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Courses - Fall 2013

 

NYU's Global Academic Centers offer a wide variety of course offerings from undergraduate departments across the university.  The list below organizes all of the Global course offerings by their sponsoring department.  Use the dropdown menu below or the links to the right to view a specific department.  Course offerings organized by location can be found on the course offerings page for each Global Academic Center.

Students: Keep in mind that departments sometimes give major, minor, or university core credit for courses outside the department.  Always consult your academic advisor when planning your time away. 

Please note: Since the deparmental structure at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai does not align with the academic departments at NYU New York, courses sponsored by departments at these campuses are not listed here. NYU Abu Dhabi courses can be found here. NYU Shanghai courses sponsored by departments from NYU New York are listed below. In addition, a select group of courses from NYU Shanghai departments are open to Study Away students. These courses are included on the NYU Shanghai course listing webpage here but not on the list below.

Fall 2013 courses are now availble in Albert, NYU's Student Information System. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.

For questions regarding the course offerings below, please contact global.academics@nyu.edu

Fall 2013 | Spring 2014


Africana Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Accra

The course covers 200 years of African and Ghanaian popular music and examines parallels and actual links between the music of Africa and that of the Americas such as jazz, the blues, calypsos, Latin music, reggae, rock, soul, salsa and right up to today’s hip-hop, ragga and ‘world music’ The course also examines how African popular music uses traditional performance resources, how it played a an active role in the African independence and anti-apartheid struggle and how music relates to urbanization, social protest, generational identity and changing gender roles.

   Sample Syllabus

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Sample Syllabus

This is an interdisciplinary course designed to study the life and times, intellectual thought and practical activity, of Ghana’s first president, Kwame Nkrumah.  With the use of a variety of readings and audio-visual materials, this course will critically explore the socioeconomic and political factors that served to shape the life, thought, and times of Kwame Nkrumah.  The persons, ideas, and events that influenced Nkrumah and the ideas, persons and events that he also impacted will be covered as well.  Students interested in sociology, history, political science, economics, and cultural studies will find this course of particular interest as its subject matter will dovetail into each of these related fields of study.

Sample Syllabus

The course introduces students to aspects of Ghanaian society and culture. It considers both traditional aspects of life and how people live their lives in this first decade of the new millennium. How Ghanaians perceive and conceive themselves and their society; how others view the society and life of Ghanaians also receive critical attention. The course emphasizes that Ghanaians are not an undifferentiated lot and that what the different people say their behavior should be differs from what their actual behavior is. Students will get to examine these varied perceptions and perspectives as well as construct their own representations of the society. The course will also attempt to answer questions about Ghana and Ghanaians that are of interest to the non-Ghanaian getting acquainted with the country. The course combines talks, readings, discussions, visits, and students' presentations in class. There will be a written examination at the end of the semester and a dissertation on an aspect of Ghanaian society and culture that students might choose to explore.

Sample Syllabus

Note: this course is open to all students for elective credit. Comparative
literature majors in track ii (literary and cultural studies) may count this
course toward one of their non-core major requirements.

The course examines certain recurring themes and critical issues in post-colonial narratives in Africa. It begins with a look at the debate and polemics around post-colonialism as a critical and theoretical concept. It then dwells on specific narratives, mainly novels by African writers, works located in the period following classical colonialism. The reading of these narratives is informed by such critical issues as the crisis of cultures in contact; personal, class, ethnic and national identities; the politics of gender; debates over language; the aesthetics and politics of art; strategic transformations in narrative form, etc.

Sample Syllabus

Introduces the language behavior of African Americans. Discusses African American Vernacular English in terms of its linguistic and cultural distinctiveness, both intrasystemically and in comparison with other dialects of American English. Relates the English vernacular spoken by African Americans in urban settings to creole languages spoken on the South Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in West Africa. Also approaches the subject from the perspective of the history of the expressive uses of African American Vernacular English, and the educational, attitudinal, and social implications connected with the language.

Please note: This course satisfies the MAP Societies and the Social Sciences requirement.

Considers contemporary issues in the interaction of language and society, particularly work on speech variation and social structure. Focuses on ways in which social factors affect language. Topics include language as a social and political entity; regional, social, and ethnic speech varieties; bilingualism; and pidgin and creole languages.

 

This is a language course designed to provide basic communicative competence in oral and written Twi for beginners. It focuses on the structure of the language as well as the culture of the people. The areas covered include: (i) oral drills; (ii) orthography; (iii) written exercises; (iv)translation from English to Twi and from Twi to English; (v) reading and comprehension; (vi) conversation and narration involving dialogues, greetings, description of day to day activities and bargaining); (vii) Grammar (parts of speech—nouns, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, particles, determiners, tense/aspect, and question forms); (viii) Composition writing.

Sample Syllabus

London

This course negotiates the complex range of influences that construct black culture and identity in Britain today from socio-cultural, historical, geo-political and aesthetic standpoints. The changing conceptions of Black British identity (and its detractors), is explored in a cross-disciplinary curriculum which attempts to straddle the perhaps irresolvable division between the recognition of cultural differences and the refusal of marginalization, as played out in the urban context, namely London. Key areas of investigation include: representation via literature, drama, film, television, music, sport and the visual arts and the ways in which these areas are shaped by and shape black citizens’ experiences of society’s institutions through the media, education, criminal justice system and the arts. As an indicative rather than definitive hold-all, or framing device, the use of the term ‘Black British’ follows the Parekh Report’s lead, that ‘belonging is about full acceptance, being recognized as an integral part of the community’ (2000:54). The course assumes automatic cultural constituency for indigenous black Britons as they belong to and contribute distinctively to contemporary society. It moves beyond centring inheritance in terms of the immigrant or arrivalist sensibility in order to explore Britain’s unique manifestation of the African diaspora as sited firmly within contemporary Europe. The breadth of the course aims to: introduce students to cultural criticism and theory, apply this to Black Urban Studies in the British context and encourage research into a wider range of questions that will arise from investigating the above.

Sample Syllabus

This course provides students with knowledge of the diverse literatures composed and written in indigenous languages of Africa, as well as of the general issues relevant to the study of this literature. The languages covered include Swahili (East Africa), Hausa and Yoruba (Nigeria and West Africa), Xhosa (Southern Africa), and Somali (Horn of Africa). The literature is discussed largely according to major genre types, such as poetry and song, oral narratives, and written prose literature. No knowledge of these languages is required for the course. 

The course familiarizes students with a selection of the varying perspectives from which African experience has been perceived, analyzed, and interpreted, primarily by Africans and persons of African descent, both on the continent and in the diaspora. 

An introduction to thinking about the human faculty of language within a specifically African context. The course focuses on issues of language within the framework of human society at all levels, and not so much on language as a structural entity. Topics include the general characteristics of human language; the description of the languages of Africa; the question of language and cultural contact in Africa; and the contemporary issues of language and sociopolitics in Africa. 

The course examines not only the common concerns but also the diverse traditions, as a result of historical, social, and cultural imperatives, that have informed the literature produced by African writers. Topics include colonialism; the question of language; race and identity; nationalism and literature; modernity; exile; and the politics of gender in the African context. 

The aim of the course is to introduce students to cultural dimensions in Africa, and to ways of approaching the study of culture in Africa. It focuses on three overall themes: orality, performance and identity, exploring ways in which these find expression primarily (though not exclusively) through language, religious belief, music, literature, nationalism, and popular culture. After presenting a general theoretical framework for the study of the themes, it concentrates on specific cultural contexts, illustrated with "case studies". Students are also encouraged to do further reading within other culture areas of Africa and the African Diaspora. 

Paris

A historical and political inquiry into the French system of relations with Francophone Africa from the ‘race to Empire’ in the 19th century to the current day. The main goals of the course are: to describe the historical development of French-African relations from the colonial to the post-independence era; to investigate the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of French influence in contemporary Francophone Africa; to understand the consequences for France of complex developments subsequent to colonialism, such as African immigration in France. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus


Anthropology

Accra

The course introduces students to aspects of Ghanaian society and culture. It considers both traditional aspects of life and how people live their lives in this first decade of the new millennium. How Ghanaians perceive and conceive themselves and their society; how others view the society and life of Ghanaians also receive critical attention. The course emphasizes that Ghanaians are not an undifferentiated lot and that what the different people say their behavior should be differs from what their actual behavior is. Students will get to examine these varied perceptions and perspectives as well as construct their own representations of the society. The course will also attempt to answer questions about Ghana and Ghanaians that are of interest to the non-Ghanaian getting acquainted with the country. The course combines talks, readings, discussions, visits, and students' presentations in class. There will be a written examination at the end of the semester and a dissertation on an aspect of Ghanaian society and culture that students might choose to explore.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

The current anti-Western turn in the Russian politics and the much-publicized violent Russian reaction to the European aspirations of Ukraine provides a useful context for exploration of the profound diversity of the Eastern half of the European continent which until recently has been often perceived in the West as a monolith called "Eastern Europe". This course aims at helping students to understand the distinctiveness and uniqueness of Russia's cultural, social and political traditions vis-à-vis not only Western Europe, but also vis-à-vis the countries of East-Central Europe which until recently constituted a part of the Soviet sphere of influence locked behind the Iron Curtain. By attending to the complexities of the dynamics of the centuries-long interaction between the "Russian civilization" (Russkiy mir) and the diverse nations and cultures of East-Central Europe students will be encouraged to appreciate the social, political and economic significance of seemingly subtle differences between the historical experiences, identity narratives, and value systems of various peoples, who tend to retain their particular cultural patterns of thought and social behavior despite geographical proximity and growing interconnectedness brought about by globalization. While the course is primarily addressed to students of Russian and Slavic Studies, of European history, and of European politics, its focus on the explanatory power of particular cultural outlooks of peoples and nations which provide the context for individual and group decision-making makes this course suitable also for students of other social and cultural sciences. Without adequate understanding and appreciation of both commonality and diversity of human experience we are risking profound misreading of the intentions and expectations of the others, and this in turn is likely to lead to mismanagement of international affairs despite our best intentions to make our globalizing world livable and hospitable to all. 

