo-Impressionism, Synthetism, and Symbolism), and will culminate with the rise of Art Nouveau at the end of the century.  Throughout, we will interrogate how social forces (including politics, gender, race, religion, etc.) influenced the manner in which “Modern” art was produced and understood in nineteenth-century France. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

The course covers the history of architecture from Mediaeval to contemporary with special attention to 19th and 20th Century architecture and urbanism as well as the visual arts. The course begins with the pre-Romanesque and Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque and Classicism periods. The major focus will be on 19th and 20th Century architectural styles from Historicism and Art Nouveau through Cubism, Art-Déco, Avant-garde Functionalism, post-war Stalinist art and architecture, and the contemporary. It's necessary to have an understanding of the evolution of Mid European art and architecture, town planning and theory.

Syllabus

This course presents a survey of art and architecture in Prague and its environs - from the Middle Ages to the present - placed within the context of the main periods and movements of Western art history. The course will be rooted in a discussion of the city of Prague, and students are encouraged through excursions and assignments to become acquainted with the city's architecture, monuments and urban design. Students will learn to analyse formal aspects of art and architectural styles (from Romanesque to modern) and will also be encouraged to investigate their sources and theoretical foundations. Emphasis will be given to the historical and cultural context of art styles and movements. We will also look at art patronage in some key periods of Czech history to see how this reflects political, cultural and ideological change. Classroom lectures will be combined with regular excursions to examine works of art and architecture at first hand. These will include architectural walking tours and visits to temporary exhibitions as well as the city's major art galleries.

Syllabus


Asian/Pacific/American Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Sydney

This course will look at contemporary Australian society and culture from an historical perspective. It will examine the central issues in Australian life today and trace their antecedents. Australia is a western, liberal democracy that shares profound cultural similarities with America and Great Britain. This course will help to illuminate what makes the Australian experience of life different to other such western, liberal democracies. In measuring these differences it will look at issues such as: Australian settler culture’s relationship with Aboriginal Australians; Australia’s experience of migration and multiculturalism; Australians’ relationship with their environment; and Australians’ sense of national identity. It will look to see how these issues have played out in popular culture, and students will be expected to use primary sources to gauge the attitudes of Australians. This course will not only provide students with an understanding of the specificities of the Australian experience, it will also help them to understand American culture better, through a comparative approach.

This course is a survey of the principal themes and issues in the development of Indigenous art in Australia. It focuses on some of the regional and historical variations of Aboriginal art in the context of the history of a settler nation, while considering the issues of its circulation and evaluation within contemporary discourses of value. Topics include the cosmological dimensions of the art, its political implications, its relationship to cultural identity, and its aesthetic frameworks. Students will visit some of the major national collections of Indigenous Australian art as well as exhibitions of contemporary works. There will also be guest presentations from Indigenous artists and Indigenous art curators.

Sample Syllabus


Biology

London

Prerequisite: High School Chemistry
Students registering for this course must also register for Lecture & Recitation.

Introductory course mainly for science majors designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics, and history and classification of life forms and evolution.

Sample Syllabus


Business

Florence

An introduction to the area of financial accounting. Encompasses accounting concepts from the point of view of the corporate investor and business management. Accounting procedures are discussed to facilitate the comprehension of the recording, summarizing, and reporting of business transactions. The basic principles of asset valuation and revenue and cost recognition are presented. Various asset, liability, and capital accounts are studied in detail with emphasis on an analytical and interpretive approach. The area of financial accounting is further analyzed through a discussion of the concepts and underlying financial statement analysis and the exposition of funds flow. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and as a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels from producer to consumer and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases and projects to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 or ECON-UA 18 or both STAT-UB 1 & STAT-UB 3

Designed to give students a better understanding of how firms can gain competitive advantage from their operations function. Typically this requires the firm to achieve, at a minimum, cost, quality and ecological parity; responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs and desires; rapid time to market; process technology leadership; and sufficient and responsive capacity. A problem-solving framework is developed that enables students to undertake managerial and technical analysis that should result in the desired competitive advantage. Both service and manufacturing case examples are utilized.

Sample Syllabus 

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from instructors and staff.

Sample Syllabus 

London

This course is only open to Stern BPE Students.

This course provides students with an overview of the theoretical traditions inspiring current research in international relations (IR). IR is a discipline which attempts to explain processes and events in world politics. Primarily emerging as a way to explain the behaviour of nation-states and their interactions, the discipline has expanded with the onset of globalization to explore an array of actors, institutions and processes which include but simultaneously transcend the nation-state.

The course will focus on the major theories of IR, and how theoretical debates inform key literature in major subfields of the discipline. The course is constructed in such a way as to familiarize students with core debates and cleavages in the field, for example between behavioural and ideological approaches to the study of world politics. There will also be a focus on some of the key substantive subfields of IR such as international organisations, humanitarian intervention, and global governance. Lastly, there will be ample opportunity for students to model international political behaviour through the application of rational choice and game theory. Students will be encouraged to use this as an opportunity to explore the efficacy of such approaches and their alternatives, to explaining the behaviour and actions of different actors in world politics.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (6 credits) OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (4 credit) plus ECON-UA 19/STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Foundations of Finance (FINC-UB 2) and Statistics or equivalents.

The class focuses on the nature of financial management from a number of perspectives including the national, the corporate and the individual, but particularly the corporate. You will become familiar with the financial system, including that relating to banking, though there will be little overlap with courses that deal with the functioning of financial markets. The importance of behavioural finance will also be stressed during the course. 

Sample Syllabus

Investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. Develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems. Introduces the student to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis, and class discussion.

Sample Syllabus

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and as a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels from producer to consumer and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases and projects to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Analysis (also accepted: ECON-UA 18, ECON-UA 20, or BOTH STAT-UB 1 and STAT-UB 3)

Designed to give students a better understanding of how firms can gain competitive advantage from their operations function. Typically this requires the firm to achieve, at a minimum, cost, quality and ecological parity; responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs and desires; rapid time to market; process technology leadership; and sufficient and responsive capacity. A problem-solving framework is developed that enables students to undertake managerial and technical analysis that should result in the desired competitive advantage. Both service and manufacturing case examples are utilized.

Sample Syllabus

Every professional business person must be aware of how legal systems work and effect business decisions. Furthermore, the interaction between Law and Business is multidimensional involving international, ethical, and technological considerations. In this course, students examine how key areas of business law, including contracts, torts, and business organizations, influence the structure of domestic and international business relationships. Students actively participate in legal studies designed to enhance business skills such as analytical thinking, written communication, oral presentation, conflict resolution, and team work problem-solving. 

Sample Syllabus Coming Soon

This course provides the theoretical fundamentals in communication, applies communication strategy to oral and written business assignments, and focuses on how organizations communicate to their varied internal and external stakeholders.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ECON-UB11: Economics of Global Business or ECON-UA 238: International Economics and FINC-UB2: Foundations of Finance or ECON-AD 302:Foundations of Financial Markets

This course description is based on the Stern course offered on Washington Square Campus

Recent global financial turbulence has demonstrated both how important the financial
system is to the world economy and how complex it is.

Financial systems are centered on key institutions, instruments and markets. But they
also involve governments, public policy and regulation. They span the globe from the
US, the EU and Japan to Russia, China and the Emerging Markets. In critical ways,
country-level financial architectures are integrating to form a more seamless, high-performance whole. This is good for efficiency, innovation and growth, yet it also
amplifies problems during times of crisis

This course provides students with a broad and rigorous understanding of (i) How the
global financial system works and what purposes it serves, (ii) What the major elements
are and how they operate, and (iii) What challenges the global financial system creates
for public policy makers. In seeking to achieve these objectives, this broad-gauge
course provides a perspective that helps students understand and make the most of
their own professional opportunities. Along with a working knowledge of the global
macroeconomy, foundations of finance and corporate finance, this course will be
extremely helpful for students as a lens to focus on the key dimensions of the modern
business environment.

Sample Syllabus Coming Soon.

 

Madrid

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and as a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels from producer to consumer and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases and projects to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas.

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (6 credits) OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (4 credit) plus ECON-UA 19/STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Prague

Provides the background necessary to make decisions about computer-based information systems and to be an “end-user”. Two major parts of the course are hands-on experience with personal computers and information systems management. Group and individual computer assignments expose students to electronic spreadsheet analysis and database management on a personal computer. Management aspects focus on understanding computer technology, systems analysis and design, and control of information processing by managers. 

This course is being offered at NYU Prague for the first time in Fall 2014. The Syllabus should closely resemble the following sample from NYU in New York:

Sample Syllabus from New York

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and as a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels from producer to consumer and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases and projects to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas.

Syllabus

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from instructors and staff.

Sample Syllabus

Shanghai

This course focuses on China’s political and economic development over the last century and a half with particular attention to the last 33 years, the so-called Reform Period. Our three primary objectives are to (1) understand the historical trajectory of China’s development path; (2) consider in what ways and to what degree the growth experiences of East Asia’s high-performing economies helped inform China’s economic policymakers decisions and shed light on the prospects for the long-term success of reforms in China; (3) assess the state of China’s contemporary political economy and the current role of the government in generating or inhibiting economic activity.

This course investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. The course develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems, and introduces students to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis and class discussion.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the field of marketing by introducing and developing central concepts and philosophies of marketing, and exploring the relationship of marketing with other business disciplines. Keeping in mind the perspectives of both producer and consumer, the course examines the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. The course concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Ethical issues in marketing are also addressed. In addition to lecture, the course uses case studies and student projects as methods for student learning.

Sample Syllabus

Every professional business person must be aware of how legal systems work and effect business decisions. Furthermore, the interaction between Law and Business is multidimensional involving international, ethical, and technological considerations. In this course, students examine how key areas of business law, including contracts, torts, and business organizations, influence the structure of domestic and international business relationships. Students actively participate in legal studies designed to enhance business skills such as analytical thinking, written communication, oral presentation, conflict resolution, and team work problem-solving.

Sample Syllabus

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from the instructor.

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (6 credits) OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (4 credit) plus ECON-UA 19/STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces you to the concepts and skills you need to create and critique effective marketing. Business people in all areas need a solid understanding of marketing to succeed. What is marketing? Simply put - Effective marketing satisfies consumer needs and creates consumer value while allowing the firm to achieve its objectives.

Marketing covers several kinds of activities, each of which affects the others. Firms must resist the temptation to focus on one of these at the expense of the others. This creates ineffective, unbalanced marketing. Furthermore, firms need to create a balanced, coordinated marketing mix, where all elements of its marketing activities work together. Marketing also requires combining qualitative and quantitative analysis. This course will give you experience in coordinating the marketing mix and combining quantitative and qualitative analysis. The course uses a combination of lectures, class discussion, case studies, assignments and exams.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

An introduction to the area of financial accounting. Encompasses accounting concepts from the point of view of the corporate investor and business management. Accounting procedures are discussed to facilitate the comprehension of the recording, summarizing, and reporting of business transactions. The basic principles of asset valuation and revenue and cost recognition are presented. Various asset, liability, and capital accounts are studied in detail with emphasis on an analytical and interpretive approach. The area of financial accounting is further analyzed through a discussion of the concepts and underlying financial statement analysis and the exposition of funds flow.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: FINC-UB 2 or FINC-UB 9002 (Foundations of Finance)

This course helps students develop an analytical framework for understand-ing how organizations make investments and financial decisions. Students also learn the theory and practice of various valuation techniques. There is an emphasis on understanding the theory and its applications to the real world as well as appreciating the limitations of the tools in practical settings. Specific topics include capital budgeting,investment decision rules, discounted cash flow valuation, real options, cost
of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, and valuation methods.

Sample Syllabus coming soon

Only NYU Stern BPE students may register for this course under the BPEP-UB 9044 number. All other students should register under POL-UA 9530. For Non-BPE Stern this course does not count for Stern credit, though Stern students are welcome to take this course as an elective.

This class introduces students to the evolution of politics and economic policy in Latin America after WWII, with a focus on the post-debt crisis period. Students will become familiar with key political and economic concepts and theories regarding the evolution of policies in Latin America. During the first half of the class, we will explore key themes in post-debt crisis Latin America, focusing on the theme of “the rise and frustration of the Latin American middle class.” In the second part of the class, we will utilize those tools and explore these and additional themes through specific country cases).
Students will choose one main country to follow throughout the class, and will prepare a final paper assessing that country’s main political and economic challenges. Students will become familiar with major economic data sets, which they will use in their research, and will learn the basics of economic writing.

Syllabus


CAS Non-Departmental Courses

Berlin

Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

Course is currently under development.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 12 -15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by Cultural Vistas, an organization partnering with NYU. Cultural Vistas provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Arts and Museums
Public Policy & Government
Communication and Public Relations
Education
Non-Profits & Civic Engagement
Environment & Sustainability
STEM

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Interested Fall 2014 NYU Berlin students should complete the online application by Friday, April 11th. Please note, students must have language proficiency of at least Intermediate II German to be eligible for this internship program. For more information on the application process and deadlines, please visit the NYU Berlin Internship website.

 

London

Note: Students accepted to this course must indicate on their visa inquiry form that they want a Tier-4 General Student Visa; you will not be permitted to intern (paid or unpaid) in the UK without a Tier-4 visa.A Tier-4 visa costs a minimum of £310 GBP (approximately $527 USD), plus any applicable shipping and expedite fees.

Enrollment by permission only.  Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 16 hours fieldwork per week.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU. EUSA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus


Madrid

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and a minimum of 16 hours of fieldwork per week (two full days). Internship placements are made by EUSA, an internship placement organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Paris

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and two full days and one half day (Monday-Friday) for their internship.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Sydney

Course is currently under development.  Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by CAPA International (CAPA), an organization partnering with NYU. CAPA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Advertising
Business
Broadcasting
Education
Engineering
Film
Healthcare
Hospitality
Journalism
Politics and International Relations
Public Relations
Social Sciences

The internship course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Washington, D.C.

Can be counted for SCA-UA Internship credit (government and non-profit placements only).  Can also be counted for Politics major credit (internship with domestic policy focus only)

The seminar is designed to complement the internship fieldwork experience. In it we explore many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

 Students who secure an internship through or with the assistance of NYU Washington, DC must confirm their spot in the program and enroll in the internship class in order to accept the internship. Students are required to pursue 20 hours/ week in their internships to earn course credit. NYU Washington, DC advises that students pursue ~20 hrs/ week in internship committments. If students elect to participate in an internship that exceeds the recommended number of hours, they may be advised to reduce their academic courseload. Students are highly encouraged to consult NYU Washington DC staff for assistance with these decisions.

PLEASE NOTE: Internships that take place in Maryland, regardless of whether credit is awarded for the experience, require that your school or department have a certificate of approval to operate in the state.  If you are interested in a placement in Maryland, please contact global.internships@nyu.ed before applying to the internship for more information.

Syllabus


Chemistry

London

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 102 College Chemistry II or its equivalent.

Students registering for this course must register for lecture, laboratory, and recitation.

An introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds, the course is presented in the functional group framework incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, and spectroscopy (IR, NMR, UV/visible, and mass spectroscopy). 

Laboratory provides training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, including crystallization, distillation, extraction, and other separation techniques such as column chromatography and gas chromatography. Experiments involving the synthesis of organic compounds are introduced as well as those performing qualitative organic analysis.

Sample Lecture Syllabus

Sample Lab Syllabus


Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies

Sydney

This course is currently under development. 

Prerequisite: PSYCH-UA 1/Intro to Psychology

While psychopathology courses are commonplace among undergraduate psychology curricula, courses focusing on child and adolescent psychopathology are relatively rare. More novel still is the opportunity to receive instruction in child and adolescent psycho pathology from practicing psychiatrists and psychologists at an internationally renowned clinical and research center. Through lecture presentations and discussions, this course will focus on disease etiology, epidemiology, phenomenology, nosology, and diagnosis. We will engage students in a critical review of common child and adolescent psychopathology and challenge social and cultural assumptions of what constitutes “normal” vs. “pathological” behavior, cognition, and emotion.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Cinema Studies

Buenos Aires

A survey of anticolonialist cinema with special emphasis on Latin America. Despite conditions of economic and political oppression, Latin America has managed in recent years to forge a dynamically original cinema. After studying some European films that highlight the colonial background of current struggles in the world, we take a brief look at African cinema and then look closely at Latin American cinema, with films from Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Cuba. The emphasis throughout is on a common theme – the struggle against foreign domination and on the search for an authentic, innovative national cinematic style.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Co-requisite: Enrollment in a screening time.

This course covers Italian film from the beginnings of the neo-realist movement to 1960, concentrating both on the aesthetic, theoretical development of neorealism and on its political, economic, social, and cultural context. Directors studied in detail include Rossellini, Visconti, de Sica, and Antonioni. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

London

Students registering for this class must also register for the Screenings section.

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

This course provides an exciting and challenging introduction to British Cinema, studying the rich and varied relationships between the society and its films. It is organised in four main parts, offering an Introduction to Film Studies; a look at National Identity and the Cinema in relation to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the UK as a whole; case studies in key authors Mike Leigh and Ken Loach; and approaches to narrative and genre.

Sample Syllabus

Classics

Florence

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

This course provides students with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilization of ancient Italy from 1000 B.C. to 200 A.D. The lectures will examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning and the minor arts of the period. The course will include local field trips to important sites and exhibits. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 


College Core Curriculum

Buenos Aires

Please be aware that NYU CAS students will be given registration priority for this course.  CAS students will be able to register at their regularuly assigned appointment time. Non-NYU CAS students will be able to register on Friday of registration week.

Over the last 50 years, millions of Latin Americans have experienced extraordinary shifts in their social, political, and cultural landscape, a result of the transformative effects of revolution or insurgency, state repression, popular resistance and social movements. We focus on events that had continental, hemispheric, and even global impact, including the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the military coups of the 1970s, and the Zapatista uprising in 1994. Drawing on a range of primary sources and cultural forms, we listen carefully to the voices of the major social actors of the time. Our sources are drawn from a wide range of media: newsprint, television broadcasts, transcripts, testimony, essay, documentary and feature film, art, and music. We deliberately mix artistic representations with documentary evidence to understand how the arts—music, visual art, literature, film—do not just reflect the reality around them, but are themselves vital sites for shaping and changing that reality and our imagination of it, both then and now.

Florence

Although the Italian peninsula has been the site of some of the oldest and most significant
civilizations in Western history, the modern Italian state is relatively young, having been
established only in 1861. Italy’s geographical and cultural complexities have ensured that
regional identities throughout the country remain strong, to the extent that many Italians
still identify closely with their more immediate social, cultural, and political traditions.
Furthermore, Italy is positioned as a gateway of the Mediterranean world, making it both
the center (if one views it from the shores of North Africa) and the periphery (if one views
it from the countries bordering the North Sea) of Europe. This course will focus on the
tensions and ambiguities present in post‐unification Italian society, using the rich cultural
and social heritage of Florence as a starting point for the study of the delicate mixture of
regional and national elements that make up contemporary Italy.

Sample Syllabus

London

This class introduces students to an in-depth academic study of changing views of British national identity and culture, using a variety of primary and secondary sources. Britain is a multi-national state, a union of 4 nations, each with their own distinctive cultures and heritages. Three of the nations, Wales, Scotland and Ireland have been brought under the English monarchy and political system, and, in the case of the first two, they have been long-term partners in the benefits accruing to the largest empire the world has seen and the first, and for a long time, the most successful industrial nation. The height of that unity was probably in the period of the Second World War and its aftermath. Since then, with the collapse of the British Empire, Britain’s membership of the European Union, devolution of power to Scotland and Wales, the union has come under increasing pressure from centrifugal forces. The course examines the image that Britain presents to the world, the myths on which the national identity of the component nations were formed and the institutions that might be considered to hold the union together today. This involves looking at the self-image of Britain in relation to empire, foreign policy, immigration and multiculturalism, monarchy, parliament , sport and media representations. British national identity is revealed as an increasingly contested concept in a globalised world.

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

Taking advantage of its location in Madrid, this course analyzes the ways inwhich historical, geopolitical, cultural, artistic, and popular viewsfunction to constitute and continuously transform a national culture.Specifically, the course concentrates on epistemological constructionsof Spain—the idea of Spain—that emerges from competing external andinternal perspectives. Students will examine how this national cultureis constructed in three modules. The first analyzes Spain from NorthAfrican perspectives as, on the one hand, the traditional site and mythof a lost paradise in Sephardic nostalgic poetry as well asHispano-Arabic literary traditions and, on the other, as the place towhich some contemporary, radical movements view as a strategic goal.The second module looks at American perspectives in which the idea ofSpain pits notions of Spanish imperial power and grandeur against theBlack Legend, a term that protestant circles in Europe and the UnitedStates promoted to attack the legitimacy of Spain’s New World empire.The third perspective focuses on European views and analyzes thedepiction of Spain as the embodiment of German and French Romanticideals beginning at the end of the 17th century and the reemergence ofthe same notion during the Spanish Civil War (1933-36). Throughout thecourse, students will have the opportunity to examine some of the principal textual and visual images that contribute to the historicaland contemporary construction of a national culture that emerged atgeographic and cultural crossroads.

Sample Syllabus

 

Paris

France and the U.S. have a habit of looking at one another as anti-models when it comes to discussions of assimilation and difference, “race,” identity, community and diversity. In this course, we explore this comparison as a productive means for re-considering these terms. Why is the notion of “ethnic community” so problematic in France? And why do Americans insist on the “homogeneity” of the French nation, even as, at various points throughout modern French history, France has received more immigrants to its shores than the United States? Through readings, film screenings, and site visits we explore the movements and encounters that have made Paris a rich, and sometimes controversial, site of cultural exchange. Topics include contemporary polemics on questions such as headscarves, the banlieue, the new Paris museums of immigration and “primitive” art, affirmative action and discrimination positive, historic expressions of exoticism, négritude, and anti-colonialism. Occasional case studies drawn from the American context help provide a comparative framework for these ideas. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Prague

Russia’s rich and multifaced cultural identity has been shaped in a thousand year long process of interaction with a range of diverse cultural formations of the ‘West’ and ‘East’ (including Byzantine/ Christian ‘East’, Central Asian/Muslim ‘East’, South Asian/Indian ‘East”, and East Asian/Confucian ‘East’). For the last 300 years, since the era of Peter the Great, Russia’s greatest statesmen, philosphers, religious thinkers, writers, poets and creative artists were obssesed with the question of Russia’s distinctive cultural identity. This passionate search for the ‘Russian soul’ is apparently far from over, as the recent rise of interest in the ideas of ‘Eurasianism’ and ‘Neo-Slavophilism’ testifies. This course in Russian intellectual history explores the sources of Russia’s unique cultural blend through examination of some of the principal textual and artistic images representative of traditions that emerged at the geographic and cultural crossroads of Eastern Europe, including those which constitute Russia’s unique contribution to world culture. Students are encouraged to think critically and with a historically informed sensibility about the diverse perceptions of reality in cultures different from their own, especially about such fundamental categories as national identity, religion, morality, community, individual, gender, and the ‘other’.

Syllabus

Prague is without doubts one of the most important historical, geopolitical and cultural capitals of Central Europe. The concept of Central Europe is somewhat elusive and it is difficult to define it by geographical or political categories. Often, it is characterized simply as a space on the edge between the West and East. However, most scholars agree that there is a distinct Central European culture. Identified as having been one of the world’s richest sources of creative talent and thought between the 17th and 20th centuries, Central Europe was represented by many distinguished figures such as Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Kant, Goethe and Hegel; later followed by Kafka, Rilke, Freud, Mendel and Dvorak, to mention at least some. Central European culture is based on historical, social and cultural characteristics shared by the countries of this geopolitical entity. It is a result of complicated historical, political, ethnic, cultural, artistic and religious interactions throughout more then thousand years of its history. We explore characteristics of Central Europe primarily from the perspective of Prague and its cultural history, which is so typical and almost archetypal for this region. Students study geopolitical characteristics and various phenomena that co-create the idea of Central Europe. Taking advantage of course location in Prague, students have the opportunity to examine the primary sources and artifacts (literature, music, art, film) in their contexts and environment.

Syllabus

Sydney

How has Australian cinema engaged with significant and often contested historical, political and cultural events in the nation’s past? The films in this course offer critical perspectives on the history of colonisation in Australia; the legacies of the Stolen Generations; the controversies surrounding Australia’s role in World War One and the Vietnam War; as well as Australia’s relationships with its Pacific Asian neighbours. We will focus on films that have marked significant shifts in public consciousness about the past such as Gallipoli (1981), Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002) and Balibo (2009). We will also draw on films that have employed innovative narrative and aesthetic strategies for exploring the relationship between the past and the present such as Two Laws (1982) and The Tracker (2002). Throughout the course, students will develop their understanding of the basic methods and concepts of cinema studies. In particular, students will develop a critical vocabulary for analysing how filmmakers have approached the use of memory, testimony, re-enactment, researched detail, allegory and archives across a diverse range of examples. This includes restorations, revivals and re-imaginings of Australian cinema history such as the controversial restoration of Wake in Fright (1971) as an Australian classic; the reconstruction of Australia’s first feature film, The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906); and the revived interest in Ozploitation after the release of Not Quite Hollywood (2008).

Sample Syllabus


Comparative Literature

Accra

This course shall focus on the place of women in the literary tradition, an issue that is very current in the discourse on the literature of Africa and its Diaspora. Women writers have emerged at the forefront of the movement to restore African women to their proper place in the study of African history, society and culture. In this process, the need to recognize the women as literary artists in the oral mode has also been highlighted. Furthermore, the work of women writers is gaining increasing significance and deserves to be examined within the context of canon formation. Authors and texts will be examined, focusing on such topics as the heritage of women's literature, images of women in the works of male writers; women in traditional and contemporary society; women and the African family in the literary tradition; literature as a tool for self-definition and self-liberation; African women writers; female expressions of cultural nationalism in the Caribbean; female novelists of the African continent; Black women dramatists; the poetry of African women.

Sample Syllabus

Note: this course is open to all students for elective credit. Comparative
literature majors in track ii (literary and cultural studies) may count this
course toward one of their non-core major requirements.

The course examines certain recurring themes and critical issues in post-colonial narratives in Africa. It begins with a look at the debate and polemics around post-colonialism as a critical and theoretical concept. It then dwells on specific narratives, mainly novels by African writers, works located in the period following classical colonialism. The reading of these narratives is informed by such critical issues as the crisis of cultures in contact; personal, class, ethnic and national identities; the politics of gender; debates over language; the aesthetics and politics of art; strategic transformations in narrative form, etc.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course may be counted towards the Cultural Specialization and Elective requirement for Comp Lit majors, with prior DUS approval.

This course focuses on literary representations of WWI and WWII. The online course pack includes examples of the political and military rhetoric to which Montale and Hemingway objected, historical essays and images (war photographs, recruitment posters, etc.), as well as the shorter texts we are studying. Central themes in the course are the concepts of political literature and historical fiction and the contrasting approaches and theoretical premises of classical realism and modernism. Among the supplementary sources available in the Villa Ulivi library are two good cultural histories on the subject: James Shehan Where Have All the Soldiers Gone and Mark Mazower Dark Continent. Other recurring issues will be gender, sexuality, religion, class politics, kitsch, psychoanalysis, rhetoric, and power.  

Sample Syllabus

Prague

"A book must be an ax for the frozen sea in us," wrote Franz Kafka (1883-1924), one of the best known but least understood authors of our times. In this course, we will break some of the clichés which are stuck to Kafka's life and work and dive into the fascinating, intricate and profoundly humorous world of his thoughts and emotions. In Prague, the city that determined and held Kafka in its "claws", we will trace the possible sources of the writer's private obsessions which became the general characteristics of modern men: The sense of isolation, the anxiety, the self-irony, the sense of responsibility and guilt, the quest for freedom, the struggle of an individual against the system. We will read selected works of Kafka, but also Meyrink - the author of Prague ghetto - and Milan Kundera. This course aims to bring the students to a point from which they can find their own genuine and intimate understanding of Kafka's writing.

Syllabus


Creative Writing

Accra

This is a workshop type course intended for a small group of students, each with a strong aptitude and/or demonstrated talent for creative writing. Our basic objective is to guide students into a more systematic approach to creative writing in any of the main genres, especially fiction and poetry. Each student is expected to engage in critical discussions on samples of their own writing as well as on writing by other members of the class. Our focus shall be on developing a grasp of the rudiments and general mechanics of the writer's craft, while at the same time allowing for a fuller realization of the personal/individual creative impulse and talent. Some class sessions will be devoted to various types of writing exercises, others to the discussion of sample texts, most of it produced by members of the class. Each student will be expected to share his/her work with the class and possibly with a wider audience when possible. At the end of the semester, each student will be expected to have produced a substantial body of creative writing for assessment by the course instructors.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Sample Syllabus

London

Beginning workshop in creative writing designed to explore and refine the student's individual writing interests. This course may include fiction and/or poetry and creative non-fiction. 

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

In this class students are encouraged to consider the intersectional environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) that they interact with and within, and how their sensibilities differ living away from home to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing. We will engage with a diverse range of readings – featuring many Australian authors – and discuss technical elements and affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Weeks are devoted to crafting the short story, contemporary indigenous storytelling, creative nonfiction, and poetry. The class emphasizes the importance of embodied interaction with the city through a field trip using ‘The Disappearing’ – a downloadable app featuring over 100 site-specific poems spanning a ‘poetic map’ of Sydney, created by The Red Room Company. Students will think about the possibilities of marrying new technologies with writing as they navigate using poems as landmarks. Students shall workshop their drafts during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique.

Sample Syllabus

Drama

Berlin

This course examines German theater of the twentieth century, from Expressionism to contemporary postdramatic forms of writing and performance. The course will first offer an overview of German theater traditions before 1900 and will then engage in analyzing specific developments in German theater starting with Max Reinhardt and his work at the Deutsches Theater Berlin. Other case studies will focus on Brecht’s epic theater, theater during the Third Reich, postwar theater trends in East and West Germany, and current developments in reunified Germany. Not only will we closely read relevant plays and theory by the theater makers of the respective periods but we will also explore aesthetics and performance issues as they have changed over time. As the involved practice of dramaturgy in Germany has greatly influenced theatrical developments, we will investigate this major aspect of theatrical work in Germany as a contribution to world theater and study how the extensive debate of ideas is being concretely realized in the theater through the choices being made in a production. An integral part of the course will include visits to Berlin theaters, attending performances, which we will analyze in class, and engaging in discussion with contemporary theater makers in Berlin.



Dramatic Literature

London

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of  $500 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

This course, designed to introduce students to the range of 20th-century drama staged in the contemporary London theater scene, presents a wide variety of British, American, and multicultural works currently playing. Students analyze the history of the modern theatre in London. Emphasis is placed on comparative interpretation of texts and the dramatic performances of works.

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of $283 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors' companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet. 

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100 with permission of the director.

A survey of Spanish cinema from the early beginnings of the silent movie to the present day. Important figures, such as Luis Buñuel, Luis García Berlanga, Edgar Neville, Juan Antonio Bardem, Fernando Fernán Gómez, Carlos Saura, and others are studied, as well as the phenomenon of cinema as a reflection of the political, social, and cultural development of the country and its people. A selection of the most representative films is shown in class.

Sample Syllabus 

Paris

This course will examine contemporary and classical French theater from a new perspective. Far from scholarly chronological norms, we will use contemporary writings in order to better study their classical sources and inspirations. Theatre is an artistic discipline that is constantly in communication with its past. Theatre examines its roots in order to reorient and renew itself. Actors and directors reinvent the verses of Corneille, Moliere and Shakespeare so that they can better discover the writings of today. Dramaturgists reflect contemporary society, yet are always nourished by their predecessors so that they can either create a connection or break with them definitively. In this course we will examine great contemporary authors such as Jarry, Cocteau, Giraudoux, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, Koltes, Wajdi Mouawad, etc. As for the great classical figures, we will discuss such various authors as Sophocles, Corneille, Shakespeare and Racine. How did Jean-Paul Sartre use Corneille and Racine to give credence to his theatre? How was Cocteau or Giraudoux inspired by ancient theatre? What did Koltes take from classical tragedy in order to create his own dramas? This course will examine both theatrical writings as well as current productions in order to answer these questions. All the performances seen for the course as well as the works read will be discussed in oral presentations or written summaries. Conducted in French.

On December 28th, 1895, cinema was given its official characteristics by the Lumière brothers in Paris. If for over a century, the “Seventh Art” has been an essential element and a vehicle for French culture, the city of Paris has epitomized the evolution and contradictions of the French cinema industry. Focusing on the main tendencies in contemporary French cinema, we will ask the following questions: How do the French filmmakers depict the city of Lights, the City of Love, the City of Horror? How decisive a representation of Paris and its suburbs can be? Why do the images of Paris illustrate the history of French cinema? What do they show about French culture?

Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the notion of French culture through an analysis of French cinema. Placing films in their historical and cultural context, we consider how cinema provides a window on French society, while recognizing that they are cultural products specific to a particular historical moment. Social history, cultural archetypes and artistic creation will be some of the topics under consideration. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus


East Asian Studies

Shanghai

Note: On Albert course is posted under NYU Shanghai: Chinese Language

This course introduces students to Chinese language, history and culture. It is aimed at students with no prior knowledge of Chinese. The language component of the course runs for 14 weeks and focuses on the development of competence in verbal communication and communication structures which can be used in daily life in China. The ‘daily culture’ component includes weekly excursions that are closely tied to the language topics being studied. The history and broader cultural components of the course will start from Week 8 and involve a weekly lecture and/or film to provide students with a basic overview of important historical events, as well as more recent economic, social and environmental developments. This course does not cover Elementary Chinese I. It is designed for students who have already completed their language requirement for their major or who will complete their language requirement with another language. Students cannot take this class if they have already completed Elementary Chinese I or equivalent or more advanced course. This course is not intended for native Chinese speakers. Finally, completion of this course does not qualify students to take Elementary Chinese II.

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correct basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level-appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have Chinese-speaking background and who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily life situations. It aims to develop students' correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing. Students who pass this class can enroll in "Intermediate Chinese I for Advanced Beginners".

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have Chinese-speaking background and who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily life situations. It aims to develop students' correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing. Students who pass this class can enroll in "Advanced Chinese 1".

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guesses about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Sample Syllabus

In this course we will select a number of critical issues in modern Chinese history to examine the political, social and cultural transformations of modern China. Topics of lectures include Confucianism and its modern fate, popular movements, the Great Leap Forward Movement, the role of Shanghai in modern China, Tiananmen Movement and the prospect of Chinese political reforms. The course will be approached through lectures, site visits, class discussions, and research.

Sample Syllabus


Economics

Buenos Aires

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

There are two parts to this course. In the first part of the course we will study two of the main financial asset markets: bond markets and stock markets. We will study the concept and determination of interest rates; the risk structure and the term structure of interest rates; stock pricing and the efficient markets hypothesis; cross-border arbitrage. We will also analyze financial structure in Argentina and other Latin American banks.

In the second part of the course we will study the monetary and financial system. We will study how money is created, the tools of monetary policy, the commercial banking industry and its links to monetary policy and the Central Bank, and how monetary policy affects the economy in general. In this part we will also analyze how market failures (such as information asymmetries) and distortionary policies (such as financial repression) may hinder the contribution of financial markets and monetary policy to macroeconomic stability. The roles of state-owned banks in Latin American economies will also be discussed.

Sample Syllabus

 

Florence

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Pre-calculus or equivalent level of mathematical training

Introduction to the American economy, elements of supply and demand, and basic macroeconomic principles. Includes national income and employment, money, banking, inflation, business fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, the balance of payments, and comparative economic systems. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Pre-calculus or equivalent level of mathematical training

Focuses on individual economic decision makers—households, business firms, and government agencies—and how they are linked together. The emphasis is on decision making by households and firms and how these decisions shape our economic life. Explores the different environments in which businesses sell their products, hire workers, and raise funds to expand their operations; the economic effects of various government policies, such as minimum wage legislation, rent controls, antitrust laws, and more. Conducted in English.

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 1 Economic Principles or ECON-UA 5 Intro to Economic Analysis or equivalents

The financial crisis that hit the global economy since the summer of 2008 is without precedent in post-war economic history. Although its size and extent are exceptional. the crisis has many features in common with similar financial-stress driven recession episodes in the past. However, this time there’s something different, with the crisis being global akin to the events that triggered the Great Depression of the 1930s. This crisis spread quickly and rapidly moved from the US to European countries that show the weakest economic indicators (PIIGS: Portugal, Ireland and Italy, Greece and Spain). This course will focus on the long run causes, consequences and EU responses to the crisis, conditionally on the characteristics of the countries involved. We will focus on the long process of European Integration and discuss whether it may represent a possible solution to the recent crisis.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

We offer a perspective on the workings of the monetary and financial system within a country and at an international level. The role of money and the tools to conduct monetary policy will be analyzed in detail. The concept of the value of money now and in the future helps in understanding the role of interest rates and of risk; various way to store wealth will take us into the structure of financial markets where financial instruments are created and traded to meet diverse needs. Some basic concepts on the role played by commercial banks will introduce the function of the Central Bank and of monetary policy in the overall goal of ensuring financial stability to the system. Current issues, such as the role of the European Central Bank and the instability created by the subprime mortgage crisis, will be discussed.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Microeconomics & Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1 and ECON-UA 2) or equivalents.

Focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital.The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination; and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics, & International Economics (NYU ECON-UA 10, ECON-UA 12, & ECON-UA 238) or equivalents.  International Economics can be taken as co-requisite with special permission.

This course aims at offering a global perspective on development, long term change in the world economy, and the interaction between countries, regulatory systems and firms. Recent developments have changed completely the patterns of development and the relationships between developed and developing/emerging countries.
The focus of the course is on the shift of production to East Asia, on poverty and inequality, on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including changes in production patterns (outsourcing, offshoring, service offshoring), on the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances and protectionism, and on the impact of technological innovation on international competitiveness.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra and Calculus with a grade of C or higher or passing placement exam.

This course is only open to Economics Policy Majors and prospective majors.

This course introduces calculus for real valued functions of a single real variable and of several real variables. In particular, it shows how calculus can be used to solve optimization problems for these functions, including constrained optimization problems which can be solved by substitution. A substantial number of economic examples will be analyzed during the course.

 

 

 

London

Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Mathematics for Economics II (MATH-UA 212). Restriction only for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: not open to seniors.

Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211).

Not open to NYU Stern students.

Examines the manner in which producers, consumers, and resource owners acting through the market determine the prices and output of goods, the allocation of productive resources, and the functional distribution of incomes. The price system is seen as a network of interrelated decisions, with the market process serving to communicate information to decision makers.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10). Restriction only for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: not open to seniors.

Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1), Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211).  

Study of aggregate economic analysis with special attention paid to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation. Critically examines both the theories and the policies associated with them.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

The principal characteristics of the financial system and its current challenges; derivatives, financial innovation and the banking industry; money supply and monetary policy; bonds, equities and interest rates; financial supervision and regulation; pricing of financial securities and balanced portfolios; foreign exchange and how currency markets impact policy and asset choices; international policy co-ordination; banking crises and reform programmes.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: ECON-UA 9001, Economic Principles and ECON-UA 9002, Economic Principles II

This course focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department’s more advanced course in ECON-UA 324. The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Sample Syllabus (Please note that there are different sections of this course which use different text books. Please wait to hear from NYU London or your Professor about which book to buy. Do not base your purchase off of this sample syllabus)

Prague

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisite: Precalculus (NYU MATH-UA 9)

Focuses on the economy as a whole (the "macroeconomy"). Begins with the meaning and measurement of important macroeconomic data (on unemployment, inflation, and production), then turns to the behavior of the overall economy. Topics include long-run economic growth and the standard of living; the causes and consequences of economic booms and recessions; the banking system and the Federal Reserve; the stock and bond markets; international exchange rates and the impact of global economic events; and the role of government policy.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 10 or ECON-UA 11, Intermediate Microeconomics or Microeconomics (Theory).

The subject of the course is to describe one of the most profound changes to take place in the history of the world economy - the rapid change from centrally planned economies to market economies throughout what used to be known as "the Soviet block". Although some reforms in some countries began much earlier, the true transition began in most Central and Eastern European countries roughly in 1990. This means that scholars and researchers are only now beginning to have the data and a sufficient distance needed to study and analyze the transition process.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

The principal characteristics of the financial system and its current challenges; derivatives, financial innovation and the banking industry; money supply and monetary policy; bonds, equities and interest rates; financial supervision and regulation; pricing of financial securities and balanced portfolios; foreign exchange and how currency markets impact policy and asset choices; international policy co-ordination; banking crises and reform programs.


English

London

On Christmas Day, 1764 Horace Walpole published The Castle of Otranto, the very first Gothic novel. The Gothic flourished especially in the nineteenth century, creating a whole vocabulary of new creatures and landscapes and two of the great books of the genre: Frankenstein And Dracula. This course concentrates on the great works of Gothic which are central to an understanding of literature, film, early Romanticism and popular culture. Specialising on the works of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we will also explore how those texts were reinvented for film and what new elements were added in the twentieth century. Using a selection of texts and using a variety of approaches from the historical to the post modern and the feminist to queer theory we will explore the multifarious levels of meaning in Gothic texts as well as looking at narrative strategies and a variety of themes including the political and revolutionary, the erotic and the exotic, the Promethian and the undead, the role of religion, the role of women, the Wandering Jew and the 'mock' medieval.

Most of these major texts from the canon of English literature have been selected because they open out onto life in London at the time they were written. We shall be concerned not only with topics of place and setting, but also with issues of individual and national identity, as well as with forms of verse, drama, and fictional narratives. We shall be seeing a performance of Marlowe’s Dr Faustus at Shakespeare’s Globe, witnessing justice in action in a London court, as well as visiting the houses of Dr Johnson and Charles Dickens, Tate Britain, and viewing screen versions of a couple of our chosen novels. Texts will be studied in chronological order; the course is weighted towards literature of the last 100 years. The Oxford Book of English Verse will help give us a sense of continuity and change.

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of  $500 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

This course, designed to introduce students to the range of 20th-century drama staged in the contemporary London theater scene, presents a wide variety of British, American, and multicultural works currently playing. Students analyze the history of the modern theatre in London. Emphasis is placed on comparative interpretation of texts and the dramatic performances of works.

Sample Syllabus

This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film). We will also examine the texts in relation to issues such as gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals.

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of $283 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors' companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet. 

Sample Syllabus

This course will examine the major British novels of the 19th Century in the context of their setting in London and British culture. The course will include visits to London sites presented in the works that will be read. Readings include such major novelists as Dickens, Thackeray, Wilde, Woolf, and others. 

Sydney

This course is an introduction to the literatures of Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific region, with a focus on indigenous, migrant and diasporic writing. In addition to major texts from Australia and New Zealand, we will also encounter a range of works from Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, and the Pacific islands. Some questions we will tackle include: How have the cultural, historical, and economic processes of colonialism, diaspora and migration connected and shaped this diverse region? How have issues of race and indigeneity been central to various discourses of nationalism? What particular roles have Australia and New Zealand, as sub-imperial powers, played in the region? Finally, what can the latest generation of migrant writing in Australia show us about new forms of interconnections across the globalizing Asia-Pacific? Students in this course will examine novels, poetry, films and theoretical texts to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills. Along the way, they will gain a solid grounding in the problematics of postcolonialism, race, diaspora, indigeneity, nationalism and multiculturalism.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

Berlin

Comprehensive examination of Berlin’s urban ecology and urban planning
approaches, introducing their history, and the correlations between the city’s built
structure, urban nature and culture. Combination of lectures, workshops and site visits
to several facets of Berlin’s ‘green’ past and present.
Investigation of Berlin’s ‘green’ structures in relation to the economic, socio-cultural,
and political processes that shape it with an emphasis on sustainable ideas and
projects and how they influence Berlin’s built structure.
Reading-intensive course that meets for 3,5 hours per week.

Sample Syllabus

Shanghai

This course explores the environmental situation in China by examining both the very serious environmental challenges that China faces and the governance system(s) that exist in China for dealing with those challenges. In order to assess these challenges and systems, the course introduces a comparative dimension – looking at not only the Chinese system, but the American system as well, examining the environmental challenges and governance system of the United States, as well as the broader context within which China and the U.S. together constitute the two primary sources of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Is it possible to compare the American and Chinese systems? Can concepts of governance and assessment be translated between the two systems? What can China learn from the U.S.? What can America learn from China? Will the profound differences in our political and economic systems make environmental cooperation impossible, leading inevitably to conflict? Will globalization and technological innovation lead to healthy competition and cooperation to address common problems?