The course will introduce students to the development of Romany politics and culture from a persecuted minority through to the emergence of Romany organizations with an emphasis on Central and Eastern Europe. The aim is to challenge any essentializing view on Roma as either a people outside or/and without society or as perennial victims of oppression. Two main approaches have dominated the teaching of Romany issues: a culturalist/ethnic approach, which stresses Romany cultures, and an economistic approach, which stresses ´poverty.´ This course will challenge mono-causal and a-historic explanations for the social situation of Roma and will stimulate students to think about Roma in a critical holistic way that brings into consideration the societies they live in. Building on a diverse selection of empirical material, ranging from ethnographic, historical and sociological case studies to artistic representations of Roma, the course will present the Roma “as good to think” for our comprehension of current social issues. The course is divided into three interconnected thematic blocks – 1. Identity, community and culture, 2. Power, the State and social stratification, 3. History, memory and politics of representation – which will allow to cover much of the current debates on the plight of European Roma as well as a grasp of social theories on marginality.

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

This course offers an introduction to some of the classical and current issues in the anthropology of Indigenous Australia. The role of anthropology in the representation and governance of Indigenous life is itself an important subject for anthropological inquiry, considering that Indigenous people of Australia have long been the objects of interest and imagination by outsiders for their cultural formulations of kinship, ritual, art, gender, and politics. These representations—in feature films about them (such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and Australia), New Age Literature (such as Mutant Message Down Under), or museum exhibitions (such as in the Museum of Sydney or the Australian Museum)—are now also in dialogue with Indigenous forms of cultural production, in genres as diverse as film, television, drama, dance, art and writing. The course will explore how Aboriginal people have struggled to reproduce themselves and their traditions on their own terms, asserting their right to forms of cultural autonomy and self-determination. Through the examination of ethnographic and historical texts, films, archives and Indigenous life-writing accounts, we will consider the ways in which Aboriginalities are being challenged and constructed in contemporary Australia. The course will consist of lectures interspersed with discussions, student presentations, and films/other media; we may also have guest presenters.

Sample Syllabus

 

This course is a survey of the principal themes and issues in the development of Indigenous art in Australia. It focuses on some of the regional and historical variations of Aboriginal art in the context of the history of a settler nation, while considering the issues of its circulation and evaluation within contemporary discourses of value. Topics include the cosmological dimensions of the art, its political implications, its relationship to cultural identity, and its aesthetic frameworks. Students will visit some of the major national collections of Indigenous Australian art as well as exhibitions of contemporary works. There will also be guest presentations from Indigenous artists and Indigenous art curators.

Sample Syllabus

 


Art and Arts Professions

Berlin

This course covers the theory and practice of photography. In terms of theory, we will examine the technical evolution of the medium: from analogue to digital photography with its rapid development and multiple uses. In terms of practice, we will focus on digital techniques, including Photoshop, Light Room, scanning and printing.

Experimenting with the medium and its changing materials has opened up new horizons and possibilities, which we will study in the work of photographers as well as other visual artists who use this medium. In particular, we will consider how the photographic medium has been used to record history and to make contemporary art history in Germany and globally. Since the course covers the period from the end of WWII to the present, we will take a closer look at the use of photography in the former German Democratic Republic (East Germany) and in the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany & united Germany). The course will then focus on Berlin, a city in constant transformation: from the wall to reunification, from 2000 to the present time with Berlin as a new "metropolis" of contemporary art.

Sample Syllabus

This course will likely carry a supplies & studio fee for all non-Steinhardt Studio Art majors. More details will be available soon.

Sound art is perhaps the multidisciplinary art par excellence. Eluding most attempts at tidy classification, sound art can share formal elements and concerns with traditional sculpture, film and video, performance art, conceptual art, architecture, installation, and of course with music. This studio course will explore sound across its many and sometimes contradictory vectors, allowing students intensive work on sounds and their composition, as well as on projects that explore the broad and rich interaction of sound with other disciplines of art.

There are two main tenets of the course. The first is that issues fundamental to sound art engage some of the key problems of modern and contemporary art. Rather than viewing sound as a peripheral practice, we will see how it has been decisive in the narrative of 20th and 21st century art, exciting many of the key debates that carry through to this day. The second principle is that listening, or careful observation, can be primary in the creative process, coming before expression. From John Cage onward, the value of listening, of observation as a primary creative act, has re-attuned many strains of western art (from conceptual, minimal, and land art to media and installation art) to new ideas of process, complexity, and ecology.

This course can be approached from any level of experience. No previous work with sound or with digital media is required, only a willingness to explore the boundaries of art-making that is a natural outgrowth of working with sound as an artistic medium.

Sample Syllabus

This course will carry a supplies & studio fee for all non-Steinhardt Studio Art majors. More details will be available soon.

Intended for Studio Art students to work on projects over the course of the semester under the guidance of an artist mentor.

Sample Syllabus

Museums mount blockbuster shows. Rappers shoot videos in art galleries. Biennials proliferate, art fairs geographically expand, and auction sales hit new records. At the same time, public arts funding is systematically slashed, emerging artists still struggle, and art criticism remains in its perpetual crisis. The international contemporary art world is a convoluted interplay of aesthetics and economics; ego and idealism. Berlin’s art world may be more production-based and experimental than the art scenes of other
major western cities, but it is still a microcosm of larger movements. Through readings of art theory and criticism, discussions, site visits, guest speakers, and short- and long-form response writing, this course offers an overview of the conventions, trends, history, current developments and myriad structures and
substructures of the contemporary art world in general and Berlin’s in particular. The course delves into contemporary art’s current prevailing discourse via methodological analysis, practical observation, and input from professionals currently working in the art’s institutional and commercial sectors. It also offers a critical look at how these larger art-world structures translate to Berlin.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

The course is focused on photography as an art and photography as a means of communication. It includes aspects of history and the theory of photography and practical photographic education of classic analog/wet darkroom process — i.e. black and white photographic image making and printing. The goal is to develop a new way of seeing through the viewfinder of the camera and to hone critical thinking about photography. This course aims to teach students to experience the photographic works of art and reflect on that experience. Importance is laid on students’ understanding of the photographic image as a means of expressing an individual artistic attitude towards the world.

Sample syllabus

Shanghai

The contemporary art scene in China has developed quickly over the past three decades. The massive political, economic, and social changes the country has undergone since the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976 have dramatically altered the country’s cultural landscape. In this seminar course, the course will survey the main development areas in Chinese contemporary art from the end of the 1920s to the present day. Dedicated to responding to the new textures of China’s metropolitan culture, it will look at the relationship between visual arts, new media, architecture, and performance in the mega-city of Shanghai, often regarded as the cradle of Chinese modernity. The class will be complemented by guest lectures and visits to public museums, galleries and artists’ studios in and around Shanghai. Students will have the opportunity to meet leading figures from the art world in China as well as the international art community, including artists, museum directors, curators, art critics, and art dealers.

Sample Syllabus


Art History

Accra

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore Ghanaian art and art history in their historical, anthropological and archaeological contexts. The course serves both as a survey and critique of the literature on West African art, and as an exploration of method and theory in sub-Saharan art historical research. Students explore major works from key periods of Ghanaian artistic and cultural production and are involved in practical work in laboratories and museums dealing with art specimens from local archaeological sites and ethnographic contexts.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar.

Berlin is a unique modern Metropolis, its alternating history with often-drastic changes offers a comprehensive background to explore and investigate the nature of architecture in correlation to the various development processes of urban culture and life. Architecture is embedded in the urban fabric for which place and time serve as main threads, constantly changing their multifaceted and layered relationships. This urban fabric provides the fertile soil for urban culture and life, which literally takes place in various scales between the public and the private realm, two more threads intertwined to the urban fabric. Experiencing the city through walking, is essential for learning how to observe, see
and read, "Place, Building and Time" in Berlin.
Tours will alternate with classroom discussions and workshops.

Sample Syllabus

 

 

Buenos Aires

This course studies modern and contemporary art and architecture through a strategic focus on the cities of Buenos Aires, New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City. We consider key artworks and architectural movements, approaching art history in urban, socio-historical and contextual terms. Emphasis is placed upon the city as a hub for the production and reception of art.

Cities are multifarious complexes of paradoxical elements, where rhythms of stasis and motion coexist. Every city absorbs creative interchange, while also triggering different types of transformation. Our speculations on the urban environment will bring up multiple questions that point back to and extend beyond the mere physical structure of the city, discovering arenas of social action. How does art exploits the characteristics of the metropolis? How is art distributed and consumed throughout the dense fabric of the city? We will explore art (primarily Latin American art) as a staging ground for the city, and the city as staging ground for art.

Developing comparative perspectives on Buenos Aires, New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City will illuminate the particularities of the places under investigation, albeit with reference to aesthetic trajectories as well as broader technological, economic, and social-political changes. New York is included in our selected network of Latin American cities, acknowledging its critical importance as a center of cultural experimentation where artists (including Latin American artists) share ideas in a global context.

Work in class will focus on both visual and textual analysis, employing images, manifestos and critical essays. The course includes a lively program of tours throughout Buenos Aires, visits to museums and private art collections, and conversations with guest contemporary artists.

Sample Syllabus

 

Florence

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

NYU Students who have already taken ARTH-UA 2 will not receive major credit for ARTH-UA 5 [Renaissance Art survey] or ARTH-UA 6 [Modern Art survey].

This course is an introduction to Renaissance Art by exploring in depth the historical, political and cultural evolution of Italy and Europe between the 14th and the 15th centuries. This overview will be not confined to works of art but will include social and patronage issues - i.e. the role of the guilds, the differences in private, civic and church patronage - that affected the style, form and content of the Italian rich artistic output, which reached a peak often nostalgically referred to by later generations as the “golden age”. Themes such as patronage, humanism, interpretations of antiquity, and Italian civic ideals form a framework for understanding the works of art beyond style, iconography, technique and preservation. The course analyzes the historical and social background of the beginning of the Renaissance during the 14th century and the impact of patronage on art. It then focuses on the early 15th century art in Italy and Europe and deals with the Medici Family’s age. Lastly it analyzes the ‘golden Age’ of the Renaissance, specifically focusing on Verrocchio, Botticelli, Perugino and Ghirlandaio. By the end of this course, students gain a thorough knowledge of the Italian and European Renaissance Age, developing practical perception and a confident grasp of the material, understanding the relationship between both historical and artistic events and valuing the importance of patronage. As the Renaissance works are often still in their original physical settings, during field-studies to museums and churches in Florence students will have a unique opportunity to experience the works as their original viewers did and as their creators intended. 