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

In this hybrid reading / writing class, we will explore environmental journalism from an Australian perspective. Each week we will read and discuss work that explores this journalistic tradition, its forms and its themes and the place it takes in the new media world. Drawing our inspiration from great writers, we will find our own stories, our own voices and learn to tell our own tales. We will grapple with the debates around environmental advocacy, ethics and objectivity and develop techniques to help us wade through the quicksand of scientific proof and funding agendas. Big local issues in the environmental conversation in Australia include water scarcity and the battle over inland rivers, damage caused by intensive agriculture such as spreading dryland salinity, land clearing, the felling of old-growth forests, combating exotic animals and plants, preserving the Wild, marine conservation and the Reef, protecting our primarily coastal homes from rising sea-levels, our economic reliance on uranium, coal and other mining, urban encroachment into agricultural land and the tension between indigenous rights and environmental aims. As a big coal and uranium miner, Australia also plays an important part in global debates around nuclear issues and ocean and air quality.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

This will be a hands-on course examining the role of journalism in society and Washington, DC in particular, examining how people here manipulate facts to fit a world view. It is about truth and truthiness and how to tell the difference. It will be part overview and lecture on topics central to the course and part active reporting and writing. To take advantage of the unique Washington location and distinct attitude in the city, students will participate in press conferences and go to public hearings on Capitol Hill in reporting roles and then write news-style articles. The class will include a focus on the 2014 midterm elections. Invited guest speakers are from NASA, NOAA, environmental activist groups, energy lobbyists and Washington media. The intersection of the media with science, politics and economics on the issue of global warming will be a focal point of this course.

Sample Syllabus

 

This survey course will focus on the historical development of U.S. federal authority and capacity over public lands and resources, including the germination and expansion of the idea of a coherent public interest with respect to air, water, forests, landscapes, and other environmental attributes. The course will address U.S. environmental policy through several lenses, including (1) a set of two introductory sessions in which students are introduced to key terminology, concepts, and orientations toward the domain of environmental policy; (2) a core series of fourteen sessions through which we survey how historical precedents have shaped contemporary U.S. environmental policies and programs; and (3) a concluding set of three sessions through which we review several unfolding environmental policy topics (e.g., climate change, invasive species, or hydraulic fracturing).

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. We will explore what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. We will consider how to measure sustainability and discuss the effectiveness of sustainability indicators. We will examine governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. We will also highlight the transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future.

Syllabus


European and Mediterranean Studies

Berlin

This course aims to provide an overview of the history, structure, functions, processes
and current issues of European integration with a particular emphasis on the role of
Germany both as to its influence on the EU and the Europeanisation of its own political
system.
European Integration is understood in this course to mean the co-operation, which EU
Member states organize in the framework of the Union, and the direction in which this
co-operation evolves. For these twenty-eight diverse countries, integration constitutes
an increasingly essential component and extension of their own state structure. It
permits them to conceive of, to decide on, and to carry out a growing number of
important state tasks in common, and under the roof of the European Union.
You will consider the milestones of postwar European integration. You will analyze the
institutions, procedures and instruments of European integration as well as major EU
policies and the distribution of competencies between Member States and Union. And
you will get acquainted with theoretical models to explain the nature of European
integration up to the present.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

The course examines significant moments in the development of Europe’s and America’s notions
and images of one another from the 18th century to the present. The in-depth discussion
will be based upon historical documents and cultural texts with equal attention to sources
from America/the US and Europe/Germany in an effort to explore and evaluate the major
theoretical and rhetorical paradigms (and the shifts therein) informing the perceptions as well
as cultural constructions of the “other” past and present. Moreover, the course will investigate
and evaluate recent manifestations of Anti-Americanism and analyse the ideo-logical and
cultural coordinates of current anti-American concepts in Europe/Germany as well as concepts
of Europe as a socio-cultural model for the 21st century. In conclusion, the politics of the
current US-Administration will be discussed in terms of their impact on transatlantic relations
as well as on dealing with global challenges, particularly in the Middle East.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus coming soon

Paris

The purpose of this seminar on European integration is to give the students a few keys in understanding what the European Union is and how it works; how it affects every day policies of the member states as well as the life of European citizens; what kind of world actor the EU is or might become; what political consequences the current financial crisis might have for the EU. Conducted in French.

This course investigates the history, the structure and the inner logic and working of European integration from the end of the Second World War to present day. It will provide students with an overview of the political institutions, the member states and the current developments of the European Union while focusing on the paramount role played by France throughout the years. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

This course will try to put European security into the context of today’s world: from the collapse of communism and dissolution of the Warsaw Pact through the years of wars in the former Yugoslavia, the wars on former Soviet territory, and to the stateless threat of terrorism today. But study limited to Europe would be pointless; the Old Continent is no longer the prime player on the planet. Therefore a series of related topics and areas will also be discussed: U.S. military might (especially compared to the European armed forces); the situation in adjacent regions (North Africa, Middle East, Russia and Ukraine) and its implication for Europe; and the new types of terrorism. 

Syllabus

The overriding goal of this course is to reach an understanding of the key strategic issues facing Europe in today’s global context. We will track how Europe has reached the present critical juncture in its history and consider where it is headed, including the options available to European policy-makers amid the on-going crisis in the EU. To this end, we will examine the key events of the 19th and 20th centuries that led to the foundation of the EU and have shaped contemporary Europe. At the same time, we will consider Europe’s relations with the US as today’s sole superpower, the challenges posed by the resurgence of China and Russia and Europe’s role as a major player in the resource-rich Eurasian continent, where a new round of great power competition is unfolding.
The course is interdisciplinary: it draws on political economy, history, international relations and geopolitics. It aims to raise questions and stimulate discussion rather than provide clear-cut answers.

Syllabus

Totalitarian ideologies which were used in European political discourse in the twentieth century to explain major historical changes have changed forever the relationship between the state and its citizens. The aspiration of the totalitarian state to acquire total control over individual lives through control of education, employment and health systems succeeded beyond anything perceived possible until then in any political regime after European Enlightenment. Nazism and Communism mobilized irrationally motivated mass support and won power in a very short time. Their success was partially based on a mass propaganda, using fear as primary instinctive argument against a picture of both external and internal enemies. The major focus of the course will be oriented towards topics trying to explain the reasons for mass support for totalitarian ideologies and states on the basis of individual psychology. We will examine psychological explanations of a selfvictimisation, role of a victim and a perpetrator, majority society response to mass human rights abuses and the abusive past. On this background a phenomenon of a political and cultural dissent will be introduced and discussed. The role of electronic mass media, antiglobalisation movements and global terrorism are discussed as possible modern vehicles of totalitarian tendencies and reactions against them.

Syllabus

This course will concentrate on the analysis of the pursuits of democracy in Western Europe. Firstly, the conception of Europe will be explored in its historical perspective and different perceptions: territorial, political, spiritual, cultural etc. Secondly, the characterizing social cleavages of Europe will be introduced: territorial, economic, religious, national, ethnic etc. Furthermore, we will discuss how these cleavages get expressed in the formation of different social interests and lead to the organization of interests groups, political parties and NGOs. Thirdly, turning towards the institutional structures of West European parliamentary democracies, we will address the existence of political party systems, as well as the executive and legislative powers represented by government and parliament. Fourthly, we will explore the rules and outcomes of different electoral systems, which ensure regular rotation of political elites at power – however, under different principles. Finally, we will assess the enrichment of the classical models of government in Western Europe, which have in the last 20 years been supplemented by additional players participating in the decision making processes on different levels (local, regional, national and European) – leading to new political conceptualization of ‘governance’. Also, while European states remain core units of European integration, they are also influenced by the EU, leading to their Europeanization. The new challenges facing Western Europe, such as globalization, continuing European integration, regionalization, restructuring of social welfare systems and the issues of identity, will be discussed. 

Syllabus


Film and Television

Prague

Emphasizing one of the most influential film movements in the post-World War II era, the cinema of the Czech New Wave. This cinema studies course explores the history and development of Czech and Slovak cinema. Lectures are supplemented with screenings.

Syllabus


French

Paris

Open to students in both Programs I & II

This workshop allows students the opportunity to sing their way to a discovery of French language and culture. Students expand their vocabulary and improve their pronunciation through performance while learning about the history and context of this popular art form. The workshop culminates in a performance at the end of the semester. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students in both Programs I & II

In this workshop students have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of phonetics and improve their pronunciation and comprehension of spoken French. Through listening exercises, poetry, and role-plays, students will work on articulation, rhythm and intonation. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students in both Program I & II

Students may work in a variety of realms such as drawing, painting, photography and/or folding. During the course the students will have the opportunity of creating alongside the professor in her art studio.
Students wishing to carry out a personal creative project are most welcome to develop it during the art classes. However, students choosing this must imperatively have proof prior to beginning art classes.
The course includes visits to museum to explore the wide range of subjects and materials available to contemporary artists, and concludes with the exhibition/ theatre performance in a prestigious Parisian venue at the end of the semester. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Presentation and systematic practice of basic structures and vocabulary of oral French through dialogues, pattern drills, and exercises. Correct pronunciation, sound placement, and intonation are stressed. For students with little or no command of French. Completes the equivalent of one year's elementary course. Textbook: Alors? Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 10 or FREN-UA 1-2. Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's elementary level and to others on assignment by placement test. Completes the equivalent of a year's intermediate level in one semester.

Acquisition and practice of more sophisticated structures of French. Development of fundamental oral and written skills, vocabulary enrichment, conversational ability. Short reading texts; guided compositions. Completes the equivalent of one year's intermediate course. Textbook: Alors? Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 11-12 or FREN-UA 20. Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's intermediate level and to others who have passed the proficiency examination but who wish to review their French in order to take advanced courses in language, literature, and civilization.

Systematizes and reinforces language skills presented in earlier level courses through an intensive review of grammar, written exercises; an introduction to composition, lexical enrichment, and spoken skills. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Please note that this course can be counted toward the Media, Culture, & Communication major. Should you choose to enroll in this course, please notify your MCC primary advisor. He or she will make sure this course is accurately reflected in your academic record.

Professor Barbara Shapiro Comte
This course explores the evolution of French art across 200 years of tumultuous upheavals in Paris, 1630-1830, from the Ancien Régime of Louis XIII to the Revolution, into the Napoleonic Empire up to the Bourbon Restoration. Through analysis of the reciprocity between artists and politico-cultural institutions of the capital, we discover how art of diverse media―painting, architecture, and popular prints, including political broadsheets and caricature―operated as a visual language of persuasion and propaganda, and/or as a critique of social and moral values. Our ultimate goal is to establish how French art of the past serves as a model to investigate the role of contemporary print and electronic media (including advertising) in its representation of power and its influence on our perceptions of the global world. Illustrated lectures are enhanced by seminars, museums visits, architectural walks, analysis of visual press clippings, and independent assignments based on examination of original artworks.

NYU Art History students: This course counts for Art History Elective credit.

This course aims to understand and appreciate the creativity and dynamism of the Parisian art scene today through an exploration of contemporary art in the capital. The course will focus on the diversity of resources provided by the city, with special attention to new artistic practices and loci of production, as well as the multiple actors involved, from artists themselves to private galleries to art critics and museum curators. Reference to major avant-garde art movements of the past such as dada, geometrical abstraction, surrealism and expressionism will also be made in order to better situate today’s artistic concerns. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

This course examines aspects of political and social change in France from the end of the French Revolution to the present day. Through an exploration of Paris neighborhoods, monuments and museums, we will look at how the city’s evolution has been inscribed on the urban landscape, and reflect on how history and national identity are imagined, produced and contested through the carving up of urban space. Major dates and events of French political history form the chronological backbone for this course, while class discussions are organized thematically from the perspective of social history and the history of ideas. Classes include walking tours and site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the notion of French culture through an analysis of French cinema. Placing films in their historical and cultural context, we consider how cinema provides a window on French society, while recognizing that they are cultural products specific to a particular historical moment. Social history, cultural archetypes and artistic creation will be some of the topics under consideration. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the crucial decade lasting from mid 1930s to the Liberation of France from German Occupation in 1944, while also going well beyond those chronological and geographical parameters. Opening with a discussion of the crises facing the French polity prior to World War Two, we will move on to explore the events, culture, politics and economics of the defeat of 1940, the Vichy regime and its relationship to Nazi Europe, the dynamics of resistance and collaboration, the deportation of Jews and other groups, the highly contested process of Liberation and retribution, and the wars of memory over the meaning of the wartime past. We shall analyze more particularly the impact of the violence of war upon children both in France and in Nazi-occupied Europe. Using secondary and primary texts, films and visual sources, as well as visits to the Paris sites, students will learn about the relationship of the past and the present in producing the history of this period as well as the methodological challenges of using witness accounts in reconstructing the past and will become competent critics and knowledgeable exponents of this essential stretch of French history and historiography.
Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed to allow students to analyze and reenact excerpts from Molière’s plays. We will discover the playwright Molière (1622-1673) who was also an actor, troupe leader, and the author of numerous plays which remain to this day the most frequently staged plays in France. The recurring themes in his plays will be discussed, particularly in relation to the time period during which the plays were written. We will also touch on the role of farce in the work of this playwright who was nicknamed in the 17th century “the foremost joker in France.” Dramatic analysis of the plays chosen will require a comparative study of texts in French and in English.

We will read and analyze these texts out loud. Certain excerpts will need to be memorized. We will analyze the ideas expressed as well as the importance of certain words, of the images evoked, and of the punctuation used in order to bring to life the rhythm and musicality of the phrases. The ultimate objective of this course will be to arouse the creativity of each student with regard to the many possibilities for modern interpretation, notably in reimagining décor, costumes, and Molière’s stances.

The texts studied will be excerpts from the following Molière plays: Tartuffe, The Misanthrope, The Miser, The Bourgeois Gentleman, The Doctor in Spite of Himself, and Don Juan. The students will also be required to read three plays of their choice in their entirety.

Conducted in English.

 

In this course, we will explore the ways in which Paris plays a role in the representation of the subject. Through the study of novels and autobiographies by Breton, Hemingway, Stein, Duras, Modiano, de Beauvoir, and Baldwin, we will ask, what is the role of place in the imagining or invention of the self? How does the experience of a specific city, Paris, influence the formation of identity? How do these authors represent, or subvert, the notion of the ‘real’? Although the focus of this course is literary, we will also engage with major political, cultural, and artistic movements of the period, exploring the ways in which our writers negotiate history through their writings. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

 Prerequisite: FREN-UA 30, or assignment by placement test, or approval of the director.

Assumes a mastery of the fundamental structures of French. May be taken concurrently with FREN-UA9105. Helps the student to develop vocabulary, to improve pronunciation, and to learn new idiomatic expressions. Introduction to corrective phonetics and emphasis on understanding contemporary French through a study of authentic documents; radio and television interviews, advertisements, spontaneous oral productions, etc. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus (Coydon)

Sample Syllabus (Guédon)

 Prerequisite: FREN-UA 30, assignment by placement test, or approval of the director.

Designed to improve the student's written French and to provide advanced training in French and in comparative grammar. Students are trained to express themselves in a variety of writing situations (diaries, transcriptions, narration, letters, etc.). Focuses on the distinction between spoken and written styles and the problem of contrastive grammar. Emphasis is on accuracy and fluency of usage in the written language. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 101, or assignment by placement test.

For students with relative fluency in French who wish to further strengthen their pronunciation and command of spoken French. Develops the skills presented in FREN-UA 9101 through an in-depth study of French phonetics (corrective and theoretical), and analysis of the modes of oral discourse in French. Emphasis is on understanding spoken French (modes of argument, persuasion, emotion, etc.) through analysis of authentic documents and development of student discourse in French. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 105 or assignment by placement test.

Aims to refine students' understanding of and ability to manipulate written French. Students practice summarizing and expanding articles from French magazines and papers and learn how to organize reports and reviews in French. Focuses on the distinction between spoken and written styles and the problem of contrastive grammar. Emphasis on accuracy and fluency of usage in the written language. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 30 or assignment by placement test.

Use of drama and theatre techniques to help students overcome inhibitions in their oral use of language. Exercises and activities are designed to improve pronunciation, intonation, expression, and body language. Students work in collaboration with the professor, trained in the experimental methods of the French director Jacques Lecocq. This semester's focus will be to analyze and reenact excerpts from Molière’s plays.  Conducted in French.

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Advanced Modern Credit.

This course examines the rise of realist and impressionist art in Europe within its cultural, historical and social contexts. The novelty of these two important movements is considered in relation to preceding artistic movements, namely neo-classicism and romanticism. Works by artists such as Delacroix, Courbet, Millet, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec are studied. The course includes both class lectures with slides and museum visits. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

 Art History students: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

In this course we explore the contemporary arts in France in their historic and social context. Beginning with current trends, we attempt to situate what’s new within a longer tradition of artistic production. Themes studied include the nature of the object, the monochrome, the body, the idea of nature, personal mythologies, the importance of light. The course includes visits to contemporary galleries and museums. Conducted in French. 

This course will examine contemporary and classical French theater from a new perspective. Far from scholarly chronological norms, we will use contemporary writings in order to better study their classical sources and inspirations. Theatre is an artistic discipline that is constantly in communication with its past. Theatre examines its roots in order to reorient and renew itself. Actors and directors reinvent the verses of Corneille, Moliere and Shakespeare so that they can better discover the writings of today. Dramaturgists reflect contemporary society, yet are always nourished by their predecessors so that they can either create a connection or break with them definitively. In this course we will examine great contemporary authors such as Jarry, Cocteau, Giraudoux, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, Koltes, Wajdi Mouawad, etc. As for the great classical figures, we will discuss such various authors as Sophocles, Corneille, Shakespeare and Racine. How did Jean-Paul Sartre use Corneille and Racine to give credence to his theatre? How was Cocteau or Giraudoux inspired by ancient theatre? What did Koltes take from classical tragedy in order to create his own dramas? This course will examine both theatrical writings as well as current productions in order to answer these questions. All the performances seen for the course as well as the works read will be discussed in oral presentations or written summaries. Conducted in French.

On December 28th, 1895, cinema was given its official characteristics by the Lumière brothers in Paris. If for over a century, the “Seventh Art” has been an essential element and a vehicle for French culture, the city of Paris has epitomized the evolution and contradictions of the French cinema industry. Focusing on the main tendencies in contemporary French cinema, we will ask the following questions: How do the French filmmakers depict the city of Lights, the City of Love, the City of Horror? How decisive a representation of Paris and its suburbs can be? Why do the images of Paris illustrate the history of French cinema? What do they show about French culture?

Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design Credit or Art History Elective Credit.

This course starts with a study of Gallo-Roman Paris (52-253 A.D.), highlighting archaeological artifacts, temples, thermal baths and theatres. Paris during the Middle Ages is then discussed, focusing on the problem of fortifications, as well as the rise of power of the absolute monarchy supported by the Church. We study the hôtels particuliers (large private residences) such as the Louvre, the Palace of the Ile de la Cité, etc. The arrival of 16th century Italian architectural styles, as illustrated by the Louvre, and their impact on the Parisian architectural landscapes is also discussed. In the modern period we examine the Parisian Arches (Louis XIV and Napoleon I), the urban works of Haussmann (1853-1870), the Eiffel Tower, the Alexander III Bridge with the Grand & Petit Palais and end with a discussion of 20th century architecture and the development of the Défense district. Conducted in French. 

Sample Syllabus

Introduction to French literature and thought in their historical dimension through a close study of selected masterpieces from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. Special emphasis on the aesthetic and intellectual currents that have shaped French literature. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

The purpose of this seminar on European integration is to give the students a few keys in understanding what the European Union is and how it works; how it affects every day policies of the member states as well as the life of European citizens; what kind of world actor the EU is or might become; what political consequences the current financial crisis might have for the EU. Conducted in French.

During the 20th century French language literature underwent a considerable change. Until 1945, only ONE French literature existed, (possibly prolonged by other francophone countries such as Belgium, Switzerland, and French Canada). In 1985, diversity finally seemed to reappear. Thus, the “Salon du livre de Paris” chose the central theme: “Ecrire les langues françaises.”
In this class we will concentrate on francophone novels from Africa that, other than their literary interests, approach questions of postcolonial politics. The objective is to discover and analyze the forms, styles, and themes these novels utilize that reveal a better understanding of the political and cultural issues of the 21st century.

 Conducted in French. 

This course approaches the study of French civilization from the medieval period to World War II through an exploration of fine arts, music, philosophy, literature, and history. A study of major trends, personalities, and events, the course seeks the meaning and a definition of what constitutes the cultural heritage of France. Primary sources and documents such as chroniques, mémoires, journaux, revues, and correspondences are used. Conducted in French.

In this course we explore the multiple interrelations between art and literature, text and image, legibility and visibility. We consider art as it has been inspired by the written word (the Bible, mythology, epic poetry), art as inspired by and inspirational to literary works (Paul Valéry and Degas, Jean Genet and Alberto Giacometti), art as a response to and initiator of 20th century crises in representation, both written and visual (Cubism, Dada, Surrealism). Drawing on the multiple art resources in and around Paris, the course will urge us to reflect on the meanings and signs of language, in its many forms. Conducted in French. 

Sample Syllabus

The course aims to introduce students to contemporary French society through an examination of particular social groups and categories, with a focus on French youth and notions of gender. Through an exploration of contemporary issues and social movements, we will focus on how these groups have been constructed over time as historical and political categories with significant implications for social practice. Students will be encouraged to draw on resources in and around Paris as well as current events as an integral part of the course. Conducted in French. 

This course begins with an examination of the Algerian War (1954-1962), in order to consider its multiple ramifications for France and the Arab world. A long and terrible conflict, the “events” in Algeria, as they were called at the time, signaled the end of the French Empire. It brought down the 4th Republic and gave rise to one of the largest exoduses in modern history, with the departure of over a million people from Algeria to France following Algeria’s independence. The war has had major implications on French-immigrant relations, on the rise of the extreme right National Front in France, on the constitution of the French Jewish population, and on France’s involvement in other Middle Eastern conflicts. The history of French-Algerian colonial relations will also be examined. Conducted in French.


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Accra

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

From its beginnings, cinema in Germany was embroiled in heated debates about its
aesthetic, social and political value: Is cinema a form of art or mere entertainment for
the masses? And what does it mean to be a work of art? What is its significance as
popular medium? Film’s relevance reaches far beyond the worlds it depicts on
screen. It is intrinsically linked to questions of German identity and self-perception.
This course provides an overview of the changing roles of cinema in the turbulent
history of the 20th century in Germany as they manifests in changing visions of the
city. The course aims to give some insight into the competing ideas of intellectual
histories and evaluate them from the angle of the visual medium and to thus offer
insight in the construction of German identity.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students may not register for both this course and Comparative Modern Societies due to content overlap.

This course explores the interstices between State power and the individual in the context of Modern
Berlin and German history. Our exploration of individual confrontations with politics includes a
discussion of how individuals react to State terror––through collaboration or resistance––and how
identities flourish, transform or are extinguished under State policies. One important location for
individual responses to the State is the arts, and we explore in depth how State power has promoted or
stifled these creative voices throughout Europe. Special topics include coercive acculturation in Jewish-
German intellectual life, the destruction of the 20s musical Avant-garde, the rise of the Nazi Aesthetic in
Leni Riefenstahl’s documentaries, the intrusion of State Security (the Stasi) in private life, the photorealist
reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary
reassessment of individual and collective war guilt following reunification. Readings and lectures are
supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and
cultural change that has affected individual experience in situ.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

This course studies modern and contemporary art and architecture through a strategic focus on the cities of Buenos Aires, New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City. We consider key artworks and architectural movements, approaching art history in urban, socio-historical and contextual terms. Emphasis is placed upon the city as a hub for the production and reception of art.

Sample Syllabus

 

A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Sample Syllabus

Open to all students at NYU Buenos Aires.  Contact gallatin.global@nyu.edu for information.

This tutorial connects NYU students with students at Lenguas Vivas, a vibrant public high school in Buenos Aires' Retiro neighborhood. NYU students will mentor high school seniors as they read, discuss and write about a well-known literary text. Conducted in English.

Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU, SPAN-UA 100 or equivalent)

This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primitive art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primitive and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200.

Mitos, íconos y tradiciones inventadas is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course will be structured in seven topics; each topic will be covered in two weeks. During these four classes, students will be exposed to different kinds of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and live concerts.

Sample Syllabus 

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Please visit the NYU Buenos Aires Internships Page for application information. Intermediate Spanish or above is strongly recommended.

This course requires a 90-minute weekly seminar and a minimum of 10 hours fieldwork a week at an approved internship field site. The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Argentine Civil Society. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency. The course provides you with tools to analyze your organization’s approach, its policies, its programs, and the political, legal, social, economic and cultural contexts in which it operates. Guest-speakers are invited to the seminar and case studies on Argentina civil society are discussed.  You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in Florence Program will be given registration priority for this course. This is a 7 week intensive course.  Specific course dates and meeting times  will be posted in ALBERT.

Italian fashion is famous internationally for its combination of quality and elegance. This course explores the development of fashion as an integral part of Italian identity. It looks at four historical moments or movements that played a significant role in developing that identity: Renaissance Florence under the de Medici, Mussolini’s mandate for Italian-based fashion, the post-war Italian film industry in the 1950s and 60s, and, today’s global fashion industry where the image of Italian style is one of quality, luxury and sexy elegance. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course may be counted towards the Cultural Specialization and Elective requirement for Comp Lit majors, with prior DUS approval.

This course focuses on literary representations of WWI and WWII. The online course pack includes examples of the political and military rhetoric to which Montale and Hemingway objected, historical essays and images (war photographs, recruitment posters, etc.), as well as the shorter texts we are studying. Central themes in the course are the concepts of political literature and historical fiction and the contrasting approaches and theoretical premises of classical realism and modernism. Among the supplementary sources available in the Villa Ulivi library are two good cultural histories on the subject: James Shehan Where Have All the Soldiers Gone and Mark Mazower Dark Continent. Other recurring issues will be gender, sexuality, religion, class politics, kitsch, psychoanalysis, rhetoric, and power.  

Sample Syllabus

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in Florence Program will be given registration priority for this course.

Global Fashion Industry: Italy will provide students with a deep understanding of the contemporary fashion industry in Italy, as well as of Italy's position in the global fashion arena. The course will drive students through the entire lifecycle of the fashion business, from forecasting trends to retailing, through design, sourcing, product development and production. Particular attention will be dedicated to different marketing aspects of the process, such as: identity building, brand positioning, merchandising, buying, costing, communication. All levels of retail, from luxury to mass market will be covered. The course will end with an analysis of the new challenges, such as sourcing globalization, emerging markets, sustainability and growing significance of technology.
A strong effort will be put into organizing site visits to studios, showrooms and factories, as well as meeting with professional players.

Each session will be structured to give students an overview of a particular stage of the Industry, through a mix of lectures from the course leader and visiting professionals, studio and showroom visits, walking tours, reading assignments and practical projects.  Conducted in English.

London

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

This interdisciplinary seminar serves as a broad overview for several centuries of British male and female fashion trends, from roughly the Tudor period to today. The course focuses on ways that modes and standards of dress evolved in response to political, economic and technological developments; empire and immigration; changing gender and class formations; and the vagaries of popular culture. In short, the course examines not only what people wore at different historical moments, but why they wore what they did, and how they felt about it. Readings come from the fields of literature, history, art history, gender studies, and sociology.

Sample Syllabus

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

The topic of clothing and adornment embraces a broad spectrum, from the need for protective covering to the desire for individual expression to the profit goal of international industries. Clothing epitomizes the way a fundamental necessity has been transformed by cultural construction---as well as desire and creativity---into a complex social indicator, a matrix of culture, class, gender identity and aesthetics. This course looks at the ways clothing and fashion are used by story tellers, in print and on film, from the ancient world to the modern as indicators of civilization, individuality, sensuality, polymorphous gender, guilt, and conspicuous consumption. In order to establish a critical grid and vocabulary with which to discuss fiction’s use of clothing/fashion our sources will also include readings in cultural studies, art, sociology, economics, fashion theory, and semiotics.

Sample Syllabus

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

In this new course, students will examine the business side of the fashion industry as it exists in Britain. Topics of study will include the emergence of new designers and labels; branding; marketing; manufacture; labor relations; governement subsidies and support; domestic retail and international sales.

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only.

London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape.

This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else. 

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students accepted to this course must indicate on their visa inquiry form that they want a Tier-4 General Student Visa; you will not be permitted to intern (paid or unpaid) in the UK without a Tier-4 visa.A Tier-4 visa costs a minimum of £310 GBP (approximately $527 USD), plus any applicable shipping and expedite fees.

Enrollment by permission only.  Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 16 hours fieldwork per week.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU. EUSA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus


Madrid

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and a minimum of 16 hours of fieldwork per week (two full days). Internship placements are made by EUSA, an internship placement organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Paris

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and two full days and one half day (Monday-Friday) for their internship.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


This course examines aspects of political and social change in France from the end of the French Revolution to the present day. Through an exploration of Paris neighborhoods, monuments and museums, we will look at how the city’s evolution has been inscribed on the urban landscape, and reflect on how history and national identity are imagined, produced and contested through the carving up of urban space. Major dates and events of French political history form the chronological backbone for this course, while class discussions are organized thematically from the perspective of social history and the history of ideas. Classes include walking tours and site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

In this course, we will explore the ways in which Paris plays a role in the representation of the subject. Through the study of novels and autobiographies by Breton, Hemingway, Stein, Duras, Modiano, de Beauvoir, and Baldwin, we will ask, what is the role of place in the imagining or invention of the self? How does the experience of a specific city, Paris, influence the formation of identity? How do these authors represent, or subvert, the notion of the ‘real’? Although the focus of this course is literary, we will also engage with major political, cultural, and artistic movements of the period, exploring the ways in which our writers negotiate history through their writings. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

France and the U.S. have a habit of looking at one another as anti-models when it comes to discussions of assimilation and difference, “race,” identity, community and diversity. In this course, we explore this comparison as a productive means for re-considering these terms. Why is the notion of “ethnic community” so problematic in France? And why do Americans insist on the “homogeneity” of the French nation, even as, at various points throughout modern French history, France has received more immigrants to its shores than the United States? Through readings, film screenings, and site visits we explore the movements and encounters that have made Paris a rich, and sometimes controversial, site of cultural exchange. Topics include contemporary polemics on questions such as headscarves, the banlieue, the new Paris museums of immigration and “primitive” art, affirmative action and discrimination positive, historic expressions of exoticism, négritude, and anti-colonialism. Occasional case studies drawn from the American context help provide a comparative framework for these ideas. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to all NYU Paris students. For NYU Art History students this course counts for Art History Elective Credit.

This course investigates French art of the nineteenth-century, paying particular attention to the way in which historical factors informed artistic production during this period.  Beginning with David, Neo-Classicism and the French Revolution, we will move to the Napoleonic period, Romanticism, the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848, and trace the connection from Realism to Impressionism.  The second half of the course will examine the disparate movements spurred by Impressionism, collectively referred to as Post-Impressionism (including Neo-Impressionism, Synthetism, and Symbolism), and will culminate with the rise of Art Nouveau at the end of the century.  Throughout, we will interrogate how social forces (including politics, gender, race, religion, etc.) influenced the manner in which “Modern” art was produced and understood in nineteenth-century France. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

Civil resistance is not the same as opting out of society or having views that go against the grain. It is fundamentally about deciding not to conform with repressive regimes. It is also about choosing a mode of action that brings with it personal dangers even when, as is usual, it advocates non-violence. This course examines the nature and significance of civil resistance in Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th century. In studying resistance literature (including poetry and song), art and film, we will draw on ideas and arguments from the disciplines of history, political science, literature, art criticism, film studies and psychology.

Syllabus

This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroad of ideas and ideologies as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian systems. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath, showing moral dilemmas of individuals and nations under the Nazi regime as well as revealing the bitter truth of the Stalinist years.

Syllabus

Totalitarian ideologies which were used in European political discourse in the twentieth century to explain major historical changes have changed forever the relationship between the state and its citizens. The aspiration of the totalitarian state to acquire total control over individual lives through control of education, employment and health systems succeeded beyond anything perceived possible until then in any political regime after European Enlightenment. Nazism and Communism mobilized irrationally motivated mass support and won power in a very short time. Their success was partially based on a mass propaganda, using fear as primary instinctive argument against a picture of both external and internal enemies. The major focus of the course will be oriented towards topics trying to explain the reasons for mass support for totalitarian ideologies and states on the basis of individual psychology. We will examine psychological explanations of a selfvictimisation, role of a victim and a perpetrator, majority society response to mass human rights abuses and the abusive past. On this background a phenomenon of a political and cultural dissent will be introduced and discussed. The role of electronic mass media, antiglobalisation movements and global terrorism are discussed as possible modern vehicles of totalitarian tendencies and reactions against them.

Syllabus

"A book must be an ax for the frozen sea in us," wrote Franz Kafka (1883-1924), one of the best known but least understood authors of our times. In this course, we will break some of the clichés which are stuck to Kafka's life and work and dive into the fascinating, intricate and profoundly humorous world of his thoughts and emotions. In Prague, the city that determined and held Kafka in its "claws", we will trace the possible sources of the writer's private obsessions which became the general characteristics of modern men: The sense of isolation, the anxiety, the self-irony, the sense of responsibility and guilt, the quest for freedom, the struggle of an individual against the system. We will read selected works of Kafka, but also Meyrink - the author of Prague ghetto - and Milan Kundera. This course aims to bring the students to a point from which they can find their own genuine and intimate understanding of Kafka's writing.

Syllabus

Shanghai

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Application information available here. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite. 

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

Course is currently under development.  Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by CAPA International (CAPA), an organization partnering with NYU. CAPA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Advertising
Business
Broadcasting
Education
Engineering
Film
Healthcare
Hospitality
Journalism
Politics and International Relations
Public Relations
Social Sciences

The internship course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

In this class students are encouraged to consider the intersectional environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) that they interact with and within, and how their sensibilities differ living away from home to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing. We will engage with a diverse range of readings – featuring many Australian authors – and discuss technical elements and affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Weeks are devoted to crafting the short story, contemporary indigenous storytelling, creative nonfiction, and poetry. The class emphasizes the importance of embodied interaction with the city through a field trip using ‘The Disappearing’ – a downloadable app featuring over 100 site-specific poems spanning a ‘poetic map’ of Sydney, created by The Red Room Company. Students will think about the possibilities of marrying new technologies with writing as they navigate using poems as landmarks. Students shall workshop their drafts during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

Can be counted for SCA-UA Internship credit (government and non-profit placements only).  Can also be counted for Politics major credit (internship with domestic policy focus only)

The seminar is designed to complement the internship fieldwork experience. In it we explore many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

 Students who secure an internship through or with the assistance of NYU Washington, DC must confirm their spot in the program and enroll in the internship class in order to accept the internship. Students are required to pursue 20 hours/ week in their internships to earn course credit. NYU Washington, DC advises that students pursue ~20 hrs/ week in internship committments. If students elect to participate in an internship that exceeds the recommended number of hours, they may be advised to reduce their academic courseload. Students are highly encouraged to consult NYU Washington DC staff for assistance with these decisions.

PLEASE NOTE: Internships that take place in Maryland, regardless of whether credit is awarded for the experience, require that your school or department have a certificate of approval to operate in the state.  If you are interested in a placement in Maryland, please contact global.internships@nyu.ed before applying to the internship for more information.

Syllabus


German Studies

Berlin

This is an introductory course to the language and culture of German-speaking countries for students with no knowledge of German. It focuses on the development of communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbook "Schritte International 1&2", in conjunction with current culture-rich supplemental materials, offers a balanced approach to developing your individual language competence.

Throughout your engagement with the German language you will also learn about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the first part of a four part German course. Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking  countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

This course continues your introduction to the language and everyday culture of German-speaking countries. You will expand your understanding of important vocabulary and customs as well as more advanced language structures and idioms. The focus of the course will continue to spoken communication and everyday language use, but there will also be increased attention to reading and writing assignments. Since the goals of communicative and grammatical competence are ultimately inseparable,students are guided towards using German as accurately as possible.

This course covers the second part of a four part German course. Together, these courses (Elementary I and II and Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

This is an intensive introductory course to the language and culture of German-speaking countries for students with no knowledge of German. The focus of the course will be on communication with emphasis on the use of German in real-life situations, as well as providing knowledge of grammar and vocabulary. At the end of the semester, students will have acquired all the skills usually obtained in the two semesters of Elementary German sequence.

Your engagement with German language will also include learning about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the first two parts of a four part German course. Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of one year of elementary language instruction and to others on assignment by placement examination.

The first intermediate course stresses the acquisition and practice of more sophisticated written and spoken German. The focus is on expanding conversational skills, but the course also includes guided composition practice, vocabulary work, and grammar review. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: GERM-UA 9003, Intermediate German I or equivalent.

Intermediate German II is the second part of a two semester intermediate sequence. You will continue to study grammar, vocabulary and other aspects of language. You will also learn about the cultural and historical context of the German language. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening. This course intends to create a balance between working with intellectually stimulating subjects and practicing the skills needed to communicate in a foreign language.

This course covers the fourth part of a four part German course. Together, these courses (Elementary I and II and Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that will enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work.

Sample Syllabus

In this intensive intermediate course you will continue to study grammar,vocabulary and other aspects of language. You will also learn about the cultural and historical context of the German language. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening. This course intends to create a balance between working with intellectually stimulating subjects and practicing the skills needed to communicate in a foreign language.
Throughout your engagement with the German language you will also learn about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the second two parts of a four part German course.Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intensive Intermediate you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

Conducted in German. Postintermediate - 100 level.

Conversation & Composition is designed for post-Intermediate students of German with a solid grasp of German grammar and vocabulary, who wish to extend their knowledge of the German language, history, and culture through reading, watching films, discussion, and writing. Conversation & Composition is a reading and writing intensive course. Emphasis will be placed on refining written expression and developing the ability to express, discuss, and argue opinions.
This course will give you an overview of recent German political, social and cultural history after 1945 and of the present. Focuses will be on the variant developments in East and West Germany until the fall of the wall and on life in Berlin today. What are the important incidents and changes in German culture and society after 1945? How has the city of Berlin developed since the fall of the wall? These, and similar questions, will accompany us throughout the semester. During the course of the semester, we will explore narratives, which are related to our topics from a variety of genres: narrative prose, newspaper/magazine article, TV/radio documentary, music, film, photo, and other visual material. The class is entirely taught in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening.

Sample Syllabus

Conducted in German. Postintermediate - 100 level.

Der Kurs führt in die Geschichte der deutschen Literatur vom 18. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart ein. Anhand repräsentativer Werke vermittelt er einen Überblick über die verschiedenen Epochen und Gattungen, erste literaturwissenschaftliche Fachbegriffe werden erläutert. Kontinuitäten und Brüche, die als signifikante Entwicklungslinien oder Zäsuren die Literaturgeschichte markieren, werden im historischen und gesellschaftlichen Zusammenhang diskutiert. Der Kurs wird durchgängig in deutscher Sprache unterrichtet.
Es ist das Ziel, in gemeinsamen close readings a) ein Verständnis für die jeweiligen Texte und ihre politischen, kulturellen und sozialen Kontexte zu erarbeiten und b) die Fähigkeit zur wissenschaftlichen Diskussion zu entwickeln. Gefördert wird dies auch durch kleinere spielerische Ein-heiten, in denen wir die Texte in die Gegenwart transferieren und so nach der Aktualität der Werke fragen.

The course provides an introduction into the history of German Literature from the 18th century until today. By reading representative texts, the student will receive an overview of various epochs and genres. In addition, basic terminology of literary studies will be explained. Continuities and disruptions, which influence the history of literature in significant ways, are discussed in their historical and social contexts. The class is taught entirely in German.
The course objectives are a) to develop an understanding of the texts and their political, cultural, and social contexts and b) to develop an ability of critical discussion through a close reading of literary works. This is also fostered by some playful teaching units, in which we transfer the texts into the present and investigate their current relevance.

Sample Syllabus

Conducted in German. Advanced - 300 level.

Im Mittelpunkt des Seminars stehen kulturhistorische Reflexionen des 20.
Jahrhunderts in Kunst und Literatur. Es versteht sich als Überblick und setzt Schwerpunkte in der Kultur-, Literatur- und Kunstgeschichte Deutschlands. So betrachten wir nicht nur verschiedene Epochen der Moderne wie Naturalismus, Dadaismus und Neue Sachlichkeit, sondern setzen uns auch mit epochemachenden Künstlern und Autoren sowie den verschiedenen Wegen, die die Kunst und Literatur in BRD und DDR, einschlägt, auseinander.

Kulturhistorisch betrachten wir Deutschland als Land, das mit der Industrialisierung Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts bis heute vielen Veränderungen ausgesetzt war.Gleichzeitig analysieren wir die Stadt Berlin als Topos in der Kunst und als Ort, wo Kunst stattfindet vom Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts bis zur Gegenwart. Wie wird die Stadt als Ort wahrgenommen und rezipiert? Was für eine (symbolische) Bedeutung wird der Stadt angetragen und welche Rückschlüsse lassen sich auf das kulturelle

Selbstbild der Menschen ziehen? Was ist das für eine Kunst, die in Deutschland und Berlin entsteht und in welchem Verhältnis steht sie zur Stadt/ zur deutschen Geschichte?
Einige Seminartermine finden in verschiedenen Berliner Museen statt. Dabei geht es nicht nur darum, eine fundierte Kenntnis der originalen Objekte zu erwerben, sondern auch die sachgerechte Beschreibung und Grundlagen der wissenschaftlichen Objektanalyse zu trainieren. Die Arbeit vor Originalen versteht sich auch als Voraussetzung eines umfassenden Verständnisses der Bezüge zwischen Literatur und Bildender Kunst und damit der deutschen Kulturgeschichte.

Sample Syllabus

From its beginnings, cinema in Germany was embroiled in heated debates about its
aesthetic, social and political value: Is cinema a form of art or mere entertainment for
the masses? And what does it mean to be a work of art? What is its significance as
popular medium? Film’s relevance reaches far beyond the worlds it depicts on
screen. It is intrinsically linked to questions of German identity and self-perception.
This course provides an overview of the changing roles of cinema in the turbulent
history of the 20th century in Germany as they manifests in changing visions of the
city. The course aims to give some insight into the competing ideas of intellectual
histories and evaluate them from the angle of the visual medium and to thus offer
insight in the construction of German identity.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students may not register for both this course and Comparative Modern Societies due to content overlap.

This course explores the interstices between State power and the individual in the context of Modern
Berlin and German history. Our exploration of individual confrontations with politics includes a
discussion of how individuals react to State terror––through collaboration or resistance––and how
identities flourish, transform or are extinguished under State policies. One important location for
individual responses to the State is the arts, and we explore in depth how State power has promoted or
stifled these creative voices throughout Europe. Special topics include coercive acculturation in Jewish-
German intellectual life, the destruction of the 20s musical Avant-garde, the rise of the Nazi Aesthetic in
Leni Riefenstahl’s documentaries, the intrusion of State Security (the Stasi) in private life, the photorealist
reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary
reassessment of individual and collective war guilt following reunification. Readings and lectures are
supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and
cultural change that has affected individual experience in situ.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three
German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations
of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and
individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions
of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social
theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of
their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of
Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sample Syllabus

This course addresses literary and cultural representations of Berlin in the late 19th
and 20th century. Accordingly, students will investigate different aspects of Berlin
ranging from its growing to a metropolis in the German Empire and its cultural richness
in the Weimar Period to the devastation of the city during World War II; from the
division in the postwar period, which also produced two separate literary systems, to
polyphonic and transcultural texts after reunification. The course will also focus on
Jewish as well as German-Turkish literature. In its theoretical approach, the course
offers insights into new paradigms of cultural studies such as “spatial turn” or
“urbanism” as well as seeks to enhance academic skills in the reflection of gender
aspects. The corpus of readings covers different literary periods and genres from
realism to postmodernism, from prose to lyrics.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines German theater of the twentieth century, from Expressionism to contemporary postdramatic forms of writing and performance. The course will first offer an overview of German theater traditions before 1900 and will then engage in analyzing specific developments in German theater starting with Max Reinhardt and his work at the Deutsches Theater Berlin. Other case studies will focus on Brecht’s epic theater, theater during the Third Reich, postwar theater trends in East and West Germany, and current developments in reunified Germany. Not only will we closely read relevant plays and theory by the theater makers of the respective periods but we will also explore aesthetics and performance issues as they have changed over time. As the involved practice of dramaturgy in Germany has greatly influenced theatrical developments, we will investigate this major aspect of theatrical work in Germany as a contribution to world theater and study how the extensive debate of ideas is being concretely realized in the theater through the choices being made in a production. An integral part of the course will include visits to Berlin theaters, attending performances, which we will analyze in class, and engaging in discussion with contemporary theater makers in Berlin.


Prague

Prof. J. Ager

Using communicative methodology, this course introduces students to essential linguistic and social conventions of spoken German, with an emphasis on establishing conversational skills.

Syllabus

Continuation of Elementary German I.

Syllabus

Using communicative methodology, this course introduces more complex features of the language and focuses on building reading and writing skills while continuing to develop conversational ability.

Syllabus

Continuation of Intermediate German I

Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

Buenos Aires

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.  Advanced Spanish skills (beyond Intermediate II) recommended.