Sample Syllabus

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

To provide the student with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilizations of ancient Italy from ca. 1000 to 80 B.C.E. with special emphasis on the Etruscans and their relationship to the early Romans. We shall examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning, and the minor arts through power point presentations, the assigned texts, and field trips. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

The course will explore the unusually rich artistic and textual record of medieval holy people and places in Tuscany, and one site Umbria, Assisi. The goal of the course is to consider the intersection of popular religious expression, individual extraordinary lives, and the art and architecture produced by the society to celebrate its spiritual heroes. Students will be immersed in Italian medieval texts, art, and architecture as a means of understanding a vivid past which illuminates medieval civic pride and served as a springboard to the Italian Renaissance. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces to the many villas surrounding the city of Florence. It aims at illustrating their origins, their history from the Middle-Age to the twentieth century, as well as their economic and ideological factors in the relationship with the city of Florence. The course draws on many disciplines, such as architecture, history, economy, social history, history of art, and landscape art. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

The aim of this course is to provide an integrated approach to Museum theory and practice. It is designed for those students who are interested in the history and the nature of Museums, Museum management (including the international art legislation), the methods of research and documentation (file system and photography), conservation methodologies to preserve the collections in a Museum context, and the means of presenting all kinds of art objects to the public (the education role of the museum in the society). Themes such as the change of the artistic taste, the role of the artists, the collectors and the dealers in the creation of the public galleries and the house museums will be discussed. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

In this course, students learn how to ‘read’ and interpret the city by analyzing the architecture and the outdoor spaces that the buildings define. We adopt the approach of art history, architectural history,
and urban planning to study the buildings and monuments of Florence from antiquity to the present. On site, students consider buildings in context, and learn how to describe the architectural language used by architects over the centuries. Students learn about the building materials and technologies. They learn how to identify the typology and dynamics of buildings, monuments, and outdoor spaces, and their transformations (in form and function). They experience the coexistence of private and sacred in religious buildings, and of private and public in both residential and civic buildings.

Sample Syllabus

This course investigates the scope of Italian artistic ingenuity during the past century and a half and puts it in reference to contemporary art movements. Due to Italy’s strong historical legacy, modern Italian artists and architects have gone through an intense struggle to break from academic models. Initially the new movements, such as Impressionism and Art Nouveau, arrived from outside sources, yet beginning with I Macchiaoli, followed by the Futurists, Neo– Rationalists, Arte Povera, and Transavanguardia, Italians were frequently originators of the discourses of new artistic movements. The tide of trends periodically seceded from traditions and then returned to them in critical ways, seen in the metaphysical paintings of Giorgio de Chirico or the wistful pavilions of Aldo Rossi. During the past decade Italy has produced several new institutions for contemporary art and architecture, including MART in Rovereto, the Museo del ‘900 (Museum of the 20th century) in Milan, and MAXXI (Museum of the Arts of the 21st century), devoted specifically to both art and architecture, broadening the historical and critical perspective and providing a stimulus for the art of the future. The course includes two site visits in Florence, one day-trip to the Venice Biennale, one day-trip to Rome.

London

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

The principal aim of this course is to familiarize students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the early Victorian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

London has some of the richest collections of renaissance art in the world. Students in this course will be brought into direct contact with a large variety of artefacts to be found in museums and galleries such as the National Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Museum as well as the British Library. Works by Van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Durer and Holbein will be examined alongside those of less well-known artists. Rather than provide a standard chronological narrative of European Art History c. 1400- c. 1600, focus will be placed on subject areas such as the altarpiece and the private devotional image, the renaissance portrait, graphic practices, print culture, the materials and functions of sculpture, myth and allegory, the cabinet of curiosities, the concept of the 'Renaissance' itself. These topics will not be organised around traditional national or regional 'schools' considered in isolation from one another but instead interconnections will be explored between the development of different types, technical processes and cultural practices across the Netherlands, France, Germany and Italy. A special case will be made of the English Renaissance, in order to place it within the wider European context through additional visits to Westminster Abbey and Hampton Court. 

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only.

London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape.

This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else. 

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

Contemporary art raises vigorous debate and criticism. But what is contemporary about contemporary art? This course introduces you to some of the key issues in dealing critically with contemporary art with a focus on work on display in exhibitions in London, both major national collections and private galleries. The course explores art produced since the late 1950s through case studies of the work of individual artists and through themes which include photography; representations of the body; gallery display; migration, visual imagery of political issues, video practice and installation art. Among other things we consider how contemporary art came to look as it does [with a focus on British art]; the different forms of material and presentation artists have employed; why and how diverse audiences are addressed; how markets, national prizes and private collections shape the kinds of art produced and inform public taste. We also look at the collection and display of contemporary art, on a private and a public scale; dealer galleries and issues of curation.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only

Re-cycling or re-using buildings is one of the most important subjects in the built environment. It is an area in which there have been some remarkable successes in recent years both in America and in Europe: impressive and much loved public buildings have been given new life by progressive architects and developers, helping ensure that our towns and cities retain their individual character. Unlike international modern buildings, historic buildings are strong markers of the industry, aspirations, local materials and the resources of a particular place. Recycling old buildings is crucial so our architectural and social history can be read in the townscape that surrounds us.A course about recycling old buildings presents an opportunity to explore some basic themes in the built environment – architecture history, environmental issues and the rise of the conservation movement in the 19th and 20th centuries. Buildings are responsible for 50% of our carbon emissions each year, and more than half of a building’s energy footprint is expended in the relatively short spell of its construction. ‘Even the best planned new buildings are no match against the preservation, modernization, conversion and re-use of existing buildings when it comes down to the consumption of resources’ (Karl Ganser) Re-using our redundant historic architecture for new purposes has obvious positive benefits for the planet. Equally, upgrading historic buildings in use, like our housing stock, is environmentally smarter that demolishing parts of our cities and starting again with new structures.The locations and nature of industrial production has changed across the world. Most western cities have a surfeit of industrial spaces and buildings lying empty, often in their centres. This course will first cover the story of the development of industrial architecture from the 18th century onwards and look at how these robust, proud and often highly decorative structures can accommodate new uses. We will look at how inventive designers, backed by local government, have found ways of reclaiming the industrial ‘brownfield’ landscapes into new spaces for recreation and development in our cities, focusing on particular examples in New York, London and in Germany.

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

 Art History Students: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

The aim of this course is to offer an introduction to Spanish Art from The Golden Age to the early Nineteenth Century, with special emphasis on El Greco, Diego Velázquez and Francisco de Goya. Given its position as a primary depository for Spanish art, the collection of El Museo del Prado will be a major focus of the course, with regular class visits to the museum and related institutions. The artistic relationship artists of the Spanish School maintained with foreign artists (Bosch, Titian, and Rubens) will be considered in depth.

Contemporary readings in art history are incorporated as relevant to the subject. The intention of the course is to teach students how to approach the formal analysis of paintings within a rich context-based interpretative framework, including the social and historical conditions surrounding artistic production. 

Sample Syllabus

Paris

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Advanced Modern Credit.

This course examines the rise of realist and impressionist art in Europe within its cultural, historical and social contexts. The novelty of these two important movements is considered in relation to preceding artistic movements, namely neo-classicism and romanticism. Works by artists such as Delacroix, Courbet, Millet, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec are studied. The course includes both class lectures with slides and museum visits. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

Open to all NYU Paris students. For NYU Art History students this course counts for Art History Elective Credit.

This course investigates French art of the nineteenth-century, paying particular attention to the way in which historical factors informed artistic production during this period.  Beginning with David, Neo-Classicism and the French Revolution, we will move to the Napoleonic period, Romanticism, the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848, and trace the connection from Realism to Impressionism.  The second half of the course will examine the disparate movements spurred by Impressionism, collectively referred to as Post-Impressionism (including Neo-Impressionism, Synthetism, and Symbolism), and will culminate with the rise of Art Nouveau at the end of the century.  Throughout, we will interrogate how social forces (including politics, gender, race, religion, etc.) influenced the manner in which “Modern” art was produced and understood in nineteenth-century France. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Urban Design credit.

Prague is a unique city, in which all architectural styles combine: from the pre-Romanesque, to Romanesque and Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque and Classicist styles, to the modern ones that include Historicism, Art Nouveau, the original Cubism in architecture, Art Deco, Constructivism and Functionalism, even the post-war Stalinist architecture, and contemporary trends. The city did not undergo extensive renewals such as occurred in other European metropolises, and thus fragments of various epochs have been left standing here side by side, and partially, there is also the medieval urban layout to be seen. Architects and master builders from many European countries worked here and local architects and artists were also influenced by foreign models. The city is in fact an ideal textbook of architecture from the Middle Ages to the present day. The course should take the students through this development chronologically, in lectures accompanied by projections of pictures and short films, but also in visits to typical buildings, including their interiors. The main emphasis will be put on the period of the 19th and 20th centuries, in which the lecturer specializes. Architecture is linked to other fields, such as fine arts, urban planning, national heritage care, industrial design, and others. Teaching will thus also focus on these. During the course, each of the students will present an independent study of one chosen building: they will analyze the building, place it within a broader context of European architecture and supply it with their own illustrations. They will defend the work. At the end of the term they will sit for a test. There is compulsory and recommended specialist literature in English available for them, and they are expected to supplement the information gained at lectures and excursions by self-study. By the end of the term the student should have acquired some knowledge of the complex development of Central-European architecture, of the most significant figures, and be fairly well informed in related fields.