This course combines a seminar based weekly section together with intensive internships in businesses, NGOs or other organizations. The experiential part will consist of 10 weekly hours of work within a pre-arranged organization. The academic part is meant to assist students in getting the most from this experience and provide theoretical and methodological elements to critically examine their experiences. It weaves together research design and methods with an empirical and theoretical examination of recent social phenomena in Argentina. We will use selected themes and topics to explore theoretical perspectives and selected aspects of contemporary Argentine society. In parallel we will explore how to construct a research project, collect data and analyze its contents.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning introduces GLS students to Berlin with an intensive
program of cultural preparation followed by site-dependent research.
The course is divided into 3 blocks (12 sessions) plus 3 sessions for
introduction and student presentations:

a. Orientation
Mapping Berlin I–III

b. Education and Research
Students will be introduced to the educational system as well as to the
local research facilities. Discussions, readings and assignments will
also serve as a preparation for the site-specific projects over the
Spring term.

c. Cultural Preparation and Berlin Today
The sessions will offer a preliminary survey of historical, political,
cultural and social developments during the past century and in
contemporary Berlin: What factors have encouraged and impeded
Berlin's flourishing as a diverse metropolis? Tracing developments
through 20th-century Berlin, the seminars will help to understand the
City’s contemporary debate about history and commemoration.
Special attention will also be paid to current questions of urbanization
and migration. Sessions will largely take place in situ, in locations of
contention and debate.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning I includes both classroom instruction and community experience (whenever practicable, individual community experience).  the principle goal of Experiential Learning I is immersion in the current and historical character of the site.  Classroom instruction provides an interdisciplinary perspective on local, national and global forces that have shaped the character of life in the Italian city.

Sample Syllabus

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in literature, music, and the visual and performing arts from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on global developments in culture. The course covers such literary works as; A Grain of Wheat, the poetry of Adrienne Rich, and;Crime and Punishment; films like;The Battle for Algiers; the art of Picasso and Hokusai; and musical works by Stravinsky and Ali Akbar Khan.

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in philosophy, theology, history, and political science from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on major world discourses about the nature of human identity and society through a comparative study of seminal texts. The course includes such works as The Communist Manifesto,The Wretched of the Earth, and Orientalism.

 

Madrid

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

This course has a strong emphasis on place-based learning methods.  This course consists of two components during the fall semester.  The first part will be an introduction to Spanish society and the second will focus on research methods to facilitate the experiential learning process in both the fall and spring semesters.

Sample Syllabus

Paris

Open to Global Liberal Studies Juniors only.

This is a full-year course divided over two semesters. The first semester course is designed to give students a broad overview of contemporary French society and its institutions while at the same time provide insight into the actual workings of such institutions on the ground. Topics covered include the institutions of the 5th Republic, the functioning of the welfare state, French cultural policy, the organization of local politics, urban issues, and immigration. Frequent site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Shanghai

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

This course aims to complement and enhance the internship experience. Students will learn to critically examine their fieldwork in order to reflect upon what their particular, concrete experience reveals about life in contemporary Shanghai.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning I includes both classroom instruction and community experience (whenever practicable, individual community experience). the principle goal of Experiential Learning I is immersion in the current and historical character of the site.

Sample Syllabus


Global Programs

Accra

This course has three main objectives: a) to enable students to gain insights into the local culture and context, and b) to deepen students’ understanding of Ghana’s and Africa’s relationship with other cultures, especially the West, c) and to equip students with basic communication skills in a local language. To achieve the first two objectives, guest speakers will be invited to talk about specific topics, including the history, society and culture, religion, indigenous and contemporary health and political systems and their relevance in contemporary Ghana. These lectures and discussions will be complemented by site visits and excursions to major historical and cultural sites. It is hoped that these talks and field trips will provide the relevant background information for students to understand some of the issues raised in their classes as well as their day-to-day encounters within their new environment. Regarding the third objective, there will be three introductory lessons in the Twi dialect of Akan, the most widely spoken local language in the country.

This course will combine talks, discussions, field trips and assignments. Four 1 - 1.5hrs guest lectures, two site visits, and two language lessons will form part of the orientation activities in WEEK 0. In the first six weeks of the semester, there will be two additional field trips and film screenings. Each student is expected to write three 2-page reaction/reflection papers on any of the talks, site visits and film documentaries.

Berlin

This course offers a survey of Modern Germany (its history, politics and culture) and an investigation of how Germany's past, always very present, shapes responses to contemporary challenges and new opportunities. The overview investigates not only the country's experiments with authoritarianism - the experiences of mass murder, war and division - but also its emergence as a democratic leader, in the arts and human rights, and as Europe's power broker. We examine questions of citizenship and diversity, Germany's 'special' responsibility as a leader in Europe, the role of the Holocaust in State governance, Berlin's status and development as an industrial and cosmpolitan metropolis, and new avenues for German identity. We ask how these histories have made today's Berlin Europe's most exciting capital - a nexus of youth culture and the interational arts scene - and Germany a vanguard of the arts, sustainable energy, technical development and global politics.

Buenos Aires

The purpose of this class is to introduce the students into key concepts and issues of Contemporary Argentina and its geopolitical context, e.g. Latin America and the World. Through an approach to local, cultural, and political issues the course will address how Argentina interacts with the region and the world, and how this international context impacts on Argentina. The emphasis will be on addressing a number of concepts that are necessary to understand Contemporary Argentina, politics in Buenos Aires and their relationship with the world. Spanish spoken in the Rio de la Plata region will be taught from a pragmatic approach, encouraging the learning and use of local expressions and Argentine Spanish, including political expressions used in the media, political activism and the everyday life of porteños –the inhabitants of Buenos Aires.

Florence

This course provides students with a shared study-away experience at NYU Florence, engages them in the intellectual life of our site, and prepares them for their course work by giving them a basic foundation in the history and culture of Italy. Students also benefit from basic instruction in Italian language; this instruction is designed to supplement their formal language courses and to enable them to function in their new surroundings.

 

London

We often hear that Britain is a global country and London is a global city, but what does this mean? In recent years Britain has undergone striking changes in its social makeup, political outlook and cultural activities. Rapid change also brings tensions around housing, the National Health Service and education all of which are increasingly facing pressures from immigration, larger numbers of unemployed and the economic squeeze. The most recent census suggested Polish was the second is spoken language in Britain. So what is happening and why and how does it affect you as a visiting student?

Global Orientation: British Culture is intended to introduce students to ideas formed by global and local issues and focus on concerns regarding politics, the media, migration, the free market, foreign policy, cultural homogeneity and democracy that are the keys to modern British national identity.
The course in based around a series of lectures and talks by prominent speakers from British politics, culture, economics and the arts, and incorporates various optional excursions into London to see some of what is being talked about in action.

Sample Syllabus

Sample 2

Madrid

The Global Orientations course in Madrid aims to put you (students) in direct contact with Spain, so that you have the opportunity to get to know and engage in Spanish culture and language, regardless of your level of Spanish. This workshop will help you to be able to engage in Spanish culture and language by means of an active, practical and lively learning experience. During Orientation week and over the course of the semester, you’ll attend sessions with NYU Madrid professors, tour Madrid and surrounding cities, visit two of Madrid’s most renowned art museums, take a weekend trip to a different part of Spain, and you’ll have the opportunity to take part in interactive workshops (Spanish cooking, wine or dance). Finally, you’ll read an article that will help you to reflect on your observations of and experiences in Madrid, and you’ll write a brief paper incorporating your conclusions. All in all, Global Orientations seeks to help you make the most of your experience in Madrid so that you leave knowing where you’ve been and how the experience may have affected you as a person.

Paris

This course aims to explore the place that Paris – and more broadly France -- hold in the public imaginary, while examining the tensions and antagonisms that rightfully complicate that view. Through a series of conferences, site visits, and seminars, the course examines four key moments or themes as a means of apprehending the density of French cultural, social, and political life. Starting with French republicanism, past, present, and future, we consider how France, at once the preeminent site of experiments in democratic liberty, is also plagued by institutional entrenchments of class stratification and the dual specters of colonialism and post-colonialism. Turning to Paris, the “capital of modernity,” we reflect on its 19th century emergence as a locus of phantasmagoria, mystery, and seduction, and the emergent capitalist forces that were shaping the urban landscape. We consider the early 20th century avant-garde, among the most important and radical artistic and political movements of our time, that opened new spaces in which to imagine the very terms of “art” and “politics,” to finish with a consideration of France in the contemporary moment, wrestling with global transformations, the crisis of the welfare state, and a tension between the reproduction of elites and a political commitment to equality that increasingly troubles the country’s educational system, politics, and cultural life.

Interdisciplinary and “inter-textual” in scope, the course fuses expert lectures, textual analysis, and out of the classroom experience, to bring together the artistic, the literary, and the social scientific, against the backdrop of global transformation.

Class organization and assignments

This is a required course for all students at NYUParis. Students meet in assigned groups according to their language level; students with an advanced level of French may do their coursework in French. Students are expected to attend all conferences and site visits, to do the assigned readings and to participate in class discussions.

 

Prague

The purpose of this class is primarily to discuss the history and culture of the Czech Republic and Central Europe—the intersection of many international influences--in the context of globalization and, conversely, to discuss globalization in the local context. An important dimension of the class will be a discussion about how international students should use their experience abroad (in this case Prague and, more generally, Central Europe) to better understand complicated developments on the global level and back at home.

Sydney

Australian society is replete with contradictions. Aussies famously describe their nation as the lucky country, yet from the Indigenous perspective, it might more aptly be called the stolen country. Australia is the land of the fair go, which cruelly detains refugees; a multicultural nation with a history of a white Australia policy; a place with distinctive local traditions, which takes many of its cues from global culture; an easy-going country with a surprisingly large degree of governmental control over individual liberties; a highly urbanised population that romances the Bush and the Outback as embodying ‘real’ Australia; a nation proud of its traditions of egalitarianism and mateship, with numerous rules about who is allowed in ‘the club’; a society with a history of anti-British and anti-American sentiment that simultaneously hold strong political allegiances and military pacts with Britain and the USA; and a place with a history of progressive social policy and a democratic tradition, which has never undergone a revolution. This course strives to make sense of Australian society and culture by exploring the complexities and contradictions in Australia’s self-image.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

This course is designed to help you understand contemporary Israel – the society, its problems and its pre-occupations. Together with tours and special lectures, the first half of the course will focus on some historical background. (The facts are important, but no one in the Middle East agrees on “the facts.” In this part of the world, debates about the past have a huge impact on the present.) Without going too much into the past, we will examine the formative events of Israeli society, those events that explain the special features of Israel today – its politics, institutions, culture, popular thinking and more. The course will begin in 1948 and progress to contemporary issues, including the most controversial ones.

Washington, DC

This course will introduce students to the citizens and communities in and of Washington, DC. Students will learn about the unique history of the city by exploring how it was founded, designed, governed and developed to become an international capitol. We will examine components of culture and intercultural competence as we learn how diverse populations maintain their cultural identity, support their communities and integrate into the fabric of the city. The portrayal of the Washington, DC in film will be presented to help students understand how this reflects and shapes our understanding of contemporary and historical American political culture. The course will also examine how individuals leverage their positions through institutions and organizations to ignite change in areas such as environmental sustainability, political activism, and international causes. Stakeholders from United States and foreign government agencies, domestic and international organizations, the non-profit and for-profit sectors, as well as public and private groups will deliver guest lectures and join interactive discussions. These sessions will be developed in collaboration with faculty from major pathway disciplines for the site and complimented by field experiences including a walking tour and museum visit in Washington, DC. Students will consider the current state of affairs and be challenged to imagine how the future might be different. Respectful, factual, passionate and influential dialogue will be encouraged and expected.

Syllabus


Global Public Health

Accra

This course will examine some of the key issues and principles of environmental health practice. It will focus on the how environmental health issues are defined and approached by civic groups, governmental officials and researchers. It will highlight how environmental threats come to the attention of the public and weigh the options for addressing these threats. Finally, it will underscore the need for multi-disciplinary approaches in understanding these threats and crafting solutions. We will focus on prevention of environmentally mediated diseases and discuss challenges to effective prevention.

 

This course will examine the various dimensions of the field of public health and how the public’s health is protected. Students explore the ways social, economic, and political forces influence the health of populations. Additionally, this course will focus upon some of the current ethical public health dilemmas where the rights of the individual versus the rights of society come into conflict. The course makes use of diverse methods of instruction, including, but not limited to, small group discussion, group exercises, mini-lectures, student debates, field-based group projects and student presentations. Students may be involved in gathering information and observations from projects outside of the classroom at government, NGO and health care institutions.

Sample Syllabus

For Global Public Health Majors

The global health undergraduate internship has a three-fold goal: It: 1) broadens the student’s exposure to public health issues, 2) facilitates opportunities for student’s to observe public health work and leadership in action, and 3) increases the student’s knowledge of specific career opportunities. The internship is a semester long course where the student engages in fieldwork (a minimum of 90 hours) and attends in-class seminar sessions. The integration of didactic and practice experiences provide the student with opportunities to critically reflect on the fieldwork experience, complete a public health project that is mutually beneficial to the student and the organization, and synthesize public health knowledge, skills, and attitudes.


Course Objectives
• apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained from public health courses to global health practice setting(s)
• observe the culture, milieu, goals, work-ethic, and deliverables of a public health professional and/or public health practice
• enhance basic leadership skills in establishing, developing, and refining interpersonal and work relationships
• enhance critical thinking , analytic, and problem solving skills
• broaden awareness of public health career opportunities
• contribute to the internship site through the completion of an appropriate public health project or task
 

Buenos Aires

Epidemiology is the science that studies the distribution and determinants of health and illness in human populations. It is intimately related to public health and policy making, as it provides elemental “information for action”. This course is designed to introduce students to the history, basic principles and methods of epidemiology.

Topics covered in this course are history, background and different perspectives of epidemiology, measures of disease frequency; measures of association; epidemiologic study designs; public health surveillance; outbreak investigations; assessment of causality; and relationship between epidemiology and public health policies. In addition, students are expected to develop skills to critically read, interpret and evaluate health information from published epidemiological studies and mass media sources.

Sample Syllabus

This course is currently marked as tentative, pending the approved appointemnt of an instructor.

This course introduces students to key concepts in health policy formation, implementation and evaluation in a global context. Using a comparative lens, students explore organization, financing and delivery of health care services and health systems around the world. We examine the role of governmental and non-governmental agencies in delivering care and contributing to a health care infrastructure using case studies and other materials in a comparative approach. Key lessons in the implementation of new health policies and initiatives are explored across the developing world, as well as in a US as students explore health system performance, the quality and cost of care, the management of health care services, the process of health improvement and health reform. The course will use a multidisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economics, and ethical perspectives. The objective is to build an understanding of the fundamental ideas, issues, and problems currently debated in global health policy and management and to provide a foundation for future studies and careers in the global health field. Epidemiology in a Global World and Health and Society in a Global Context are recommended but not required pre-requisites for the course.

London

Please note that this course is currently under development.  Actual course description may vary.

By the end of this course students will develop the ability to understand the evolution and current role of epidemiology as an approach to assessing public health problems; describe epidemiological approaches to defining and measuring health problems in defined populations; understand how epidemiologic studies are designed, implemented and analyzed; understand the concepts of measurement of test performance and be able to apply these concepts of testing and screening in a range of health and other settings; understand and apply epidemiological criteria needed to establish cause and effect relationships; understand, and apply key ethical issues to the conduct of epidemiological and other scientific investigations; conduct library research to find information on diseases and other health conditions; and critically read and understand health information.

Sample Syllabus

Please note that this course is currently under development.  Actual course description may vary.

This course will examine the various dimensions of the field of public health and how the public’s health is protected. Students explore the ways social, economic, and political forces influence the health of populations. Additionally, this course will focus upon some of the current ethical public health dilemmas where the rights of the individual versus the rights of society come into conflict. The course makes use of diverse methods of instruction, including, but not limited to, small group discussion, group exercises, mini-lectures, student debates, field-based group projects and student presentations. Students may be involved in gathering information and observations from projects outside of the classroom at government, NGO and health care institutions.

Sydney

For Global Public Health Majors

The global health undergraduate internship has a three-fold goal: It: 1) broadens the student’s exposure to public health issues, 2) facilitates opportunities for student’s to observe public health work and leadership in action, and 3) increases the student’s knowledge of specific career opportunities. The internship is a semester long course where the student engages in fieldwork (a minimum of 90 hours) and attends in-class seminar sessions. The integration of didactic and practice experiences provide the student with opportunities to critically reflect on the fieldwork experience, complete a public health project that is mutually beneficial to the student and the organization, and synthesize public health knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

Course Objectives
• apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained from public health courses to global health practice setting(s)
• observe the culture, milieu, goals, work-ethic, and deliverables of a public health professional and/or public health practice
• enhance basic leadership skills in establishing, developing, and refining interpersonal and work relationships
• enhance critical thinking , analytic, and problem solving skills
• broaden awareness of public health career opportunities
• contribute to the internship site through the completion of an appropriate public health project or task
 

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Hebrew and Judaic Studies

Tel Aviv

Active introduction to modern Hebrew as it is spoken and written in Israel today. Presents the essentials of Hebrew grammar, combining the oral-aural approach with formal grammatical concepts. Reinforces learning by reading of graded texts. Emphasizes the acquisition of idiomatic conversational vocabulary and language patterns.

Continuation of Elementary Hebrew I.

Builds on skills acquired in Elementary Hebrew I and II and develops a deepening command of all linguistic skills. Modern literary and expository texts are read to expand vocabulary and grammatical knowledge, with conversation and composition exercises built around the texts. Introduces selections from Israeli media. Addresses the relationship between classical and modern Hebrew.

Continuation of Intermediate Hebrew I.

Aimed at training students in exact and idiomatic Hebrew usage and at acquiring facility of expression in both conversation and writing. Reading and discussion of selections from Hebrew prose, poetry, and current periodical literature.

Designed to provide a thorough grounding in Hebrew grammar with special emphasis on phonology, morphology, and syntax. Concentrated study of vocalization, accentuation, declensions, conjugations, and classification of verbs

Prague

 

One hundred and fifty years ago all Jews had three things in common: every Jew prayed in Hebrew, he submitted to God‘s commandments and awaited the coming of the Messiah. Today, Jews have only one thing in common – every Jew asks what it means to be a Jew.“ These are words of David ben Gurion after the Second World War. The period of the 18th to the 20th centuries of modern Jewish history in Europe belongs to the most dynamic in the whole Jewish history. What are the reasons for such radical changes? Were there differences between the development in Western, Central and Eastern Europe?  How did the changes affect Jewish religious, cultural, linguistic and national identity? These questions build the core of this course.

Syllabus

 


History

Accra

The course examines the rise, growth, effects, and the abolition of the Atlantic Slave trade as well as its legacy. The course begins with a discussion of the nature of West African society before the introduction of the Atlantic Slave Trade; and the relations among Asante peoples, other neighboring West African peoples, the indigenous slave trade, and relations with Europeans in the Atlantic Slave Trade. The Atlantic Slave trade itself is analyzed from historical, ethnographic, sociological, economic and political perspectives, focusing on Africa, Europe and the Americas. The immediate and long term effects of the Slave Trade on Africa are considered, as well as the history of the trade's Abolition, and the legacy of the Atlantic Slave trade in African, European and American societies.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

The course examines significant moments in the development of Europe’s and America’s notions
and images of one another from the 18th century to the present. The in-depth discussion
will be based upon historical documents and cultural texts with equal attention to sources
from America/the US and Europe/Germany in an effort to explore and evaluate the major
theoretical and rhetorical paradigms (and the shifts therein) informing the perceptions as well
as cultural constructions of the “other” past and present. Moreover, the course will investigate
and evaluate recent manifestations of Anti-Americanism and analyse the ideo-logical and
cultural coordinates of current anti-American concepts in Europe/Germany as well as concepts
of Europe as a socio-cultural model for the 21st century. In conclusion, the politics of the
current US-Administration will be discussed in terms of their impact on transatlantic relations
as well as on dealing with global challenges, particularly in the Middle East.

Sample Syllabus

Students may not register for both this course and Berlin's History & Culture due to content overlap.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the major
events and principal problems in German history in the twentieth century. Through
lectures, readings, and discussions the weekly classes will familiarize students with
the conceptual narratives and methodological interpretations of twentieth century
German history. Germany´s path to nation-building in 1871, the challenges of
modernization in Imperial Germany, Weimar´s struggle between liberal-democratic
and conservative-authoritarian forces, Germany´s politics in the two world wars in
1914/18 and 1939/45, and the construction of two Germanys after 1945 will be
contextualized within broader frameworks of European development. Political, social,
and cultural turning points will be discussed alongside key events in European
history, such as diplomatic conflict prior to 1914, the crisis of democracy in Interwar-
Europe, the rise of Fascism, the Second World War, the Cold War, the protest
movements of 1968, Eastern European Dissident Movements and the final collapse
of communism in 1989, as well as the current challenges in European politics.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students may not register for both this course and Comparative Modern Societies due to content overlap.

This course explores the interstices between State power and the individual in the context of Modern
Berlin and German history. Our exploration of individual confrontations with politics includes a
discussion of how individuals react to State terror––through collaboration or resistance––and how
identities flourish, transform or are extinguished under State policies. One important location for
individual responses to the State is the arts, and we explore in depth how State power has promoted or
stifled these creative voices throughout Europe. Special topics include coercive acculturation in Jewish-
German intellectual life, the destruction of the 20s musical Avant-garde, the rise of the Nazi Aesthetic in
Leni Riefenstahl’s documentaries, the intrusion of State Security (the Stasi) in private life, the photorealist
reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary
reassessment of individual and collective war guilt following reunification. Readings and lectures are
supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and
cultural change that has affected individual experience in situ.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU SPAN-UA 100 Advanced Grammar & Composition or equivalent.)

Este curso ofrece a los estudiantes una visión panorámica de los grandes procesos económicos, políticos y sociales de la historia argentina desde la emancipación del imperio español hasta la transición democrática, a comienzos de la década de 1980.

Las actividades previstas contemplan el dictado de clases teórico-prácticas y una serie de visitas culturales. Para las clases se ha dispuesto un conjunto de lecturas obligatorias apoyadas, en algunos casos, por una bibliografía general que dará al alumno el contexto fáctico de cada unidad temática. Se propiciará el intercambio de ideas entre los participantes por lo cual la lectura previa es indispensable para seguir el curso. Las actividades culturales previstas tienen como objetivo vincular a los alumnos con la dimensión material de la historia, poniéndolos en contacto con espacios claves para su comprensión.

 Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus coming soon

Public intellectuals have an important role to play in society: they are supposed to speak the
truth. They struggle to direct public debate towards clearer visions of the day’s challenges and to
keep our minds open to wider possibilities and different explanations. They excel at pointing out
the common fallacies of our age. Most often dissenters, in the minority in their own countries,
public intellectuals are deeply committed to independent thinking at (often) considerable
personal sacrifice. Simultaneously observers and participants, “insiders” and “outsiders”,
consensus builders and social critics, thinkers and occasionally active politicians, these public
figures are central to modern democratic dialogue. Not surprisingly, considerable controversy
accompanies the appearance of (many) university-trained professionals in the public sphere, and
the discussions they initiate have been characterized quite often by bitter and personal attacks.

This course examines the work and contributions of several prominent intellectuals in crucial
periods of contemporary European history over the 20th and 21st centuries, and considers
their important roles in public debate, policy-making and the political process. Their writings
focus on the important issues of their time – war and peace, economic instability, dictatorship,
European integration, organized crime, the collapse of European communism and post-industrial
capitalism – concerns that are still very much of relevance and debate today. Finally, the course
also considers the “theory” of public intellectuals by looking at the writings on their own place
in society and on the models of participation that others, like them, have offered in the past.

The class has a seminar format with discussion of the principal works of a number of public
intellectuals and their biographies framing the weekly sessions. We will also explore the
historical context of these works and consider, with the advantage of hindsight, the relative
accuracy of the positions assumed in the past – did they really come close to “telling the
truth” as we understand it today? The reactions of the public, of political leaders, and of other
prominent individuals are also examined to better consider the impact of these intellectuals’
contributions and to appreciate the measure of their commitment to freedom and open
discussion.

Sample Syllabus

What is the role of the family in Italy? Italy is well-known for being a family centered society.
What are the causes and consequences of this phenomenon? Since the 1960s, the family has
undergone a series of changes, due to the women’s movement, decrease of marriages, fall of
birthrate, etc. Is the family loosing its centrality in Italy? According to some scholars, the family
is still one of the few shared values in Italy. The course will investigate the social function of the
family in Italy, from the political unification of the country to the present. We will also analyze
ideas of femininity and masculinity conveyed by the media and their connections to the idea
of Italianness. The imagined Italian community was constructed on the site of the female body
which was meant to epitomize a series of values such as fertility, health, prosperity, purity,
tradition, etc. The course will also map the condition of women and LGBT people in Italy today.

Sample Syllabus

The aim of the course is to follow the evolution of religious ideas and practices throughout the period that goes from early Renaissance to the years of the reorganization of the Catholic Church after the Council of Trent. The geographical area covered will include the countries of southern Europe (mainly Italy, but also Spain, France and Portugal) and the German World. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

The Renaissance began and reached maturity in Italy between 1350 and 1500. This course closely examines the political, economic, and social situations in Italy during this period, emphasizing the special conditions that produced Renaissance art and literature. The relationship between culture, society, and politics is studied in the case of Florence, in which the hegemony of the Medici house and its patronage brought the city to cultural leadership in the Western world. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

London

A survey of Europe from 1789 to the present. Investigates the political, social, economic, and cultural developments that shaped and continue to shape the modern age. Emphasis is on the evolution of the nation-state, on industrialization and its impact on society and politics, and on the intellectual responses to the rapid changes these developments inspired. Topics include Europe and the French Revolution; the rise of the nation-state, 1848-1914; and the impact of totalitarian ideologies on 20th-century Europe.

Sample Syllabus

An introductory course dealing with the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the origins of Islam; the beliefs and practices of the Islamic community; differences between Sunni and Shiite Islam; Sufism; the spiritual, intellectual, and artistic life of the Islamic commonwealth; and modern Islamic revival. 

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: Does not count toward the major or minor in Middle Eastern Studies.

The course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London's changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world has ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size. Each week (unless there is a field trip) there will be a lecture and a discussion in which you will be able to present ideas and information gathered from lectures and from your weekly reading. There will also be four walking tours of parts of London which relate to the period we are studying at a particular time. 

Sample Syllabus

Covers the impact of World War II, the postwar division of Europe, the onset of the cold war, the economic recovery and transformation of Western Europe, Stalinism in Eastern Europe, the 1960s and events of 1968, the origins and development of the European community, and the cultural and intellectual life of European nations in this period. Ends with a discussion of the Eastern European revolutions of 1989 and their significance, together with the reunification of Germany, for the future of the continent. 

Sample Syllabus

This course will focus on a history of Modern Imperialism from the beginning of the nineteenth century to post-Second World War decolonisation: with particular reference to the British Empire.

Sample Syllabus

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the place that slavery played in Britain's past and its legacy today. In the eighteenth century, Britain prided itself on the liberty enjoyed by its people, yet it was the largest participant in the Atlantic slave trade, and grew rich on the wealth created by ports such as London, Bristol and Liverpool. In the same period some 15,000 black people lived in English ports and their presence has only recently been properly acknowledged. In the nineteenth century, however, Britain perceived itself as in the forefront of the global battle to end the slave trade and slavery itself. This pioneering campaign contributed to a more positive sense of British national identity. Yet Britain continued to depend on the importation of slave-grown produce and even began to ship hundreds of thousands of Indians as virtual slaves to many parts of the world. The ambivalent legacy of Britain’s past involvement with slavery remains important to Britain's multi-cultural identity and its global role today. 

Sample Syllabus

Paris

This course examines aspects of political and social change in France from the end of the French Revolution to the present day. Through an exploration of Paris neighborhoods, monuments and museums, we will look at how the city’s evolution has been inscribed on the urban landscape, and reflect on how history and national identity are imagined, produced and contested through the carving up of urban space. Major dates and events of French political history form the chronological backbone for this course, while class discussions are organized thematically from the perspective of social history and the history of ideas. Classes include walking tours and site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

A historical and political inquiry into the French system of relations with Francophone Africa from the ‘race to Empire’ in the 19th century to the current day. The main goals of the course are: to describe the historical development of French-African relations from the colonial to the post-independence era; to investigate the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of French influence in contemporary Francophone Africa; to understand the consequences for France of complex developments subsequent to colonialism, such as African immigration in France. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the crucial decade lasting from mid 1930s to the Liberation of France from German Occupation in 1944, while also going well beyond those chronological and geographical parameters. Opening with a discussion of the crises facing the French polity prior to World War Two, we will move on to explore the events, culture, politics and economics of the defeat of 1940, the Vichy regime and its relationship to Nazi Europe, the dynamics of resistance and collaboration, the deportation of Jews and other groups, the highly contested process of Liberation and retribution, and the wars of memory over the meaning of the wartime past. We shall analyze more particularly the impact of the violence of war upon children both in France and in Nazi-occupied Europe. Using secondary and primary texts, films and visual sources, as well as visits to the Paris sites, students will learn about the relationship of the past and the present in producing the history of this period as well as the methodological challenges of using witness accounts in reconstructing the past and will become competent critics and knowledgeable exponents of this essential stretch of French history and historiography.
Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus

Prague

Prof. S. North
The process of urbanization in the modern era has reflected the economic differences, the social and aesthetic customs, and the political nuances of the European nations and of Europe as a whole. Students will consider numerous issues of city planning and growth. Topics will include patterns of cultural distinctiveness, the influence of ethnic and religious concerns, and the political implications apparent in architectural design, neighborhood development, housing policies, and public space.

Syllabus

In the 20th Century, three phenomena had fateful consequences for Central and Eastern Europe: (1) the unsuccessful attempt to eliminate, after WWI, national tension by creating new nation-states, and the encounters with both major totalitarian ideologies, (2) Nazism and (3) Communism. The present eruptions of nationalism are rooted in the heritage of these phenomena. Comparative histories of the formation of modern national identities, including the 'national awakening' of non-dominant nations, will be interpreted against the backdrop of national policies of multi-ethnic states, national programs and leaders. The major focus of the course will be oriented toward topics surrounding post-WWI Central and Eastern Europe, Nazism and Communism. We will examine the disintegration of post-Communist Central and Eastern Europe, discuss the ethnic conflicts, policies toward minorities and xenophobia. The bibliography of required and recommended reading will be handed out in class, the abbreviated titles are in the syllabus. The guidelines for mid-term and finals will be available in class two weeks before the scheduled exam.

Syllabus

Shanghai

In this course we will select a number of critical issues in modern Chinese history to examine the political, social and cultural transformations of modern China. Topics of lectures include Confucianism and its modern fate, popular movements, the Great Leap Forward Movement, the role of Shanghai in modern China, Tiananmen Movement and the prospect of Chinese political reforms. The course will be approached through lectures, site visits, class discussions, and research.

Sample Syllabus

From the Warring States period to the present, what have Chinese and others understood to be the meaning of “China,” and what have been the broad implications of this understanding? This course is divided into four chronological periods: Antiquity—from the period of the ‘central kingdoms’ to the formation of the early empire; Middle Period—China Among Equals; Early Modern: 1350-1910—China, Global Trade, and Imperialism; Modern: 1910-present—China Redux

Washington, DC

This survey course will focus on the historical development of U.S. federal authority and capacity over public lands and resources, including the germination and expansion of the idea of a coherent public interest with respect to air, water, forests, landscapes, and other environmental attributes. The course will address U.S. environmental policy through several lenses, including (1) a set of two introductory sessions in which students are introduced to key terminology, concepts, and orientations toward the domain of environmental policy; (2) a core series of fourteen sessions through which we survey how historical precedents have shaped contemporary U.S. environmental policies and programs; and (3) a concluding set of three sessions through which we review several unfolding environmental policy topics (e.g., climate change, invasive species, or hydraulic fracturing).


Italian Studies

Florence

Students will gain understanding of the basic messages in simple oral and written
communication. They will be able to acquire key information from listening and reading brief, simple, authentic material and have a fair understanding of the meaning of short standard Italian conversation in a limited number of content areas. Students will be able to engage in basic conversation
as well as to initiate communication on familiar topics. Strong emphasis will be given to communicative
situations involving first and second person forms; writing activities with pertinent vocabulary
and structure will include simple autobiographical information, brief messages, simple forms and lists. Linguistic structures : subject pronouns, articles, adjectives, prepositions, present and present perfect indicative.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Elem I

Students will gain understanding of oral and written material on a variety of topics, ranging from personal routine to include family, taste and hobbies. Their understanding will include present and past events. Students will be able to engage in conversations on a variety of real-life situations regarding familiar subjects, to respond to open-ended questions and initiate communication on these topics. They will be able to give and follow directions, instructions and commands. Skills in mono-directional oral presentation will begin to emerge. Writing activities will include narration of present and past events, personal experiences, school and work situations, as well as brief messages to family and friends. Linguistic structures: subject and object pronouns, articles, adjectives, present indicative and imperative, the two main past tenses in use in contemporary Italian.

This daily course immerses students in the Italian language. The basic structures and vocabulary of the Italian language are presented. Students are also provided with systematic practice of oral Italian through dialogues, pattern drills, and exercises. Special emphasis is given to correct pronunciation, sound placement, and intonation. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Elem I & II or Intensive Elementary Italian

Students will gain understanding of oral and written communication on various topics in the past, present and future in addition to expressions of personal wishes, feelings and hopes.
Students will recognize key information in the reading and listening of authentic material and will understand, to some extent advanced texts featuring narration and description of events.
Students will be able to handle most conversation tasks and standard social situations. Students will be able to write short letters and short paragraphs and show command of simple sentence syntax. Linguistic structures: students will be familiar with increasingly complex grammatical content, such as indirect and combined pronouns, future tense, conditional and subjunctive modes.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Interm I

Students will gain understanding of oral and written material ranging from general routine and leisure time activities, to more complex topics such as politics, environmental issues, and work environment. Students will be able to read and appreciate pertinent authentic texts. Students will be able to handle most uncomplicated conversation tasks and standard social situations. Students will be able to debate and argue for opposite viewpoints on a range of topics, to make comparisons and hypothesis. Presentation skills, written and oral, will solidify; skills in narrating in paragraphs begin to emerge and develop in a creative direction. Linguistic structures: students will gain knowledge of increasingly complex verbal forms such as all tenses of the subjunctive mode, past conditional and preterit, as well as several elaborate grammatical structures.

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 1 & ITAL-UA 2, Elementary Italian I & II; or ITAL-UA 10, Intensive Elementary Italian

This course offers students who are at the intermediate level a daily immersion class. The acquisition and practice of more sophisticated structures of Italian are undertaken. Fundamental oral and written skills are developed, and vocabulary enrichment and conversational ability are emphasized. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 11, ITAL-UA 12, Intermediate Italian I & II; or ITAL-UA 20, Intensive Intermediate Italian

Intensive review of Italian grammar through written and oral exercises, conversations, compositions, translation, and readings from contemporary Italian literature. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 30, Advanced Review of Modern Italian

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in speaking present-day Italian. Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students develop vocabulary in a variety of topics, improve pronunciation, and learn an extensive range of idiomatic expressions. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 30, Advanced Review of Modern Italian

Students will view and discuss Italian films to enrich their knowledge of language and culture, including: classic films; contemporary films, which we will compare with the classics; films in current release and available in the theaters of Florence. Through creative activities, students will work to improve their writing, reading and vocabulary, as well as their skills of observation, comprehension and interpretation. Students will discuss the themes presented by the various films and their place within both Italian history and the history of Italian cinema. Students will address the different elements that make up the text of each film: direction, screenplay, sound score, cinematography and editing.

Sample Syllabus 

Florence is often called the “birthplace of the Renaissance.” Is this epithet still valid? This course examines Florentine art and culture from approximately 1400 to 1600 in an attempt to offer a fresh assessment of the contribution made by the city to world culture.

The course is divided into three modules: the Early Renaissance Republic; Laurentian Florence and the Medici in Exile; and the Princely State. For each of these sections, selected artworks and literary texts provide primary sources for analysis and class discussion. Works by artists such as Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Filippo Lippi, Donatello, Leonardo, MIchelangelo, Vasari, Bronzino and Cellini, will be examined together with poems, letters, biographies and autobiographies written by Lucrezia Tornabuoni, Lorenzo the Magnificent, Machiavelli, MIchelangelo, Vasari and Cellini.

Lectures on Florentine history and art will complement class discussions of artworks and texts. Site visits will provide an opportunity for direction examination of key works of architecture, painting or sculpture and serve as stimulus for dialogue about these.

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

This course analyzes Dante's poetry in itself and as an object of translation and adaptation. The text of the Divine Comedy, a 14,000-line journey through the afterlife, will be studied in terms of its transmission and reception in contemporary culture. Emphasis will be put on Dante's influence on literature, art, music, media and film. The text is read in translation with references to the original Italian facing text. Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

This course provides students with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilization of ancient Italy from 1000 B.C. to 200 A.D. The lectures will examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning and the minor arts of the period. The course will include local field trips to important sites and exhibits. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

Presents a study of post-World War II Italian politics and society in comparative and historical perspective. Seeks explanations of Italian political development in specific historical factors such as the 19th century patterns of state formation and the experience of fascism. Comparative analysis seeks to show how the social structure, political culture, and party systems have shaped Italy's distinct development. Current and recurrent political issues include the problem of integrating the south into the national economy and state response to social movements, particularly terrorism. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus coming soon

Urban culture is complex, fantastic, frightening, and a part of daily life, encompassing everything from the opera to street musicians, the public library to the piazza, the theater to local cafes and social clubs. This course, where cities are considered to be sources of cultural invention, explores through literature, history, social science and student experience, the evolution of high and popular culture, both modernist and post-modern. Emphasis will be placed on how cultures create bonds between specific interest groups, and how culture becomes the arena for acting out or resolving group conflict. This course will focus on Italian cities, including Florence. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Starting from Villa La Pietra, this course explores the connection between the history of the Italian villa and the economy, architecture, art, and landscape. Historical and economic reasons have contributed to the unique typology of the Florentine landscape and the relationship between the villa, the farmer house and the "podere." The course examines the original development of the villa and the ideology of country life in Florentine culture and society. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

The course covers the evolution of Italian opera from its beginnings in Florence to the early 20th century with special emphasis on Monteverdi, Rossini, Donizetti, Verdi and Puccini. The approach is multidisciplinary and aims at a comprehensive survey of the music theatre in the context of the Italian cultural heritage. Literary sources, musico-dramatic features, vocal styles are studied in connection with major works that best represent trends and genres in the Italian operatic tradition. Students are expected to master the distinctive characteristics of such genres as favola in musica, intermezzo, opera seria, opera buffa, grand opera, dramma lirico, and the basic elements of Italian versification. Students listen to and watch recorded operas and attend performances in Florence or other Italian cities. Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus

This course presents an investigation on the transformations of political communications in period between the so-called Italian "Second Republic", dominated by the larger-than-life and ubiquitous presence of media tycoon and sports entrepreneur Silvio Berlusconi, and the recent emergence
of Internet-based political movement Movimento Cinque Stelle (Five Stars Movement), led by former stand-up comedian and prominent blogger Beppe Grillo. In the course, students will be introduced to the main political and cultural features of this period, spanning two decades, that has witnessed a high level of interpenetration between the political sphere and the media sphere, with a constant interchange of cultural, financial and institutional dynamics. 

Sample Syllabus


Journalism

Buenos Aires

NYU Media, Culture, & Communication students can take this course for major/minor credit.

In this course students will develop, pitch, research, report, write, edit and present original articles of various kinds on several subjects throughout the semester. Using the city and people of Buenos Aires as their focus, students will work in teams for some projects and individually for others to hone their skills as observers, interviewers, reporters and writers.

Sample Syllabus

Accra

The class will explore the sociocultural and philosophical context of the media industry and the practice of mass communication in Africa in general, and Ghana in particular. This broad perspective will be examined against the background notion that the media do not function in a vacuum. Thus, students will examine how these contexts, informed by the dominant philosophies and macro-institutional practices of society, mitigate or even dictate the operations of the media. As a special focus, we will examine the significance of the liberalization of the airwaves in emerging democracies such as Ghana.

Sample Syllabus

London

Students in this course must also register for the Methods and Practice Theatre visit on Thursday evenings.

This course carries an additional fee of $367 to cover the cost of theatre tickets. Students should also be prepared to pay up to £100 or $167 for extra tickets while in London as part of the Methods & Practice course.

Using the cultural life of London as its focus, this course aims to enable students to report on the diversity of cultural and artistic activity in the British capital across the spectrum, with an inevitable focus on theatre and live performance (classical music/opera, classical and contemporary dance) given the professor's own ongoing career as a theatre critic; other art forms, including art, television, and film, are considered, as well, depending on what is on in the capital at any given time. Numerous forms and techniques will be explored through la mixture of lecture, discussion, and student presentations, and students will be required to follow the work of several critics throughout the term even as they develop their own critical voice and methodology. At every turn, the course aims to wed the specific cultural goings-on in London during the semester to the methods and practice necessary to respond to and evaluate the work on offer.

Sample Syllabus

Designed to interrogate the impact of various forms of media on "society" and various notions of society on "media." Students consider conventional and unconventional media in Britain - from the London Times to movies to fashion magazines - in an effort to interpret British culture. The key question is not "Is this text 'good'?" but "What does this text mean?"

Sample Syllabus 

Prague

This course will focus on foreign reporting in US and British newspapers and journals, looking at the history of foreign reporting, the different kinds of media in which it appears, the topics it covers and the skills necessary to perform it. Students will read and discuss contemporary reporting and famous reportage from the past, listen to foreign correspondents and write their own stories. By the end of the course students should have a good understanding of foreign reporting and will be well equipped with some of the practical skills necessary to follow it as a career. 

Syllabus

The course focuses on combining certain techniques of fiction with the rigor of journalistic travel reporting to produce stories that move beyond the constraints of the news and feature story: stories that engage, resonate with readers, provide insight – stories which “produce the emotion”. The course proceeds by the reading and analysis of contemporary journalism and classic travel pieces: careful examination of the narrative; fictional and literary devices used in travel writing; examination of and practice with various information gathering strategies; consideration of the ethics of representation. Students will continually develop stories from their own travel experiences for presentation and in-depth critique in class. These regular assignments will prepare students for their final project: a substantial travel narrative of their own. Participants must meet deadlines set for assignments. Participants may not submit previously published or completed work for the assignments. 

Syllabus

Only open to students who have received special permission.  Email sylvan.solloway@nyu.edu to apply.

The idea of the course is to inform students about European media in general, and about transformation of the Czech media after the Velvet revolution in 1989 in particular. Czech developments will be presented on the background of a wider European perspective in order to make students acquainted with the basic features of European landscape of print and electronic media. Due to the lack of literature and printed sources in English language on the subject, the course will extensively exploit internet sources related to the topics.

Syllabus

Shanghai

This course provides an introduction to the work of the reporter, with particular focus on covering China, and offers students a chance to learn and practice basic journalism skills, including news writing and descriptive/feature writing. Visiting speakers will also offer insights into the role of the journalist and the challenges faced, and provide additional feedback on students’ work and ideas.

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

In this hybrid reading / writing class, we will explore environmental journalism from an Australian perspective. Each week we will read and discuss work that explores this journalistic tradition, its forms and its themes and the place it takes in the new media world. Drawing our inspiration from great writers, we will find our own stories, our own voices and learn to tell our own tales. We will grapple with the debates around environmental advocacy, ethics and objectivity and develop techniques to help us wade through the quicksand of scientific proof and funding agendas. Big local issues in the environmental conversation in Australia include water scarcity and the battle over inland rivers, damage caused by intensive agriculture such as spreading dryland salinity, land clearing, the felling of old-growth forests, combating exotic animals and plants, preserving the Wild, marine conservation and the Reef, protecting our primarily coastal homes from rising sea-levels, our economic reliance on uranium, coal and other mining, urban encroachment into agricultural land and the tension between indigenous rights and environmental aims. As a big coal and uranium miner, Australia also plays an important part in global debates around nuclear issues and ocean and air quality.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

This lecture course will introduce you to issues in journalistic writing and reporting, such as the choices journalists face in method, style, and form; the political impact of the news media; questions of sensationalism, bias, and diversity, and the current digital upheaval.

 

Sample Course Syllabus from NYU New York

This will be a hands-on course examining the role of journalism in society and Washington, DC in particular, examining how people here manipulate facts to fit a world view. It is about truth and truthiness and how to tell the difference. It will be part overview and lecture on topics central to the course and part active reporting and writing. To take advantage of the unique Washington location and distinct attitude in the city, students will participate in press conferences and go to public hearings on Capitol Hill in reporting roles and then write news-style articles. The class will include a focus on the 2014 midterm elections. Invited guest speakers are from NASA, NOAA, environmental activist groups, energy lobbyists and Washington media. The intersection of the media with science, politics and economics on the issue of global warming will be a focal point of this course.