Sample syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

This course presents a survey of art and architecture in Prague and its environs - from the Middle Ages to the present - placed within the context of the main periods and movements of Western art history. The course will be rooted in a discussion of the city of Prague, and students are encouraged through excursions and assignments to become acquainted with the city's architecture, monuments and urban design. Students will learn to analyse formal aspects of art and architectural styles (from Romanesque to modern) and will also be encouraged to investigate their sources and theoretical foundations. Emphasis will be given to the historical and cultural context of art styles and movements. We will also look at art patronage in some key periods of Czech history to see how this reflects political, cultural and ideological change. Classroom lectures will be combined with regular excursions to examine works of art and architecture at first hand. These will include architectural walking tours and visits to temporary exhibitions as well as the city's major art galleries.

Sample syllabus


Asian/Pacific/American Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Sydney

This course is a survey of the principal themes and issues in the development of Indigenous art in Australia. It focuses on some of the regional and historical variations of Aboriginal art in the context of the history of a settler nation, while considering the issues of its circulation and evaluation within contemporary discourses of value. Topics include the cosmological dimensions of the art, its political implications, its relationship to cultural identity, and its aesthetic frameworks. Students will visit some of the major national collections of Indigenous Australian art as well as exhibitions of contemporary works. There will also be guest presentations from Indigenous artists and Indigenous art curators.

Sample Syllabus

 


Biology

London

Prerequisite: General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125) or Advanced General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 127). AP or any other advanced standing credit in chemistry is not an acceptable prerequisite.

Students registering for this course must also register for Lecture & Recitation.

Introductory course for Science majors designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics and history and classification of life forms and evolution. Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology and biochemistry as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.

Sample Syllabus


Business

Florence

An introduction to the area of financial accounting. Encompasses accounting concepts from the point of view of the corporate investor and business management. Accounting procedures are discussed to facilitate the comprehension of the recording, summarizing, and reporting of business transactions. The basic principles of asset valuation and revenue and cost recognition are presented. Various asset, liability, and capital accounts are studied in detail with emphasis on an analytical and interpretive approach. The area of financial accounting is further analyzed through a discussion of the concepts and underlying financial statement analysis and the exposition of funds flow. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Analysis (or BOTH STAT-UB 1 and STAT-UB 3) OR equivalent.

Designed to give students a better understanding of how firms can gain competitive advantage from their operations function. Typically this requires the firm to achieve, at a minimum, cost, quality and ecological parity; responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs and desires; rapid time to market; process technology leadership; and sufficient and responsive capacity. A problem-solving framework is developed that enables students to undertake managerial and technical analysis that should result in the desired competitive advantage. Both service and manufacturing case examples are utilized.

Sample Syllabus

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from instructors and staff.

Sample Syllabus 

London

This course is only open to Stern BPE Students.

This course provides students with an overview of the theoretical traditions inspiring current research in international relations (IR). IR is a discipline which attempts to explain processes and events in world politics. Primarily emerging as a way to explain the behaviour of nation-states and their interactions, the discipline has expanded with the onset of globalization to explore an array of actors, institutions and processes which include but simultaneously transcend the nation-state.

The course will focus on the major theories of IR, and how theoretical debates inform key literature in major subfields of the discipline. The course is constructed in such a way as to familiarize students with core debates and cleavages in the field, for example between behavioural and ideological approaches to the study of world politics. There will also be a focus on some of the key substantive subfields of IR such as international organisations, humanitarian intervention, and global governance. Students will be encouraged to explore the efficacy of different theoretical approaches in explaining phenomena in world politics.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR equivalent AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Foundations of Finance (FINC-UB 2) and Statistics or equivalents.

The class focuses on the nature of financial management from a number of perspectives including the national, the corporate and the individual, but particularly the corporate. You will become familiar with the financial system, including that relating to banking, though there will be little overlap with courses that deal with the functioning of financial markets. The importance of behavioural finance will also be stressed during the course. 

Sample Syllabus

Investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. Develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems. Introduces the student to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis, and class discussion.

Sample Syllabus

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Analysis (or BOTH STAT-UB 1 and STAT-UB 3) OR equivalent.

Companies seek to gain and then maintain competitive advantage so that they can maximize the wealth of their stakeholders. They use their operations to gain competitive advantage by obtaining cost leadership or parity; consistent quality superiority; shorter time to market; responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs and desires; sufficient capacity; utilization of innovative process and product technology; and ensuring environmental neutrality. This course touches briefly on all of the above competitive advantages whilst consistently stressing a problem-solving approach.

Sample Syllabus

This course is only open to juniors and seniors.

The Law, Business and Society course builds on prior coursework within the Social Impact Core Curriculum by challenging students to think about legal systems and appreciate how they have evolved and continue to evolve in relation to business and society. The interaction between law and business is multi-dimensional involving social, political, ethical and technological considerations. Students will examine how key areas of business law influence the structure of domestic and international business relationships, while honing their analytical, communication, conflict resolution and team problem solving skills. The students will learn how businesses play an active role in shaping the very laws that govern them through lobbying, public relations and the media.

Sample Syllabus Coming Soon

Madrid

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Sample Syllabus.  

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR equivalent AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Sample Syllabus.

Prague

Investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. Develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems. Introduces the students to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis and class discussion.

Sample syllabus

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Sample syllabus

Curriculum. Business and its Publics examines the relationships between corporations and society, particularly the social issues that arise from business operations. This course focuses on how companies communicate with multiple audiences: their various stakeholders. Students will learn business communication principles and have multiple opportunities to apply them to specific oral and written assignments, with the objective of enhancing your ability to write, present, and speak as a business professional. Practical applications will include 1) creating persuasive presentations and documents; 2) practicing team leadership and communication; and 3) effective management of time, tasks and deliverables.

Sample syllabus

Shanghai

This course focuses on China’s political and economic development over the last century and a half with particular attention to the last 33 years, the so-called Reform Period. Our three primary objectives are to (1) understand the historical trajectory of China’s development path; (2) consider in what ways and to what degree the growth experiences of East Asia’s high-performing economies helped inform China’s economic policymakers decisions and shed light on the prospects for the long-term success of reforms in China; (3) assess the state of China’s contemporary political economy and the current role of the government in generating or inhibiting economic activity.

This course addresses contemporary management challenges stemming from changing organizational structures, complex environmental conditions, new technological developments, and increasingly diverse workforces. It highlights critical management issues involved in planning, organizing, controlling, and leading an organization. Ultimately, it aims to strengthen students’ managerial potential by providing general frameworks for analyzing, diagnosing, and responding to both fundamental and complex organizational situations. It also provides opportunities for students to enhance their communication and interpersonal skills, which are essential to effective management. The structure of the course encourages learning at multiple levels: through in-class lectures, exercises, and discussions; in small teams carrying out projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the field of marketing by introducing and developing central concepts and philosophies of marketing, and exploring the relationship of marketing with other business disciplines. Keeping in mind the perspectives of both producer and consumer, the course examines the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. The course concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Ethical issues in marketing are also addressed. In addition to lecture, the course uses case studies and student projects as methods for student learning.

Sample Syllabus

Every professional business person must be aware of how legal systems work and effect business decisions. Furthermore, the interaction between Law and Business is multidimensional involving international, ethical, and technological considerations. In this course, students examine how key areas of business law, including contracts, torts, and business organizations, influence the structure of domestic and international business relationships. Students actively participate in legal studies designed to enhance business skills such as analytical thinking, written communication, oral presentation, conflict resolution, and team work problem-solving.

Sample Syllabus

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from the instructor.

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR equivalent AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structure and financial asset valuation. This course seeks to equip students with a fundamental understanding of the concepts and principles of finance. The main topics of the course are time value of money, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing (CAPM), equity valuation, arbitrage pricing, fixed income securities and derivatives. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. Every effort will be made to relate the course material to current financial news.

Throughout the course the emphasis will be on two main areas: learning conceptual knowledge through theory and problem solving; and critical thinking through the application of real-life scenarios and local cases. The course will incorporate aspects of Australian securities market and financial institutions and a comparative approach will be adopted in demonstrating similarities and differences between the U.S. capital market and the Australian capital market.

Sample Syllabus

This course evaluates marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. It presents a comprehensive framework that includes a) researching and analyzing customers, company, competition, and the marketing environment, b) identifying and targeting attractive segments with strategic positioning, and c) making product, pricing, communication, and distribution decisions. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

Only NYU Stern BPE students may register for this course under the BPEP-UB 9044 number. All other students should register under POL-UA 9530. For Non-BPE Stern, this course does not count for Stern credit, though Stern students are welcome to take this course as an elective.

Pre-requisites include successful completion of one of the following courses: (1) Comparative Politics (POL-UA 500) at the Square, (2) International Politics (POL-UA 700) at the Square, or (3) World Politics in London.  A course in Macroeconomics is recommended.

Latin America has long been recognized as the world region with the highest levels of economic inequality. Contestation around this state of affairs has been and continues to be central to political dynamics throughout the region. This seminar reviews literature devoted to explaining the unequal distribution of resources and power in Latin America, with particular attention given to structural features of the region’s economies, the configuration of social and political interests and the distributive impact of different combinations of public policies. Perspectives from political economy and political sociology will be deployed in an effort to understand and explain apparent improvements in income and resource distribution during the past several years and consider the precariousness of these advances in the face of the current economic slowdown in the region. Although Latin America provides the geographic focus of the course, we will engage broader currents of thinking about how inequalities arise and persist over time both in that region and elsewhere.

The central objective of the seminar is to familiarize students with key aspects of contemporary Latin American political economy and to situate distributive trends both historically and in light of the core development challenges facing the region in the 21st century. The overarching perspective will be regional, but students will be encouraged to delve deeply into the experience of particular countries, analyzing how political and economic factors have converged to shape the contours of inequality in distinctive settings. Assigned readings analyze a wide range of countries and draw from several disciplines, including political science, economics, sociology, history, anthropology and geography.


Sample syllabus (PDF)


Chemistry

London

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 102 College Chemistry II or its equivalent.

Students registering for this course must register for lecture, laboratory, and recitation.

An introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds, the course is presented in the functional group framework incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, and spectroscopy (IR, NMR, UV/visible, and mass spectroscopy). 

Laboratory provides training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, including crystallization, distillation, extraction, and other separation techniques such as column chromatography and gas chromatography. Experiments involving the synthesis of organic compounds are introduced as well as those performing qualitative organic analysis.

Sample Lecture Syllabus

Sample Lab Syllabus


Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies

Buenos Aires

This class begins with a review of adolescent and young adult developmental theory to provide students with a framework of the psychosocial conflicts present during the college years. In addition to that, students are also presented with research on relocation, from tourism to migration to exile. Rather than looking at these issues from a psychopathological perspective, however, this course turns traditional psychology on its head and examines the theories and tenants of positive psychology. As we survey the contributions that positive psychology has made in helping individuals to create change in their lives, we find elevated self-esteem, improved physical well-being, and an increase in the overall sense of success to be achievable outcomes for college students. This class uses the international educational experience as a laboratory, or a practicum, from which students draw a mass of raw experiential and empirical data that will be analyzed with the theoretical and practical tools of the discipline. At the conclusion of the course, students are charged with synthesizing this material and creating their own project to improve mental health awareness within the NYU community exploring the possibilities of their host society.

Sample Syllabus

London

Prerequisite: This course is open to students who have completed an introductory course in psychology (PSYCH-UA 1: Introduction to Psychology) and a course in either child and adolescent psychopathology
(CAMS-UA 101: Child and Adolescent Psychopathology) or abnormal psychology (PSYCH-UA 51: Abnormal Psychology) or have received consent of the instructor.

Children and adolescents suffer worldwide from significant mental health stressors, but how mental health and illness are perceived and addressed varies greatly around the world. The first part of the course will provide a brief overview of human rights, child development, social determinants of mental health, trauma and resilience, and the global public health significance of mental illness. Using this framework, the impact of selected salient cross-cultural factors affecting mental health (i.e. poverty, war and conflict, and gender-based exploitation) on children’s development and wellbeing will be studied. Throughout the course, various perspectives will be considered, while dominant paradigms will be recognized and critically examined. Lastly, the course will conclude on a pragmatic level—deliberating specific settings, available resources, barriers, and preventative proposals. Selected case studies from the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East will be used to illustrate key concepts. Through lectures, readings, documentaries, and active discussion this course will provide an engaging forum to consider and debate child and adolescent mental health issues globally.

Sample Syllabus


Cinema Studies

Buenos Aires

The course is designed as an overview of Argentine Cinema during the last fifty years. The aftermath of World War II, the downfall of Peronist government, and the decline of the studio system produced a series of political, social, and cultural transformations that have been reflected in the films made since then.

In the following years, some facts acquired great importance: the emergence of an independent cinema (on the margins of the industrial system), the connection to other continental cinemas, the relationship with artistic avant-gardes around the world, the experimentation, the social testimony and the political militancy. Cinema is a privileged path to study not only the aesthetic transformations but also the social and political changes at the end of XXth Century.

The syllabus will concentrate on these mutations produced during the second half of the century. Through the study of some representative films by Leopoldo Torre Nilsson, Leonardo Favio, Fernando Solanas, Adolfo Aristarain, Lucrecia Martel, and Juan José Campanella, among others, we will analyze the aesthetic innovations of the so-called Generación del '60; the rise of political cinema at the beginning of the '70s; the complex relationship between films and society during the military dictatorship; and the explosion of the New Argentine cinema in the '90s.

Special attention will be given to certain topics: cinema and avant-garde movements, high culture and mass culture, films as political weapon, and, finally, cinema as a privileged aesthetic witness of historical processes. 

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Co-requisite: Enrollment in a screening time.

The Italian Cinema is a good way to study the whole Italian history, society, ideology and behaviours. The students will have the opportunity to know such authors as Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Antonioni, Visconti, Pasolini, Bertolucci, who are well known in the US.

The course will also focus on the difference between auteur films and genre films (comedy, roman-mythological, western, melodrama); it will stress the gender point of view, the problem of a national identity, the role of the film industry. Strong attention will be paid to the relationship between Italian film and literature, art history, television and other disciplines. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

London

Students registering for this class must also register for the Screenings section.

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

This course provides an exciting and challenging introduction to British Cinema, studying the rich and varied relationships between the society and its films. It is organised in four main parts, offering an Introduction to Film Studies; a look at National Identity and the Cinema in relation to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the UK as a whole; case studies in key authors Mike Leigh and Ken Loach; and approaches to narrative and genre.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

The course will enrich the students’ understanding of Israeli Cinema as a microcosm of the young, vibrant, and continually changing Israeli state and society. We will analyze the cinematic expression of the themes behind the inception and evolution of the small yet multifaceted country, and note the differences between the cinema of the first and second wave of Israeli filmmakers.

Syllabus under revision


Classics

Florence

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

To provide the student with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilizations of ancient Italy from ca. 1000 to 80 B.C.E. with special emphasis on the Etruscans and their relationship to the early Romans. We shall examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning, and the minor arts through power point presentations, the assigned texts, and field trips. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus


Comparative Literature

Accra

This course shall focus on the place of women in the literary tradition, an issue that is very current in the discourse on the literature of Africa and its Diaspora. Women writers have emerged at the forefront of the movement to restore African women to their proper place in the study of African history, society and culture. In this process, the need to recognize the women as literary artists in the oral mode has also been highlighted. Furthermore, the work of women writers is gaining increasing significance and deserves to be examined within the context of canon formation. Authors and texts will be examined, focusing on such topics as the heritage of women's literature, images of women in the works of male writers; women in traditional and contemporary society; women and the African family in the literary tradition; literature as a tool for self-definition and self-liberation; African women writers; female expressions of cultural nationalism in the Caribbean; female novelists of the African continent; Black women dramatists; the poetry of African women. Emphasis will be placed on the works and thought of a select personality from time to time to celebrate a significant moment in history.

Sample Syllabus

 

 

Note: this course is open to all students for elective credit. Comparative
literature majors in track ii (literary and cultural studies) may count this
course toward one of their non-core major requirements.

The course examines certain recurring themes and critical issues in post-colonial narratives in Africa. It begins with a look at the debate and polemics around post-colonialism as a critical and theoretical concept. It then dwells on specific narratives, mainly novels by African writers, works located in the period following classical colonialism. The reading of these narratives is informed by such critical issues as the crisis of cultures in contact; personal, class, ethnic and national identities; the politics of gender; debates over language; the aesthetics and politics of art; strategic transformations in narrative form, etc.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course may be counted towards the Cultural Specialization and Elective requirement for Comp Lit majors, with prior DUS approval.

This course focuses on literary representations of WWI and WWII. The online course pack includes examples of the political and military rhetoric to which Montale and Hemingway objected, historical essays and images (war photographs, recruitment posters, etc.), as well as the shorter texts we are studying. Central themes in the course are the concepts of political literature and historical fiction and the contrasting approaches and theoretical premises of classical realism and modernism. Among the supplementary sources available in the Villa Ulivi library are two good cultural histories on the subject: James Shehan Where Have All the Soldiers Gone and Mark Mazower Dark Continent. Other recurring issues will be gender, sexuality, religion, class politics, kitsch, psychoanalysis, rhetoric, and power.  

Sample Syllabus

Prague

The course is focused on exploring Franz Kafka’s work – stories, novels, diaries and letters – in the context of fin de siècle Prague and the birth of modernism. We will take a closer look at the cultural and social context of Central Europe (literature and the arts, but also the Modernist architecture of Adolf Loos, Simmel’s sociology of the metropolitan life, Freud’s analysis of the unconscious, Brentano’s psychology, the resonance of Nietzsche’s philosophy, or the emergence of new media like phonograph and silent film) in the first two decades of the 20th century. In addition, we will discuss the adaptations of Kafka’s work and its impact on later art, fiction and film (Borges, Welles, Kundera, Roth, Švankmajer). The topics discussed through Kafka’s writings and other related works include: man and metropolis, family, estrangement, authorship, time, writing and media, travelling, territories and identities, languages, animals, art and pain. We will be especially interested in how these phenomena transform when represented in and through the medium of literary fiction.

Sample syllabus

This course endeavors to explore the reconstruction of Central and Eastern Europe through the currency of its poetry, through the desperate honor of its poets. With the war and subsequent occupation of Europe, literature, especially poetry, replaced consensus politics. Poets became the true accountants, and their ledgers contained the unprofitability of the human soul. A reading of the finest poets of the past half-century situates the times and the seminal engagements born to restore independence. The poets were/are personally well-known to the lecturer, with the sad exception of the great Russian poets, Celan and Brecht.

Sample Syllabus

This class is devoted not only to a "close reading" of the selected texts, but also to relevant broader issues. While the approach and methods are interdisciplinary, the main emphasis is on literary theory (explaining and applying basic literary terms), literary history (both American and European), and literary criticism (analyzing different responses to given works). Every class starts with the oral presentation delivered by a student, then there is a minilecture by the teacher, and a discussion follows.

Sample syllabus


Creative Writing

Accra

This is a workshop type course intended for a small group of students, each with a strong aptitude and/or demonstrated talent for creative writing. Our basic objective is to guide students into a more systematic approach to creative writing in any of the main genres, especially fiction and poetry. Each student is expected to engage in critical discussions on samples of their own writing as well as on writing by other members of the class. Our focus shall be on developing a grasp of the rudiments and general mechanics of the writer's craft, while at the same time allowing for a fuller realization of the personal/individual creative impulse and talent. Some class sessions will be devoted to various types of writing exercises, others to the discussion of sample texts, most of it produced by members of the class. Each student will be expected to share his/her work with the class and possibly with a wider audience when possible. At the end of the semester, each student will be expected to have produced a substantial body of creative writing for assessment by the course instructors.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

This is an introductory course in creative writing: prose is predominant, all genres are accepted, and no previous experience or expertise is required. The thematic focus starts with the condition of being a foreigner abroad, outside of one’s normal context or comfort zone. Many readings and writing exercises draw specifically on being in Buenos Aires and the Latin American region. Both writing exercises and reading combine to motivate and refine students´ work as they expand on the chronicler’s main subjects of place, people, and things.

Grounding one’s writing with fact/verisimilitude is key, as is detailed observation plus awareness of one’s own position in the greater context. Later details involve developing plot and dramatic tension (suspense), using diverse narrative points-of-view, and working with voice and character.