Sample Syllabus

 


Law and Society

Florence

This course provides a thorough introduction to the international system for the protection of human rights and the preconditions under which it functions at international and national levels. The course aims to develop the students' interest in, and knowledge of, international human rights; to explore human rights theory and practice; to introduce various human rights conventions and mechanisms, particularly the United Nations system; and to provide advanced instruction in several key aspects of international human rights, including the effects of globalisation on human rights, the question of the universality / cultural-specificity of human rights, and the so-called 'interdependence' of various human rights.

Sample Syllabus

Prague


This course will begin by reviewing the nature and sources of law. Yet it will do so not as part of a purely academic exercise but in order to answer some very practical philosophical questions, such as: Why isn't law the same thing as justice? Where does legality end and revolution begin? Why does the Anglo-American legal system make legal resolution into a game? Are war crimes tribunals legal proceedings or merely victor's revenge dressed up in procedural garb? Why doesn't law which is considered divinely inspired (i.e. the Old and New Testaments) serve as a legitimate basis of law in the West? The aim of this course is to show how understanding the nature and sources of law can help us understand real-world events and issues. By the end of the course students will have an appreciation of the limits of law and how law fits into the fabric of society alongside other norms, such as morality and religion. Students should also learn to identify interconnections and relationships between ideas in seemingly disparate areas of thought.

Syllabus

Shanghai

This course will study China’s governance in the context of America’s own governance system. We will consider how to compare American and Chinese governance systems, and whether and how concepts can be translated between them—so that the countries, and their citizens can learn from, and cooperate with, one another. In the process, we hope to learn about China, but also to reflect—in the light of 9/11 and Iraq-- more deeply on our own understanding of how American governance works—and how it is seen by the world.

Sample Syllabus


Liberal Studies

Florence

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in literature, music, and the visual and performing arts from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on global developments in culture. The course covers such literary works as; A Grain of Wheat, the poetry of Adrienne Rich, and;Crime and Punishment; films like;The Battle for Algiers; the art of Picasso and Hokusai; and musical works by Stravinsky and Ali Akbar Khan.

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in philosophy, theology, history, and political science from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on major world discourses about the nature of human identity and society through a comparative study of seminal texts. The course includes such works as The Communist Manifesto,The Wretched of the Earth, and Orientalism.

 

Washington, DC

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in literature, music, and the visual and performing arts from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on global developments in culture.

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in philosophy, theology, history, and political science from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on major world discourses about the nature of human identity and society through a comparative study of seminal texts.

 


Mathematics

Florence

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra and Calculus with a grade of C or higher or passing placement exam.

This course is only open to Economics Policy Majors and prospective majors.

This course introduces calculus for real valued functions of a single real variable and of several real variables. In particular, it shows how calculus can be used to solve optimization problems for these functions, including constrained optimization problems which can be solved by substitution. A substantial number of economic examples will be analyzed during the course.

 

 

 

London

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH-UA 121 Calculus I or the equivalent.

Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer's rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH-UA 122/Calculus II and MATH-UA 123/Calculus III or the equivalent.  Not open to students who have taken MATH-UA 235/Probability and Statistics.

An introduction to the mathematical treatment of random phenomena occurring in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Axioms of mathematical probability, combinatorial analysis, binomial distribution, Poisson and normal approximation, random variables and probability distributions, generating functions, Markov chains applications. 

Sample Syllabus


Media, Culture, & Communication

Buenos Aires

This course proposes a historical and cultural approach to the development of the popular press, cinema, radio, television and the contemporary processes of the new media. There is a central question for the course: Is there any singularity in Latin American media? The answer assumes that there is a specific relation between tradition and modernity in Latin American societies with many consequences for mass culture and media. The constitution of mass audiences in societies where literacy was not a universal value, made significant the development of audiovisual media. The course will focus on melodrama as a configuration that made possible the emergence of specific genres in Latin American cinema, radio and television. Particularly, the “telenovela” is simultaneously an aesthetic, industrial and audience phenomenon with local and global circulation. Finally, the course will discuss the role of media in dictatorship and democratic processes. Censorship and alternative media enabled many different practices for radio journalists, filmmakers or contemporary bloggers.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course presents an investigation on the transformations of political communications in period between the so-called Italian "Second Republic", dominated by the larger-than-life and ubiquitous presence of media tycoon and sports entrepreneur Silvio Berlusconi, and the recent emergence
of Internet-based political movement Movimento Cinque Stelle (Five Stars Movement), led by former stand-up comedian and prominent blogger Beppe Grillo. In the course, students will be introduced to the main political and cultural features of this period, spanning two decades, that has witnessed a high level of interpenetration between the political sphere and the media sphere, with a constant interchange of cultural, financial and institutional dynamics. 

Sample Syllabus

London

A review of theories and evidence of cultural and political transformations in culture underway in the era of media proliferation, multinational conglomerates, and cyberspace. The role of international flows and national differences.

Sample Syllabus

Paris

This course introduces students to the basic structures and practices of media in Europe and their relationship to everyday social life. It pays special attention to the common models and idioms of media in Europe, with an emphasis on national and regional variations. Specific case studies highlight current trends in the production, distribution, consumption, and regulation of media. Topics may include: national or regional idioms in a range of media genres, from entertainment, to advertising and publicity, to news and information; legal norms regarding content and freedom of expression; pirate and independent media; and innovations and emerging practices in digital media. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Prague

The course examines the role of advertising not only as an economic force but also as a form of cultural representation with a focus on the social implications of the role of consumerism in contemporary society by following its various forms around the world. Students will read, watch, analyze and discuss a variety of text specific commercials. Attention will be devoted also to the impact of advertising on the post-communist world and to the ways by which cultural issues are framed and kept in mind in the media discourse. The main objective is to provide an introductory course that is meaningful and of practical importance to students. The course examines Advertising not only as an academic discipline, but also a way of perceiving and understanding our society. 

Syllabus

This course will examine “social media” from a cultural perspective, with a focus on how media technologies figure in practices of everyday life and in the construction of social relationships and identities. Although many of our readings will deal with Social Network Sites (SNSs), we will attempt to form an expansive definition of what constitutes “social media.” We will also work from an expansive definition of “technology,” considering the term in a cultural sense to include various practices and tools used to communicate in everyday life.

Syllabus

An introduction to the theoretical approaches and practices used to analyze the content, structure, and context of media in society. Students will explore factors shaping modern media texts, including: politics, economics, technology, and cultural traditions. The dominant critical perspectives that contribute to our understanding of media will be read, discussed, and employed. The course has three broad objectives: Develop a critical awareness of media environments, develop a familiarity with concepts, themes and theoretical approaches of media criticism, and the terms associated with these approaches, and develop an ability to adopt and adapt these frameworks in your own analyses of mediated communication. Students' active class participation is vital to this process. Active participation includes listening, building on what others say, asking questions, advancing reasoned arguments, identifying theories that are relevant to the discussion, and working collaboratively with others. Missing class and/or a record of lateness will negatively affect the final grade. An absence will be excused only in case of a medical emergency (or other extraordinary circumstance) which is justified with appropriate documentation.

Syllabus

Only open to students who have received special departmental permission. Please contact Jonathan Martinez (jm4599@nyu.edu).

NOTE: Students majoring in Journalism and Mass Communication (CAS) or Communication Studies (Steinhardt) may take this course in conjunction with JOUR-UA 9298, Media and Society, for credit in the major.

A veritable buzzword, globalization refers to several newly emerged phenomena. To study it means to delve into several areas in which it manifests itself. These are, to name just the three most visible ones, the economy, culture and politics. In any of these dimensions globalization, as it is discussed in the last twenty years, functions through the media. Media does not portray globalization, but it is its important part. A study of globalization is inherently diverse and eclectic. So is this course. Students will read, watch films, analyze and discuss them. In class discussions and short papers they are expected to engage questions, issues, themes and topics connected to globalization, culture and the media. Special attention will be devoted to the impact of globalization on the late communist and post-communist world, and also to the ways by which the globalization issues are framed and discussed in the media discourse. All assigned texts and films are mandatory. Students are required to follow current events in the media (cable TV, newspapers, Internet). Class participation is expected as it is part of the final grade.

Syllabus

The idea of the course is to inform students about European media in general, and about transformation of the Czech media after the Velvet revolution in 1989 in particular. Czech developments will be presented on the background of a wider European perspective in order to make students acquainted with the basic features of European landscape of print and electronic media. Due to the lack of literature and printed sources in English language on the subject, the course will extensively exploit internet sources related to the topics.

Syllabus

Shanghai

This course introduces the philosophy of cybernetic machines with reference to the technological trends affecting contemporary China. Topics will include: Chinese cyberspace and the Great Fire Wall; the revolutionary potential of microblogs; hacking; gaming; the ICT economy, maker innovations and machine intelligence.

This course is designed to introduce contemporary media industries in China, involving print, broadcasting, film, PR, advertising, and new media. This course reviews the structures, functions, and influences of various forms of media industries. Practical media work is emphasized. Additionally, it analyzes existing issues on these media industries from historical, regulatory, social, and technological perspectives.

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

This course brings together diverse issues and perspectives in rapidly evolving areas of international/global communication. Historical and theoretical frameworks will be provided to help students to approach the scope, disparity and complexity of current developments in our media landscape.

Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Key concepts associated with international communication will be examined, including a focus on trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalisation, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with a particular emphasis on Australia.

Ultimately, we will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a fundamental paradigm shift, as demonstrated by the Arab spring, the Olympics coverage, and the creeping dominance of Google, Facebook and Twitter.

Sample Syllabus


Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Florence

The aim of the course is to follow the evolution of religious ideas and practices throughout the period that goes from early Renaissance to the years of the reorganization of the Catholic Church after the Council of Trent. The geographical area covered will include the countries of southern Europe (mainly Italy, but also Spain, France and Portugal) and the German World. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

The Renaissance began and reached maturity in Italy between 1350 and 1500. This course closely examines the political, economic, and social situations in Italy during this period, emphasizing the special conditions that produced Renaissance art and literature. The relationship between culture, society, and politics is studied in the case of Florence, in which the hegemony of the Medici house and its patronage brought the city to cultural leadership in the Western world. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus


Metropolitan Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Accra

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

Sample Syllabus

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Sample Syllabus

Counter to the prevailing view of a rural African living in traditional communities, the majority of Africans are rapidly becoming urban dwellers. African cities are fast joining the ranks of mega-cities, global market hubs and centers for political and cultural exchange. This phenomenon raises important questions that form the basis for this course. Are these cities merely the products of globalization, or do their roots lie in pre-colonial tradition? Are global cities a new phenomenon in Africa, or can we find traces of earlier international links? What factors define the spatial geography and political economy of urban Africa? What challenges do African governments face in managing the city? How has the architecture and the arts of the African city been influenced by external connections?

This course examines those factors that have shaped Accra throughout history. While the emphasis of the course is on Accra, the course also introduces the main theoretical debates across disciplinary fields in the comparative study of the city. Students will be challenged to utilize primary resources such as national archives and special collection libraries, maps, and various cultural resources to address some of the questions being posed.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

This course examines diverse current urban trends in Berlin and their connections to
worldwide phenomena. It focuses on the way that different social groups (according to
class, milieu, origin, gender or sexuality) appropriate urban space and constitute
place-specific identities.
It uses the city of Berlin with its multiple layers of history as a laboratory for
contemporary urban research with historical, empirical and theoretical material. We will
study key debates on urban developments, partly as field visits, in regard to housing,
migration, gentrification, and we will search for the creative and the sustainable city.
You will be introduced to the contemporary discourses on those trends and to new
ways of reading and seeing a city.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Please visit the NYU Buenos Aires Internships Page for application information. Intermediate Spanish or above is strongly recommended.

This course requires a 90-minute weekly seminar and a minimum of 10 hours fieldwork a week at an approved internship field site. The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Argentine Civil Society. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency. The course provides you with tools to analyze your organization’s approach, its policies, its programs, and the political, legal, social, economic and cultural contexts in which it operates. Guest-speakers are invited to the seminar and case studies on Argentina civil society are discussed.  You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Urban culture is complex, fantastic, frightening, and a part of daily life, encompassing everything from the opera to street musicians, the public library to the piazza, the theater to local cafes and social clubs. This course, where cities are considered to be sources of cultural invention, explores through literature, history, social science and student experience, the evolution of high and popular culture, both modernist and post-modern. Emphasis will be placed on how cultures create bonds between specific interest groups, and how culture becomes the arena for acting out or resolving group conflict. This course will focus on Italian cities, including Florence. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Shanghai

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Application information available here. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite. 

Sample Syllabus

The main aim of this course is to facilitate a rich engagement with Shanghai. The underlying premise is that the city is a critical site of globalization. Rather than view globalization as an external force acting on Shanghai, this course aims instead to show how globalization is inherent in the city and that an investigation of the distinctive features of Shanghai -- from the abandoned factories now revived as creative clusters, to the lilong architecture, luxury malls and street peddlers -- sheds light on both the past and future of globalization.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. We will explore what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. We will consider how to measure sustainability and discuss the effectiveness of sustainability indicators. We will examine governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. We will also highlight the transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future.

Syllabus


Middle Eastern Studies

London

An introductory course dealing with the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the origins of Islam; the beliefs and practices of the Islamic community; differences between Sunni and Shiite Islam; Sufism; the spiritual, intellectual, and artistic life of the Islamic commonwealth; and modern Islamic revival. 

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: Does not count toward the major or minor in Middle Eastern Studies.

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100 with permission of the director.

From the 8th century until the 17th century, Islam played a crucial role in the history of the Iberian Peninsula. Today this period is often portrayed as one of inter-religious harmony, while al-Andalus is simultaneously mourned in contemporary Islamist discourse as a lost paradise. While we look at the history of Al-Andalus and assess the importance of the contributions of Al-Andalus to Europe and America, we evaluate the significance of its legacy in modern Spain. Furthermore, we will study the protagonist role that Spain has played in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic countries during the Modern Age. Students will gain further understanding and contextualization of current Arab-Muslim geopolitics. As a case study, we will address the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, as well as its ensuing process of decolonization and the consequences that shape the current international relations between the two neighboring countries, Spain and Morocco.

Note:  Students MUST acquire a multi-entry visa in order to participate on the trip to Morocco.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

Note: Students planning to continue to Elementary Arabic II are advised to defer Elementary Arabic I until the Fall in New York, followed by Elementary Arabic II in the spring.  Elementary Arabic II is not offered in New York during the fall semester.

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca.

Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Arabic, with increased emphasis on writing and reading from modern sources in addition to aural/oral proficiency. 

 

Professor Ali Al-Azhari
Course description coming soon.

NYU Politics majors can petition to have this course count for elective credit.

More than 30 years have passed since 1979, the year when a self-styled Islamic Revolution unfolded in Iran. Historian Eric J. Hobsbawm branded this revolution as "one of the central social revolutions of the twentieth century"; and social scientist Richard Cottam described it as perhaps "the most popular revolution in the history of mankind." Whatever the case may be, we are now permitted to use the benefit of hindsight to revisit the 1979 revolution. In the first part of the course we will review the manifold causes of the 1979 revolution in a historical perspective, tracing the social, political, economic and cultural bases of the rise of the revolutionary movement and political Islam (or Islamism) in Iran. We will then move on to situate the revolution in a global context. This will enable us to examine Iranian history since 1979 in comparative perspective as well as to integrate the revolution into the "entangled histories" of modernity of which it is part. At the same time we will examine the cultural dimensions of the post-1979 state in Iran. We will consider cultural production in the Islamic Republic of Iran as a site of state domination and oppositional resistance. We will suggest that the Islamic Republic is a "scopic regime," developing a symbolic Islamism as a tool of propaganda and hegemony. At the same time, literature, cinema, and the visual arts have been sites of resistance.

Sample Syllabus


Music (CAS)

Buenos Aires

Both an English and Spanish section of this course will be offered.
For Spanish section: Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU SPAN-UA 100 Advanced Grammar & Composition or equivalent.)

This course is a journey through the different styles of Latin American Folk and Popular Music (LAFM), particularly those coming from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. Their roots, influences and characteristics. Their social and historical context. Their uniqueness and similarities. Emphasis in the rhythmic aspect of folk music as a foundation for dance and as a resource of cultural identity. The irruption of Latin American rhythms in the music market through the World Musicâphenomenon. Even though there is no musical prerequisite, the course is recommended for students with any kind and/or level of musical experience.

Sample Syllabus (English)

Sample Syllabus (Spanish)

Florence

The course covers the evolution of Italian opera from its beginnings in Florence to the early 20th century with special emphasis on Monteverdi, Rossini, Donizetti, Verdi and Puccini. The approach is multidisciplinary and aims at a comprehensive survey of the music theatre in the context of the Italian cultural heritage. Literary sources, musico-dramatic features, vocal styles are studied in connection with major works that best represent trends and genres in the Italian operatic tradition. Students are expected to master the distinctive characteristics of such genres as favola in musica, intermezzo, opera seria, opera buffa, grand opera, dramma lirico, and the basic elements of Italian versification. Students listen to and watch recorded operas and attend performances in Florence or other Italian cities. Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus


Music and Performing Arts (Steinhardt)

Prague

Prerequisite: MPATC-UE 7, Aural Comprehension II, or success in placement exam
Corequisite: MPATC-UE 9037, Music Theory III

Aural Comprehension III is a one-credit course, building on the foundations you have
created in AC I and II. The two weekly class sessions will be devoted to group work in
sight-singing and dictation: melodic, rhythmic and harmonic -- and in listening to longer
segments of work to sharpen your perception of musical form. You will be expected to
keep up a regular practice of these skills outside of class. In addition, we will arrange
tutorials (at least three per semester) for individual work and assessment.

The musical materials of AC III will be taken mostly from 19th-century sources,
reinforcing your work in Music Theory and Music History III. We will also work with
more chromatic music of the 18th century, as well as jazz, popular music and relevant
world cultures.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite:  Music Theory I and Music Theory II, or success in placement exam
Corequisite: MPATC-UE 9008, Aural Comprehension in Music III

In this course students will follow up with their harmony studies. We will go through harmonic instances of advanced chromaticism of the late 19. century and up to the very edge of tonality. Emphasis will be put on assignments and exercises in order to develop good creative and analytical
skills in harmony. Concurrently we will examine the main formal principles of tonal music and apply
our knowledge in analysis of selected compositions. We will use various analytical approaches and
test them on a large scale of historical musical material. Every student will be due to realize at least one analysis of assigned composition during the semester.
 

Sample syllabus

An exploration of 19th Century musical styles, chiefly romanticism, through the works of composers from 1790-1880.
Desired Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to recognize, describe, and discuss features of romantic style.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the origins of romanticism including the
    differences from Classical style as manifest in musical practice.
  • Students will be able to recognize, identify, and discuss works typical of the romantic period
    including symphony, symphonic poem, concerto, opera, lied (song), and solo/chamber works
    including the sonata and string quartet.

Sample syllabus

The basic concepts of 20th and 21st century musical composition - signal processing, extended notation, human computer interaction, studio as instrument, etc. are taught both theoretically and practically. The course is divided into two coordinated weekly classes, the first focusing on theory / listening activities (Rosenzveig), the second, actual composition in the world of electroacoustic music / sound art (Rataj).

In class one students are introduced to different perspectives and aesthetic paradigms for analyzing electroacoustic composition, including the broader contexts of contemporary art and New Media practices and are required to write two short papers. In the second class students compose their own works - the central output of the class.

Prerequisities: Basic knowledge of any software for digital audio practice (Pro Tools, Logic, Cubase, Audacity etc.) with software installed on your own laptop. Facilities:A small production studio is available for students (Pro Tools, Logic, Finale, Max/MSP, small mixer, near-field monitors, microphones, portable digital field recorders)

Note: This is not a 'software class'. Tools are secondary to concepts, history, philosophy and compositional methods.

Sample Syllabus

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll.

One hour per week. (Includes all woodwind, brass and percussion instruments, classical and jazz styles).

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

One hour per week. (Includes traditional, music theatre, film scoring and jazz).

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

One hour per week. (Includes all string orchestral instruments and guitar, classical and jazz styles).

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

One hour per week. (Includes Classical and Jazz styles).

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

One hour per week. (Includes classical, music theatre and jazz styles).

Open to Music majors and other students by placement audition. Non-Steinhardt music majors should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll.

Open to Music majors and other students by placement audition. Non-Steinhardt music majors should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

 

For NYU Steinhardt Music Business students only; permission of Steinhardt music faculty required. Contact Catherine Moore catherine.moore@nyu.edu.

For NYU Steinhardt Music Technology students only; permission of Steinhardt music faculty required. Contact Kenneth Peacock kp3@nyu.edu for permission to enroll.


Nutrition

Accra

The course is designed to enhance students’ awarenessof the multifaceted nature of nutrition problems across the globe and the needfor holistic approaches to methods to address them including research. Thecourse will review the UNICEF malnutrition structure within the context oflivelihood frameworks to demonstrate the linkages between health, nutrition andagriculture. Food security issues and impacts on nutrition and developmentalissues will be discussed. The course will also discuss the trends ofglobalization and the nutritional implications. The fact that the intensity andeffects of globalization are experienced differently across different nations,social classes, cultures, and genders will be stressed. The course will furtherreview key concepts and debates regarding nutrition transition, infant andyoung child feeding, women, aging and health.  

Sample Syllabus

 


Philosophy

London

This is an introduction to some central questions, perplexities and concepts within the main areas of philosophy, introducing themes from metaphysics, epistemology and ethics. Some extracts from some classic texts will be engaged – Plato, Descartes and John Stuart Mill, for example – and contemporary approaches will be addressed. Questions include: What am I? Is free will an illusion? What is knowledge? Is belief in God rational? and Whom ought I to save? In discussing these questions, important distinctions will be introduced and there will be attention to rigorous argument, including the nature of deductively sound argument.

The classes will involve informal instruction and discussion, with a focus upon clarity and argument over a range of topics, though also, it is hoped, with a lightness of touch.

Sample Syllabus

Examines fundamental questions of moral philosophy. What are our most basic values and which of them are specifically moral values? What are the ethical principles, if any, by which we should judge our actions, ourselves, and our lives?

Sample Syllabus

Paris

An introduction to philosophy through the study of issues in cognitive science. Topics may include the conflict between computational and biological approaches to the mind; whether a machine could think; the reduction of the mind to the brain; connectionism and neural nets. Gives training in philosophical argument and writing.

 


Photography

Additional photography courses listed under Art and Art Professions

Florence

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice, covering the theoretical connections between architecture and photography. Through course assignments students will learn to confront a variety of challenges presented by photographing different architectural styles. By the end of the course, each student will have produced a portfolio of architectural photography.