The course allows for flexibility in terms of genre: students may work with poetic discourse or with fiction or with non-fiction and even autobiography. All work will be discussed in accord with the criteria of literary writing (i.e. this is not a “journaling” or “blogging” class); hence, reading as well as writing exercises will focus predominantly on working with language in attentive, even innovative ways.

Critical analysis of published texts and of each others´ work are guided by the instructor to develop knowledge and application of literary critical criteria. The students give opinions and also intuitive sensations about the readings on issues like how a text is working, what strategies it is employing, and what effects it is producing thereby.

Sample Syllabus

London

Beginning workshop in creative writing designed to explore and refine the student's individual writing interests. This course may include fiction and/or poetry and creative non-fiction. 

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

In this class students are encouraged to consider the intersectional environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) that they interact with and within, and how their sensibilities differ living away from home to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing. We will engage with a diverse range of readings – featuring many Australian authors – and discuss technical elements and affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Weeks are devoted to crafting the short story and poetry. Students will complete weekly ‘microfiction’ homework exercises based upon images they take or find, and participate in in-class writing exercises, all of which will contribute to the writing journal submitted with the final work. The class emphasises the importance of embodied interaction with the city through a field trip using ‘The Disappearing’ – a downloadable app featuring over 100 site-specific poems spanning a ‘poetic map’ of Sydney, created by The Red Room Company. Students will think about the possibilities of marrying new technologies with writing as they navigate using poems as landmarks. Students workshop their drafts during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique. This takes the form of a discussion in-class and students are required to submit written critical feedback on their classmates’ drafts in an online forum. At the end of the course students will have the opportunity to showcase their work at a reading night to the rest of the NYU Sydney student body and invited faculty.

Sample Syllabus


Cultures and Contexts (College Core Curriculum / Morse Academic Plan)

Florence

The course examines how Italian identity has been transformed through encounters with foreigners. These foreigners were not only invading armies and colonizing powers but also artists and scholars, travelers and tourists. All contributed in fundamental ways to the evolution of Italian society and culture.Through the study of primary sources we will explore, for example, how the Greek, Arab, Byzantine, and Jewish presences reshaped Italian civilization up until the Renaissance. As well as outlining the historical circumstances for each of these encounters, our account will focus on their cultural consequences from a number of perspectives, from science to language, from philosophy to art and architecture. A field trip to Ravenna (capital of the Western Roman Empire, then of the Ostrogothic Kingdom, and later of the Byzantine Exarchate) will offer a vantage point to appreciate the many layers of Italian cultural history. As a case study, we will analyze a number of coeval reports on the sacks of Rome by the Visigoths (410 AD) and by the troops of Charles V (1527).Florence will be used as a primary source. The city and its surroundings will provide the most favorable context also to address the issue of tourism, from the Grand Tour to the most recent developments of mass tourism in Italy.

Sample Syllabus

London

The idea of British national identity has been built around a sense of united statehood within the confines of the four nations comprising the United Kingdom, ruling overseas territories. As such, it conveyed a sense of a multi-national empire ruled by monarchs, but developing over time into a benign, democratic, constitutional monarchy, generally through peaceful, not revolutionary change. The British have seen themselves historically as freedom-loving, independent, industrial, tolerant, Protestant and individualistic. These myths of national image have been forged partly through conflict with other nations over many centuries and reflect a nationalistic pride in military success and the maintenance of the largest empire the world has ever seen. Changes since 1945 have seen the collapse of that empire, membership in the European Union, large-scale immigration, changing gender politics, and the devolution of power to Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales. This has inevitably led to major challenges to traditional British views of their national identity. Includes fieldtrips to key sites.

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

Analyzes the ways in which historical, geopolitical, cultural, artistic, and popular views function to constitute and continuously transform a national culture. Concentrates on epistemological constructions of Spain—the idea of Spain—that emerge from competing external and internal perspectives. Students examine how this national culture is constructed, first analyzing Spain from North African perspectives through Sephardic nostalgic poetry and the Hispano-Arabic literary traditions. The American perspective pits notions of Spanish imperial power and grandeur against the Black Legend, a term that Protestant circles in Europe and the United States promoted to attack the legitimacy of Spain’s New World empire. A final focus on European views analyzes the depiction of Spain as the embodiment of German and French Romantic ideals beginning at the end of the 17th century and the reemergence of the same notion during the Spanish Civil War (1933–36). Throughout, students examine principal textual and visual images that contribute to the historical and contemporary construction of a national culture that emerged at geographic and cultural crossroads.

Sample Syllabus

 

Paris

France and the U.S. have a habit of looking at one another as anti-models when it comes to discussions of assimilation and difference, “race,” identity, community and diversity. In this course, we explore this comparison as a productive means for re-considering these terms. Why is the notion of “ethnic community” so problematic in France? And why do Americans insist on the “homogeneity” of the French nation, even as, at various points throughout modern French history, France has received more immigrants to its shores than the United States? Through readings, film screenings, and site visits we explore the movements and encounters that have made Paris a rich, and sometimes controversial, site of cultural exchange. Topics include contemporary polemics on questions such as headscarves, the banlieue, the new Paris museums of immigration and “primitive” art, affirmative action and discrimination positive, historic expressions of exoticism, négritude, and anti-colonialism. Occasional case studies drawn from the American context help provide a comparative framework for these ideas. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Prague

Russia’s rich and multifaced cultural identity has been shaped in a thousand year long process of interaction with a range of diverse cultural formations of the ‘West’ and ‘East’ (including Byzantine/ Christian ‘East’, Central Asian/Muslim ‘East’, South Asian/Indian ‘East”, and East Asian/Confucian ‘East’). For the last 300 years, since the era of Peter the Great, Russia’s greatest statesmen, philosphers, religious thinkers, writers, poets and creative artists were obssesed with the question of Russia’s distinctive cultural identity. This passionate search for the ‘Russian soul’ is apparently far from over, as the recent rise of interest in the ideas of ‘Eurasianism’ and ‘Neo-Slavophilism’ testifies. This course in Russian intellectual history explores the sources of Russia’s unique cultural blend through examination of some of the principal textual and artistic images representative of traditions that emerged at the geographic and cultural crossroads of Eastern Europe, including those which constitute Russia’s unique contribution to world culture. Students are encouraged to think critically and with a historically informed sensibility about the diverse perceptions of reality in cultures different from their own, especially about such fundamental categories as national identity, religion, morality, community, individual, gender, and the "other."

Sample syllabus
 

Prague is without doubts one of the most important historical, geopolitical and cultural capitals of Central Europe. The concept of Central Europe is somewhat elusive and it is difficult to define it by geographical or political categories. Often, it is characterized simply as a space on the edge between the West and East. However, most scholars agree that there is a distinct Central European culture. Identified as having been one of the world’s richest sources of creative talent and thought between the 17th and 20th centuries, Central Europe was represented by many distinguished figures such as Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Kant, Goethe and Hegel; later followed by Kafka, Rilke, Freud, Mendel and Dvorak, to mention at least some. Central European culture is based on historical, social and cultural characteristics shared by the countries of this geopolitical entity. It is a result of complicated historical, political, ethnic, cultural, artistic and religious interactions throughout more then thousand years of its history. We explore characteristics of Central Europe primarily from the perspective of Prague and its cultural history, which is so typical and almost archetypal for this region. Students study geopolitical characteristics and various phenomena that co-create the idea of Central Europe. Taking advantage of course location in Prague, students have the opportunity to examine the primary sources and artifacts (literature, music, art, film) in their contexts and environment.

Sample syllabus
 


Dramatic Literature

London

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $495 in Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester).

The course examines the main features of modern drama from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Each week there is a theatre visit to see plays from the period in a number of different venues across the city: for example, the National Theatre, the Royal Court, selected West End houses, non-theatre spaces converted for performance, and site specific locations. The productions are chosen to illustrate the immense variety of work produced in theatre during the twentieth century and current today. They also provide excellent examples of contemporary techniques in theatre making, ranging from interpretations of traditional dramas and comedies, new writing, physical theatre, musicals, cross media pieces, and other alternative forms. Significant aspects of modern drama are also considered in class through examples on DVDs, examination of critical reviews, and analysis of additional texts where appropriate. 

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $263 in Fall 2016 and Sppring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester).

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors' companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet. 

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100.

The course offers students a formal and theoretical analysis of some of the most important Spanish films from recent decades, highlighting the wide variety of genre and style in Spanish cinematographic production. Discussion of the movies will give relevance to their historical and social context. Special emphasis will be given to the three most relevant Spanish film directors of today: Pedro Almodóvar, Alejandro Amenábar, and Alberto Rodríguez.

Sample Syllabus

Paris

This course will examine contemporary and classical French theater from a new perspective. Far from scholarly chronological norms, we will use contemporary writings in order to better study their classical sources and inspirations. Theatre is an artistic discipline that is constantly in communication with its past. Theatre examines its roots in order to reorient and renew itself. Actors and directors reinvent the verses of Corneille, Moliere and Shakespeare so that they can better discover the writings of today. Dramaturgists reflect contemporary society, yet are always nourished by their predecessors so that they can either create a connection or break with them definitively. In this course we will examine great contemporary authors such as Jarry, Cocteau, Giraudoux, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, Koltes, Wajdi Mouawad, etc. As for the great classical figures, we will discuss such various authors as Sophocles, Corneille, Shakespeare and Racine. How did Jean-Paul Sartre use Corneille and Racine to give credence to his theatre? How was Cocteau or Giraudoux inspired by ancient theatre? What did Koltes take from classical tragedy in order to create his own dramas? This course will examine both theatrical writings as well as current productions in order to answer these questions. All the performances seen for the course as well as the works read will be discussed in oral presentations or written summaries. Conducted in French.

On December 28th, 1895, cinema was given its official characteristics by the Lumière brothers in Paris. If for over a century, the “Seventh Art” has been an essential element and a vehicle for French culture, the city of Paris has epitomized the evolution and contradictions of the French cinema industry. Focusing on the main tendencies in contemporary French cinema, we will ask the following questions: How do the French filmmakers depict the city of Lights, the City of Love, the City of Horror? How decisive a representation of Paris and its suburbs can be? Why do the images of Paris illustrate the history of French cinema? What do they show about French culture?

Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the notion of French culture through an analysis of French cinema. Placing films in their historical and cultural context, we consider how cinema provides a window on French society, while recognizing that they are cultural products specific to a particular historical moment. Social history, cultural archetypes and artistic creation will be some of the topics under consideration. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

The course will enrich the students’ understanding of Israeli Cinema as a microcosm of the young, vibrant, and continually changing Israeli state and society. We will analyze the cinematic expression of the themes behind the inception and evolution of the small yet multifaceted country, and note the differences between the cinema of the first and second wave of Israeli filmmakers.

Syllabus under revision


East Asian Studies

Shanghai

This course introduces students to Chinese language, history and culture. It is aimed at students with no prior knowledge of Chinese. The language component of the course runs for 14 weeks and focuses on the development of competence in verbal communication and communication structures which can be used in daily life in China. The ‘daily culture’ component includes weekly excursions that are closely tied to the language topics being studied. The history and broader cultural components of the course will start from Week 8 and involve a weekly lecture and/or film to provide students with a basic overview of important historical events, as well as more recent economic, social and environmental developments. This course does not cover Elementary Chinese I. It is designed for students who have already completed their language requirement for their major or who will complete their language requirement with another language. Students cannot take this class if they have already completed Elementary Chinese I or equivalent or more advanced course. This course is not intended for native Chinese speakers. Finally, completion of this course does not qualify students to take Elementary Chinese II. 

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correct basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level-appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have Chinese-speaking background and who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily life situations. It aims to develop students' correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing. Students who pass this class can enroll in "Intermediate Chinese I for Advanced Beginners".

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have Chinese-speaking background and who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily life situations. It aims to develop students' correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing. Students who pass this class can enroll in "Advanced Chinese 1".

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guesses about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Sample Syllabus

In this course we will select a number of critical issues in modern Chinese history to examine the political, social and cultural transformations of modern China. Topics of lectures include Confucianism and its modern fate, popular movements, the Great Leap Forward Movement, the role of Shanghai in modern China, Tiananmen Movement and the prospect of Chinese political reforms. The course will be approached through lectures, site visits, class discussions, and research.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines Chinese films in their social, cultural and political context. Spanning the history of Chinese film, this course traces the stylistic development of Chinese cinema, and the political and social movements that shaped film content and aesthetics as well as the structure of film production.

Sample Syllabus


Economics

Buenos Aires

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

There are two parts to this course. In the first part of the course we will study two of the main financial asset markets: bond markets and stock markets. We will study the concept and determination of interest rates; the risk structure and the term structure of interest rates; stock pricing and the efficient markets hypothesis; cross-border arbitrage. We will also analyze financial structure in Argentina and other Latin American banks.

In the second part of the course we will study the monetary and financial system. We will study how money is created, the tools of monetary policy, the commercial banking industry and its links to monetary policy and the Central Bank, and how monetary policy affects the economy in general. In this part we will also analyze how market failures (such as information asymmetries) and distortionary policies (such as financial repression) may hinder the contribution of financial markets and monetary policy to macroeconomic stability. The roles of state-owned banks in Latin American economies will also be discussed.

Sample Syllabus

 

Florence

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Pre-calculus or equivalent level of mathematical training

This introductory course provides students with a basic understanding of fundamental (macro)economic theories. The course is concerned with the definition and the theory of determination of national income, employment, business fluctuations, and price level. It also introduces students to the functions
of money in a fractional-reserve banking system. The concepts of economic "circular flow”, national income accounting, unemployment, inflation, government taxation and spending and money will be defined, explained and discussed. Finally instruments, functioning and effectiveness of both monetary and fiscal policy aimed to stabilize prices and maintain high levels of output and employment are discussed in the current macroeconomic context of major world economies.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Pre-calculus or equivalent level of mathematical training

This course provides a survey of microeconomic issues at introductory level. We will make use of theories and empirical examples to understand key aspects of the significant changes that take place in the world economies. We will explore a wide range of economic phenomena including poverty and income distribution, firms' market power and costs structure, firms' investments and business strategies, the role of antitrust law and regulation. Every piece of theory is related to applications so as to offer a continuing sense of the relevance of theory to reality. Conducted in English.

Sample syllabus.

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 1 Economic Principles or ECON-UA 5 Intro to Economic Analysis or equivalents

The financial crisis that hit the global economy since the summer of 2008 is without precedent in post-war economic history. Although its size and extent are exceptional. the crisis has many features in common with similar financial-stress driven recession episodes in the past. However, this time there’s something different, with the crisis being global akin to the events that triggered the Great Depression of the 1930s. This crisis spread quickly and rapidly moved from the US to European countries that show the weakest economic indicators (PIIGS: Portugal, Ireland and Italy, Greece and Spain). This course will focus on the long run causes, consequences and EU responses to the crisis, conditionally on the characteristics of the countries involved. We will focus on the long process of European Integration and discuss whether it may represent a possible solution to the recent crisis. We shall also examine the discussion on the EU- US Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and EU development policies since EU is the main donor worldwide.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

This course offer a perspective on the workings of the monetary and financial system within a country and at an international level. The role of money and the tools to conduct monetary policy will be analyzed in detail. The concept of the value of money now and in the future will help us understand the role of interest rates and of risk; various way to store wealth will take us into the structure of financial markets where financial instruments are created and traded to meet diverse needs. Some basic concepts on the role played by commercial banks will introduce the function of the Central Bank and of monetary policy in the overall goal of ensuring financial stability to the system. Current issues, such as the role of the European Central Bank and the instability created by the subprime mortgage crisis, will be discussed.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Microeconomics & Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1 and ECON-UA 2) or equivalents.

The field of International Economics is traditionally divided into two parts. First,
“International Trade,” the microeconomic part, attempts to answer questions arising from trade in goods and services. For example: how does trade arise among nations? Which nations will trade with each other, and which goods and services will they trade? How does trade impact different groups within a country, and how does government policy alter these impacts? Second, “International Finance,” the macroeconomic part, attempts to answer questions arising from global financial markets and their impact on macroeconomic activity. For example, how are currency exchange rates determined? How do changes in exchange rates affect economic aggregates, such as a country’s trade deficit? This course will cover both parts and give a broad picture of economic interdependences among nations.

Sample syllabus.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics, & International Economics (NYU ECON-UA 10, ECON-UA 12, & ECON-UA 238) or equivalents.  International Economics can be taken as co-requisite with special permission.

This course aims at offering a global perspective on development and growth, their main determinants, the long-term changes in the world economy, and the interaction between countries, regulatory systems and firms. One of the major objective of the course is to understand why, during the last decades, some countries have grown faster than others, reducing as well their main sources of vulnerability. Since 1950, 13 developing or emerging economies have grown at an average rate of 7% a year or more for 25 years or longer and have continued to grow, also during the recent economic and financial crisis. These rapid transformations have changed completely the patterns of development and the relationships between developed and developing/emerging countries.

The course will mainly focus on the microeconomic and macroeconomic dimension of development and will be organized around two main parts. In the first, after having scrutinized traditional and more recent theories of economic development to provide student with a background, attention will be given to those identified as the main factors affecting growth in developing countries. In the second part, more specific focuses will be devoted to the more recent developments related to: i. the role of larger emerging economies in the global economic order, ii. the rapid changes in the international production system, iii. the role of development policies in promoting growth.

Sample Syllabus

 

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra and Calculus with a grade of C or higher or passing placement exam.

This course is only open to Economics Policy Majors and prospective majors.

This course introduces calculus for real valued functions of a single real variable and of several real variables. In particular, it shows how calculus can be used to solve optimization problems for these functions, including constrained optimization problems which can be solved by substitution. A substantial number of economic examples will be analyzed during the course.

 

 

 

London

Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Mathematics for Economics II (MATH-UA 212). Restriction only for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: not open to seniors.

Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211).

Not open to NYU Stern students.

The aim of the course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of the core concepts and methods of microeconomics. The course can serve as a foundation for more advanced undergraduate electives which require a microeconomics background. Students will develop their understanding of economic models specified in standard mathematical and/or game theoretic terms. Course content includes core topics of consumption, production, and decision-making by firms (both with and without market power) as well as the analysis of market failure due to public goods and externalities. The core also includes an introduction to decision making under conditions of uncertainty. These topics are analyzed more deeply and more rigorously than in introductory principles courses. Depending on time available, the course will cover a selection of further topics. These include some or all of: asymmetric information, general equilibrium, and behavioral economics. Because this course caters to the policy concentration stream, the level of mathematics is somewhat lower than it would be on the theory concentration, and the course will make extensive use of diagrams and stress the intuition of results. Nevertheless, intermediate microeconomics is rigorous and analytical. The calculus prerequisite is there for a reason and students will need to be familiar with basic differentiation, including partial differentiation. While the level of mathematics is not advanced, all students of intermediate microeconomics must be prepared for some mathematical analysis. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10). Restriction only for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: not open to seniors.

Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1), Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211).  

Why did the global economy find itself on the edge of a precipice in 2008, why did free markets fail so spectacularly, how well did governments and central banks cope, are we out of the woods? This course seeks to equip students with the basic analytical and practical skills necessary to begin answering such fundamental questions.

As an academic discipline, Macroeconomics has been heavily criticised in recent years: for not predicting the 2007-onwards credit crunch; for using simplistic, out-of-date models; for ignoring data that challenged stylised theories; and for failing to acknowledge that economic theory has little to offer without a clear, socio-political and historical context.

Our principal objective is to counter some of these criticisms, not by reinventing the wheel but rather by introducing key contemporary issues and seeing what insights we can gain by applying relevant and appropriate macro analysis. A core objective of this course is to show that Macroeconomics, carefully and intelligently deployed, can offer helpful insights for addressing society’s key challenges in the 21st century. 

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

The principal characteristics of the financial system and its current challenges; derivatives, financial innovation and the banking industry; money supply and monetary policy; bonds, equities and interest rates; financial supervision and regulation; pricing of financial securities and balanced portfolios; foreign exchange and how currency markets impact policy and asset choices; international policy co-ordination; banking crises and reform programmes.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) or equivalents.