This is an intermediate photography course. Each student must have basic knowledge of digital photographic techniques and their own digital camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed. The course is a combination of lectures and labs for a total of six hours per week.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Photo I or equivalent. An analog or a digital camera with manual settings is required. Students registering for this course must also register for Directed Projects Lab  (0 points).

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

Florence can be considered the historic capital of optics: as the leading center for the production of lenses and spectacles in the Renaissance, it was also a center for extraordinary experimentation regarding the science of vision.  The experiments and writings of such masters as Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Giovan Battista della Porta and Galileo, among others, are testimony to the extraordinary contributions made here to the understanding of sight and to the development of devices that aided, altered or controlled vision for artistic purpose.

This course proposes to contextualize historic photographic techniques within this rich context of the history of optics.  An invaluable resource for this exploration will be the Acton Photograph Archive at Villa La Pietra with its rich collection of stereographs, daguerrotypes, ambrotypes, silver prints and albumen prints.  Students will thus be able to learn about these historic techniques by examining firsthand surviving, in some cases extremely rare, examples of them.

Following the inspiration of these historic techniques, from the experiments of the Florentine Renaissance artists to those of the Alinari Brothers, a firm founded in Florence in the nineteenth century and renowned throughout the world as an early innovator in the uses and techniques of photography, students will have the opportunity to explore these techniques themselves hands on.  They will be encouraged to develop their individual expression through their own projects employing one or more of these historic photographic techniques.  This inspiring course on experimental photography explores new possibilities of imagemaking by combining pinhole and toy cameras and other alternative techniques with a theoretical approach to representation.

Sample Syllabus

 A digital SLR camera is required.

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Students should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

The course Photojournalism: Exploring Italian Society focuses on the contemporary life of Florence, a city best known as a UNESCO World Heritage site, but that is also a European city attempting to rise to the challenges that currently confront other urban environments throughout Europe and the world. The course draws its strengths from the unique resources of the program and the city of Florence. From Italian labor protests, to commemoration of historic events, to immigrant populations, mass transit and tourism, Florence has many compelling contemporary visual stories to tell. Students have the unique opportunity to capture these issues in images.

Sample Syllabus


Physics

London

Students registering for this course must also register for Lecture, Laboratory, & Recitation. Students should note that the Physics lab takes place at King's College in Waterloo. This is roughly a 30 minute bus journey from the academic centre.

This course begins a two-semester introduction to physics (lecture and laboratory-recitation) intended primarily for preprofessional students and for those majoring in a science other than physics. Topics include kinematics and dynamics of particles; momentum, work, and energy; gravitation; circular, angular, and harmonic motion; mechanical and thermal properties of solids, liquids, and gases; heat and thermodynamics. 

Sample Lecture Syllabus

Sample Lab Syllabus


Politics

Berlin

This course provides a survey of the intellectual traditions from classic to modern
political thought in the West. Our exploration of political theory will proceed from a
close reading and analysis of seminal texts that are presented both conceptually and,
for the most part, chronologically. The primary focus will be placed on examining the
historical antecedents of some of the foundational concepts and practices that
distinguish our political behavior and institutions today. While taking account of the
historical complexities and stylized conventions of each text, the course will highlight
the recurrent themes that animate these influential writings and continue to shape our
contemporary understanding of politics. In particular, the lectures and discussions will
be geared towards tracing the conceptual underpinnings of current forms of political
organization, such as the nation-state and liberal democracy, and their effects on the
concerns of law, justice and morality. Some of the critical issues to be discussed
include the divergent views of human nature and ideal society, the structure of
authority and sovereignty, states of emergency, the defense of liberty, equality and
justice, and the different models of democratic practice.

Sample Syllabus 

Students may not register for both this course and Berlin's History & Culture due to content overlap.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the major
events and principal problems in German history in the twentieth century. Through
lectures, readings, and discussions the weekly classes will familiarize students with
the conceptual narratives and methodological interpretations of twentieth century
German history. Germany´s path to nation-building in 1871, the challenges of
modernization in Imperial Germany, Weimar´s struggle between liberal-democratic
and conservative-authoritarian forces, Germany´s politics in the two world wars in
1914/18 and 1939/45, and the construction of two Germanys after 1945 will be
contextualized within broader frameworks of European development. Political, social,
and cultural turning points will be discussed alongside key events in European
history, such as diplomatic conflict prior to 1914, the crisis of democracy in Interwar-
Europe, the rise of Fascism, the Second World War, the Cold War, the protest
movements of 1968, Eastern European Dissident Movements and the final collapse
of communism in 1989, as well as the current challenges in European politics.

Sample Syllabus

This course aims to provide an overview of the history, structure, functions, processes
and current issues of European integration with a particular emphasis on the role of
Germany both as to its influence on the EU and the Europeanisation of its own political
system.
European Integration is understood in this course to mean the co-operation, which EU
Member states organize in the framework of the Union, and the direction in which this
co-operation evolves. For these twenty-eight diverse countries, integration constitutes
an increasingly essential component and extension of their own state structure. It
permits them to conceive of, to decide on, and to carry out a growing number of
important state tasks in common, and under the roof of the European Union.
You will consider the milestones of postwar European integration. You will analyze the
institutions, procedures and instruments of European integration as well as major EU
policies and the distribution of competencies between Member States and Union. And
you will get acquainted with theoretical models to explain the nature of European
integration up to the present.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

The aim is for the student to have a full understanding of Latin America's insertion in the global structure of international relations. Covering in parallel the evolution of the international system and the changing position of the region in that same system, the course attempts to reinterpret the frameworks of analysis as perceived from the Western Hemisphere. The student will be provided with a Latin American view of the main economic developments and political processes that have given shape to each stage in time- to the structure and dynamics of the international system. The ultimate goal is to make students aware that where you stand depends on where you sit by exposing them to alternate views on concepts they are already familiar with.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course explores the role of the US in Europe from the end of World War II to the present with a particular emphasis on understanding the sources of cooperation and conflict. The topics covered in the first part will include the US vision of the new international order, the end of the old European balance of power, the Cold War and the division of Europe, the building of the Western alliance, the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. The second part of the course will concentrate on contemporary issues ranging from the evolution of NATO to trade relations and the role of the dollar and the euro in the international monetary system. Particular attention will also be given to the challenges posed by the ‘war on terror’, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

In our society the need for deep understanding of what is going on translates into a need to keep track what has happened, how to outline trends, plan the future knowing the present or the past. We have all heard about demographic pressure, social policies, health care planning, inflation, market volatility: these are all concepts which rely heavily on statistical information. Changes have to be managed properly and in an informed way: scientific experiments be they on a medicine, on fertilizer or airbags must be planned as to ensure their validity. Total quality in production is a statistics-based philosophy of management, and if you like a commercial it is also because a statistician has provided information about consumer tastes and behaviour. In this course we will provide an introduction to the tools of statistics but most importantly we will try and understand the rationale behind statistics.

Sample Syllabus

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

Presents a study of post-World War II Italian politics and society in comparative and historical perspective. Seeks explanations of Italian political development in specific historical factors such as the 19th century patterns of state formation and the experience of fascism. Comparative analysis seeks to show how the social structure, political culture, and party systems have shaped Italy's distinct development. Current and recurrent political issues include the problem of integrating the south into the national economy and state response to social movements, particularly terrorism. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

The European Union is a unique and strange entity.  It has 27 states and 500 million people. Its GNP is more or less equal to that of the USA. Many of its members share a common currency and a common monetary policy.  Yet it is a union without a state. The spectacular progress in the area of economic integration has not been matched by the creation of a common government and a common identity.  The economic giant is still a political dwarf as it has been confirmed time and again whenever there is an international crisis,. Yet so far this strange entity has been working. Its achievements in the economic arena have been remarkable. The course will analyze in an interdisciplinary fashion the making of the Union, its institutions, its policies and its prospects in the very challenging environment of today.  Probably more so than in any other period in its history the survival of the Union, as we have known it, will be tested by the impact of the most serious crisis of the post-war period.  Particular attention will be given to the new economic governance established by the Union in responding to the problems posed by the poor economic and financial performance of some of its members, i.e. the PIGS (Portugal, Ireland, Greece, Spain). Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course will introduce students to the study of comparative politics, which is defined as the study of domestic politics anywhere in the world.  As a way of cutting into this vast topic, we specifically focus on the process of democratic transition by analyzing the democratic revolution that has swept the globe during the last thirty-five years. In turn we will explore the causes of democratization, threats to democratization, and factors that may aid in a successful consolidation of democracy. As part of this process, students will be exposed to a wide range of topics in comparative politics, including theories of democratic transitions, the politics of economic reform, voting, parties, and electoral systems, and theories of ethnic conflict.

Please note: this course fulfills the requirement for a “core” course for Politics majors, the first time such a course has been offered at NYU-Florence, and is taught by Professor Tucker, who normally teaches the course in New York. As such, it is to date the only opportunity *anywhere* to take a politics core course in a small class format.  As an introductory course, it is also perfectly appropriate for non-politics majors as well.

Sample Syllabus

 

London

Introduction to the politics and society of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Traces the political and social development of the historic countries of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales; the growth of British hegemony and imperialism; the politics of decline and decay; and the promise of rebirth. Studies contemporary political institutions and processes that have undergone massive transformation over the past 50 years. Examines the continuing conflict and terrorism in Northern Ireland and dynamics of change in the Thatcher era and beyond.

Sample Syllabus

Introduction to the politics of Eastern and Central European countries. Considers political, social, and economic developments in these countries during the post-Versailles period. Subjects include the communist takeover at the end of World War II, uprising during the de-Stalinization era, and the collapse of communism at the end of the 1980s. Also deals with contemporary issues, including the process of democratization. 

Sample Syllabus

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Sample Syllabus

This course critically investigates European integration, the operation of the EU as a political system and European policies. The course explores the origins, development, institutions, major policies, policy-making, current problems and matters of controversy of the European Community / Union. The major approaches applied to explain integration as well as the complex operation of the EU as a political system are described and discussed. The political and economic logic behind different national perspectives on European integration are examined.

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: This course does not count towards the major or minor in International Relations.

Characteristics and conditions of war and peace and the transition from one to the other from the perspective of political and social science. Examines the role and use of coercion in global affairs, with emphasis on attempts to substitute negotiation, bargaining, market forces, politics, and law for the resort to massive violence in moderating disputes. Considers recent developments in both the theory and practice of peacebuilding demonstrating the differing ways in which particular conflicts tend to be viewed by participants, external commentators and policy-makers.  Students will also undertake their own research on a case study of conflict.

The course will be taught in the form of an informal lecture and a class discussion, and students will present preliminary versions of their case studies to the class. A visiting speaker from an organisation dealing with issues of violent conflict and peace will also participate in one of the sessions (to be arranged).

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100 with permission of the director.

A study of Spain and its integration into the European Common Market. The historical background examines Europe in the aftermath of World War II, Spain under Franco's dictatorship and its relationship to other European countries, as well as the events leading up to the actual foundation of the European Economic Community (EEC). Emphasis is on the negotiations leading to Spain's incorporation into the EEC, and a detailed analysis is given of the present-day European Common Market and its goals for the future.

Sample Syllabus 

This course examines the interaction between two coupled systems, the Earth system and humanity’s political systems. Beginning with an analysis of the effects of anthropogenic industrial carbon dioxide gas emissions on the Earth system as derived from the scientific evidence this course attempts to understand the reaction of the global, European and Spanish political governance systems to these transformations. In order to understand something as apparently specific as the impact of climate change in the Iberian peninsula and the Spanish state’s response to it we must first understand, therefore, how the United Nations and the European Union are responding to climate change since the Spanish political system’s control and mitigation policies are largely determined by these two larger governance systems’ responses.

Sample Syllabus 

Millions of lives around the world are impacted by natural disaster, war and other crises every year. Men, women and children are left homeless and vulnerable, and domestic infrastructure and institutions are often completely destroyed. Frequently, the people affected tend to live in countries that lack the autonomous capacities to pursue development without the assistance of international development agencies, foreign governments and NGOs. The development of a country requires a multi-layered approach, taking into account the diversity of failures caused by the crisis, the particularities of country related issues and, in most cases, the lack of development that already existed in the period preceding the crisis.International Development in Post Crisis Countries explores how countries develop in post-crisis periods and looks at the role of the international community in contributing to development. This course introduces students to a cross section of academic topics relevant to development, including, but not limited to, economic development, international relations, law and rule of law, human rights and gender studies. The majority of the course will focus on exploring each of these topic areas in depth, examining them from a wide array of theoretical perspectives and methodologies.

Sample Syllabus

Paris

The purpose of this seminar on European integration is to give the students a few keys in understanding what the European Union is and how it works; how it affects every day policies of the member states as well as the life of European citizens; what kind of world actor the EU is or might become; what political consequences the current financial crisis might have for the EU. Conducted in French.

This course investigates the history, the structure and the inner logic and working of European integration from the end of the Second World War to present day. It will provide students with an overview of the political institutions, the member states and the current developments of the European Union while focusing on the paramount role played by France throughout the years. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

Prof. L. Rovna

This course will concentrate on the analysis of the pursuits of democracy in Western Europe. Firstly, the conception of Europe will be explored in its historical perspective and different perceptions: territorial, political, spiritual, cultural etc. Secondly, the characterizing social cleavages of Europe will be introduced: territorial, economic, religious, national, ethnic etc. Furthermore, we will discuss how these cleavages get expressed in the formation of different social interests and lead to the organization of interests groups, political parties and NGOs. Thirdly, turning towards the institutional structures of West European parliamentary democracies, we will address the existence of political party systems, as well as the executive and legislative powers represented by government and parliament. Fourthly, we will explore the rules and outcomes of different electoral systems, which ensure regular rotation of political elites at power – however, under different principles. Finally, we will assess the enrichment of the classical models of government in Western Europe, which have in the last 20 years been supplemented by additional players participating in the decision making processes on different levels (local, regional, national and European) – leading to new political conceptualization of ‘governance’. Also, while European states remain core units of European integration, they are also influenced by the EU, leading to their Europeanization. The new challenges facing Western Europe, such as globalization, continuing European integration, regionalization, restructuring of social welfare systems and the issues of identity, will be discussed. 

Syllabus

This course will focus on the history of the culturally rich region of "Mitteleuropa" through analysis of the parallel evolution of Germany and the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary. Mitteleuropa as a region produced such important figures as Franz Kafka, Gustav Mahler, Sigmund Freud, Theodor Herzl and Milan Kundera; historical personalities whose influence internationally is indisputable. We'll delve into the history of the region and on the central role played by German politics and culture from the end of the 19th century, through the turbulent 20th century to the present day.

Emphasis will be on the evolution of the concept of nationalism as well as on Germany's foreign policy in the "concert of nations", especially towards its Eastern neighbors. The aim is to achieve an understanding of the complex evolution of national entities and their interaction between the birth of the modern German state and the integration of the Visegrád countries in NATO and the European Union.

Syllabus

This course explores the recent history and the current state of political, economic and cultural relations between the United States and Europe. Ever since the end of the World War II, the cooperative relationship between these two parts of the world, often described as "The West", has been a bedrock of international stability, security and prosperity. After the end of the Cold War, this relationship has undergone changes, along with the whole system of international relations. Recently, on both sides of the Atlantic, the talk has been about a crisis of the Euro-American relationship. We will examine the validity of these claims, the causes of the current disagreements and possible ways of overcoming them. Throughout, we will emphasize the overwhelming nature of common values and interests on both sides of the Atlantic as well as the risks stemming from a potential rift for both Europe and America. We will examine the compatibility of current European and U.S. policies with respect to third countries or regions, such as Russia, the Middle East, China, and other parts of the Globe. We will also analyze the specific role played in this relationship by countries of Central and Eastern Europe as relative newcomers to democracy, to the Atlantic Alliance and to European Union.

Syllabus

This course is an introduction to the modern politics and government of Central and Eastern Europe from the beginning of the Twentieth Century to the present. We will examine several periods, including 1). The interwar period and the development of the first modern political systems; 2) World War II, German occupation and resistance, and official and unofficial political systems; 3). Sovietization and the adoption of non-democratic political system; 4). The Communist Era in Eastern & Central Europe; 5). Democratic transitions; 6) and the processes of democratic consolidation. The course uses a comparative approach, using a few basic theories of political science to analyze the Central & Eastern European case. Topics include types of political regimes, creation and breakdown of democratic systems, constitutions and state systems, political parties, elections etc.

Syllabus

The course "Central Europe, EU and NATO" provides students with an overview of the history, institutional and political structures, and major current debates in the European integration process, including its Atlantic dimension. In particular, the course concentrates on the trends triggered by EU enlargements in 2004 and 2007, the security situation after 9/11 and the impact of globalization on EU economic and social governance.

Syllabus

This course tells the story of the region in the geographical trap between Germany and Russia. The establishment of Czechoslovakia, the post-WW II expulsion of the German minority, Stalinism, the Prague Spring of 1968, dissident movements, the Velvet Revolution of 1989, transition to democracy, Václav Havel and the post-Havel era will all be studied. Students will gain basic knowledge on Central European political, historical and economic issues. Critical reading of sources and independent thinking required.

Syllabus

Shanghai

This course has been cancelled for the fall 2014 semester

This course combines two parts: (1) introduction to theories of international politics and, (2) their applications to the understanding of US-China relations. The first part examines competing approaches to international politics, explains their basic concepts and rationales, and evaluates their explanatory insights. The principal objective of this part is for students to develop an appreciation of the ways in which various theoretical perspectives lead to different understandings of the structures and practices of world politics. The second part offers students an advanced understanding of US-China relations, focusing on the post-Cold War period, with a special emphasis on issues of security, human rights and economy. This part is intended to provide the means for students to develop their own theoretically informed analyses of major issues in US-China relations, such us how China’s membership in the WTO affects American economy, including the quality of employment opportunities in the United States.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

International negotiation has become the most widely used means of conflict management in international affairs.  Negotiations of international significance are today conducted not only between individual states, but also within and beyond them. At the same time negotiation practice itself is undergoing much change with changing patterns of conflict and intervention, new urgent issues on the global agenda, new actors and new emerging norms.

This course provides an overview of negotiation and conflict resolution theories and practices of international importance – bilateral, regional and multilateral. The emphasis is on different approaches/aspects to understanding what drives the negotiation process and explains the outcome. Why do some negotiations succeed, while others keep failing? Why do some peace settlements succeed while others fail?  We will examine not only the official negotiation process but also the important functions of pre-negotiation, second-track diplomacy and post-agreement negotiations concerned with implementation and compliance. 

While we will give many examples from various civil and international conflicts, our main focus will be on two regional conflicts – Cyprus and the Arab-Israeli conflict.  There will also be guest lectures by some of those who were involved in peace negotiations in the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Sample Syllabus

The purpose of this course is to examine the relation between religion and public life in both western and non western societies. Recently, the question of the relation between religion and public life has come to the fore again, for several reasons. First, the Third Wave of Democratization in certain Catholic, Orthodox and non-Christian societies has raised the question of the relation between religion and democratic political culture. Second, the immigration of non-Christians to certain western, ”Christian“ nations has tended to underline the Christian foundations of those national states. And third, the resurgence of religious fundamentalism in many parts of the world has sharpened the question of the relation between religion and public life in still other societies. All of these developments cast doubt on traditional theoretical formulations about both the privatization of religion and the secularization of the state. It seems that religion plays an important role in the formation of regimes and political patterns; that religious establishments and religious communities are occasionally involved in political struggles; and that religions introduce powerful symbols of identification that often mobilize the public for political purposes.

Sample Syllabus 

Washington, DC

While not required at NYU Washington, DC, we strongly recommend that students take  POL-UA 300 - Power and Politics in America prior to enrolling in this course.

This class will examine the origins of public opinion research, the impact it has on news coverage, political campaigns, public discourse, elected officials, and in many cases, public policy outcomes. You will learn how to read, analyze, and critically-evaluate public opinion research; you will learn about “leading” and “trailing” research indicators; and you will learn why “character” attributes often matter more than “performance” attributes and issue position. You will see how political campaigns, lobbyists, public relations professionals and others leverage public opinion to impact perceptions and political, policy and business outcomes. And because this course is being taught in the nation’s capital, where politics and policy converge--and against the backdrop of a close and hard-fought presidential campaign—we will also hear from political professionals from both political parties, congressional staffers, and journalists, who will share their insights about how they apply public opinion research to conduct campaigns, shape policy, report the news, or address business challenges.

There is an existing and established core reading list for this course, which we will use as the foundational reading for the course. Each week’s lecture topic will cover the assigned reading topics and apply them to real-life examples, so that they can be more easily and clearly understood. Young people often tell me how much they enjoy politics, and sometimes ask whether it’s possible for them to make a career doing politics, and what is the best way to make it happen. If you are one of those young people, this course is designed to help show you how to do it.

Classes will begin with a discussion of the reading assignment, and how it might apply to a specific aspect of public opinion research. Following the discussion on the core materials, we will analyze and discuss a political or issue poll (including tracking and other polling from the previous week, since this is the campaign season and there will be many public opinion research instruments released during the semester), and/or a guest lecturer, who could be a public opinion researcher, a campaign operative, a congressional or committee staffer, or a member of the national news media who covers campaigns.

Sample Syllabus

Only NYU Stern BPE students may register for this course under the BPEP-UB 9044 number. All other students should register under POL-UA 9530. For Non-BPE Stern this course does not count for Stern credit, though Stern students are welcome to take this course as an elective.

This class introduces students to the evolution of politics and economic policy in Latin America after WWII, with a focus on the post-debt crisis period. Students will become familiar with key political and economic concepts and theories regarding the evolution of policies in Latin America. During the first half of the class, we will explore key themes in post-debt crisis Latin America, focusing on the theme of “the rise and frustration of the Latin American middle class.” In the second part of the class, we will utilize those tools and explore these and additional themes through specific country cases).
Students will choose one main country to follow throughout the class, and will prepare a final paper assessing that country’s main political and economic challenges. Students will become familiar with major economic data sets, which they will use in their research, and will learn the basics of economic writing.

Syllabus

This survey course will focus on the historical development of U.S. federal authority and capacity over public lands and resources, including the germination and expansion of the idea of a coherent public interest with respect to air, water, forests, landscapes, and other environmental attributes. The course will address U.S. environmental policy through several lenses, including (1) a set of two introductory sessions in which students are introduced to key terminology, concepts, and orientations toward the domain of environmental policy; (2) a core series of fourteen sessions through which we survey how historical precedents have shaped contemporary U.S. environmental policies and programs; and (3) a concluding set of three sessions through which we review several unfolding environmental policy topics (e.g., climate change, invasive species, or hydraulic fracturing).