This course focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department’s more advanced course in ECON-UA 324. The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Sample Syllabus (Please note that there are different sections of this course which use different text books. Please wait to hear from NYU London or your Professor about which book to buy. Do not base your purchase off of this sample syllabus)

Prague

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisite: Precalculus (NYU MATH-UA 9)

Focuses on the economy as a whole (the "macroeconomy"). Begins with the meaning and measurement of important macroeconomic data (on unemployment, inflation, and production), then turns to the behavior of the overall economy. Topics include long-run economic growth and the standard of living; the causes and consequences of economic booms and recessions; the banking system and the Federal Reserve; the stock and bond markets; international exchange rates and the impact of global economic events; and the role of government policy.

Sample Syllabus

NOTE: This course does not count for NYU Economics major credit.

The course deals with issues of transition from socialism to market economy and democracy in Central and Eastern Europe. It will cover topics ranging from the characteristic properties of classical socialism: political structure, ownership, co-ordination mechanisms, growth pattern, investment, prices, wages and employment in the system. The course then discusses inducements for reforms and experiments with market socialism. The main focus is issues of transition: political transformation, economic stabilization, privatization, corporate governance issues, changes in employment, income distribution and social security. The course analyzes political aspects of the transition process and identifies the main political constraints of economic decisions taken by transition countries. Finally, the course focuses on the accession of transition countries to the European Union, on its economic and political aspects. Basic principles of EU economic policies are discussed and framed into the transition process of Central European countries.

Sample syllabus

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 10 or ECON-UA 11, Intermediate Microeconomics or Microeconomics (Theory).

The subject of the course is to describe one of the most profound changes to take place in the history of the world economy - the rapid change from centrally planned economies to market economies throughout what used to be known as "the Soviet block". Although some reforms in some countries began much earlier, the true transition began in most Central and Eastern European countries roughly in 1990. This means that scholars and researchers are only now beginning to have the data and a sufficient distance needed to study and analyze the transition process.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

Prerequisite: Economic Principles I & II (ECON-UA 1 & ECON-UA 2) or equivalents

This course will examine the global financial crisis of 2007-2009, including the hypotheses underlying the origins and propagation of the crisis, and the policy responses that occurred along a variety of dimensions. Topics covered will range from the role of financial institutions (banking and shadow banking) and capital markets, an overview of emergency measures taken, including monetary and fiscal policy measures, and regulatory reform, both domestic and abroad. Other financial crises, such as the U.S. depression of the 1930s, the Mexican financial crisis of 1994-1995 and the Asian financial crisis of 1997-1998, will also be examined.

Sample Syllabus (PDF)


English

London

On Christmas Day, 1764 Horace Walpole published The Castle of Otranto, the very first Gothic novel. The Gothic flourished especially in the nineteenth century, creating a whole vocabulary of new creatures and landscapes and two of the great books of the genre: Frankenstein And Dracula. This course concentrates on the great works of Gothic which are central to an understanding of literature, film, early Romanticism and popular culture. Specialising on the works of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we will also explore how those texts were reinvented for film and what new elements were added in the twentieth century. Using a selection of texts and using a variety of approaches from the historical to the post modern and the feminist to queer theory we will explore the multifarious levels of meaning in Gothic texts as well as looking at narrative strategies and a variety of themes including the political and revolutionary, the erotic and the exotic, the Promethian and the undead, the role of religion, the role of women, the Wandering Jew and the 'mock' medieval.

This course features authors and texts with significant literary ‘afterlives’ that have persisted to the contemporary moment – Shakespeare, Jane Austen and Charles Dickens to name a few – with a view towards encouraging students to seek out the origins of iconic narratives. As such, this course allows students to engage at length with some of the most beloved and renowned authors in British literary history, but it also challenges them to reconsider preconceptions they may hold about certain authors or texts. Along with a few novels, we shall complement each literary era with relevant poetry, and we will also read three plays, including Harold Pinter's No Man's Land, which we will then see performed live in London. Other excursions include the Dickens House Museum and the Geffrye Museum.

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $495 in Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester).

The course examines the main features of modern drama from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Each week there is a theatre visit to see plays from the period in a number of different venues across the city: for example, the National Theatre, the Royal Court, selected West End houses, non-theatre spaces converted for performance, and site specific locations. The productions are chosen to illustrate the immense variety of work produced in theatre during the twentieth century and current today. They also provide excellent examples of contemporary techniques in theatre making, ranging from interpretations of traditional dramas and comedies, new writing, physical theatre, musicals, cross media pieces, and other alternative forms. Significant aspects of modern drama are also considered in class through examples on DVDs, examination of critical reviews, and analysis of additional texts where appropriate. 

Sample Syllabus

This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film). We will also examine the texts in relation to issues such as gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals.

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $263 in Fall 2016 and Sppring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester).

This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors' companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet. 

Sample Syllabus

The nineteenth century was the great age of the English novel. This course charts the evolution of the form during this period, exploring texts by major authors including Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy. Close attention to narrative, questions of mimesis and publishing practices will combine with the exploration of a range of significant contemporary discourses relating to shifting conceptions of gender, sexuality, religion, science, class, and race. These varied contexts will help us to consider formal, stylistic and thematic continuities as well as discontinuities and innovations. Taking advantage of our local surroundings, we will also explore changing representations of London and trace the enduring legacy of this period in the twenty-first-century city.

Sydney

This course is an introduction to the literatures of Australia, New Zealand and the Asia-Pacific region, with a focus on Indigenous, migrant and diasporic writing. In addition to major texts from Australia and New Zealand, we will also encounter a range of works from Singapore, Hawaii and other Pacific islands. Some questions we will tackle include: How have the cultural, historical, and economic processes of colonialism, diaspora and migration connected and shaped this diverse region? How have different authors addressed these processes in their literary works? How have issues of race and indigeneity been central to various discourses of nationalism? What is the place of these issues in early and more contemporary postcolonial literary works in English? What particular roles have Australia and New Zealand, as colonial powers in their own right, played in the region? Finally, what can the latest generation of migrant writing from Australia show us about new forms of interconnections across the globalising Asia-Pacific?

Students in this course will examine novels, poetry, films and theoretical texts to develop their critical thinking, reading and writing skills. Along the way, they will gain a solid grounding in the concepts of post-colonialism, race, diaspora, indigeneity, nationalism and multiculturalism.

Sample Syllabus

 

 

 

This seminar launches a collective experiment, a commitment to work, play, analyze, respond, and create as a reader/writer: but what might this mean? Reading: processing, decoding, discerning, pronouncing, scanning, skimming, erasing, paraphrasing, sounding, critiquing, imitating, emulating, creating, destroying, romancing, absorbing, excreting, collaging, cutting, annotating. Reading: it’s not obvious. Nor writing. Reading-as- a-writer: reading for something, with something, against something, across something. That something will usually but not always be a text. “Reading” will itself be interrogated, along with writing: what forms, modes, codes, and affects might we activate? Why and when?

This is a class in creative as well as critical reading, which will occasionally flow into creative/critical writing. We will consider modes of reading—close reading, mid-range reading, distant reading. We will repeatedly review and perhaps en route revise what we bring to our reading experiences, and to these experiences when we summon ourselves as writers.This seminar aims to strengthen your capacities for pattern recognition—i.e. sophistication about genre, style, and mode. We will explore how writers compose texts and at times how they decompose texts, genres, expectations.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

Berlin

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

Sample Syllabus

Shanghai

This course explores the environmental situation in China by examining both the very serious environmental challenges that China faces and the governance system(s) that exist in China for dealing with those challenges. In order to assess these challenges and systems, the course introduces a comparative dimension – looking at not only the Chinese system, but the American system as well, examining the environmental challenges and governance system of the United States, as well as the broader context within which China and the U.S. together constitute the two primary sources of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Is it possible to compare the American and Chinese systems? Can concepts of governance and assessment be translated between the two systems? What can China learn from the U.S.? What can America learn from China? Will the profound differences in our political and economic systems make environmental cooperation impossible, leading inevitably to conflict? Will globalization and technological innovation lead to healthy competition and cooperation to address common problems?

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

In this hybrid reading / writing class, we will explore environmental journalism from an Australian perspective. We will meet for a weekly in-class seminar, except for three to four weeks during the session set aside for field trips. Our field trips will give us the opportunity to experience environmental issues first-hand, meet people, gather story ideas and find local Australian context for our own writing. Guest speakers will join us occasionally to further explore key issues. Our in-class seminars will briefly introduce key journalism concepts and techniques to those new to journalism and reinforce and further develop these skills for experienced journalism students. During each in-class seminar we will also discuss set readings, and explore the environment beat, reading stories that have been reported in Australia and around the world. We will consider work that explores this journalistic tradition, its forms and its themes and the place it takes in the new media world. Drawing our inspiration from great writers, we will find our own stories, our own voices and learn to tell our own tales. We will work on a class blog and each student will produce a news story which may be published on the blog, and a feature story for publication either on our blog or in an Australian or international print or digital outlet.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. We will explore what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. We will consider how to measure sustainability and discuss the effectiveness of sustainability indicators. We will examine governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. We will also highlight the transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future.

Sample syllabus (PDF)


European Studies

Berlin

This course aims to provide an overview of the history, structure, functions, processes and current issues of European integration with a particular emphasis on the role of Germany both as to its influence on the EU and the Europeanisation of its own political system. European Integration is understood in this course to mean the co-operation, which EU Member states organize in the framework of the Union, and the direction in which this co-operation evolves. For these twenty-eight diverse countries, integration constitutes an increasingly essential component and extension of their own state structure. It permits them to conceive of, to decide on, and to carry out a growing number of important state tasks in common, and under the roof of the European Union. You will consider the milestones of postwar European integration. You will analyze the institutions, procedures and instruments of European integration as well as major EU policies and the distribution of competencies between Member States and Union. And you will get acquainted with theoretical models to explain the nature of European integration up to the present.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

The course examines significant moments in the development of Europe’s and America’s notions and images of one another from the 18th century to the present. The in-depth discussion will be based upon historical documents and cultural texts with equal attention to sources from America/the US and Europe/Germany in an effort to explore and evaluate the major theoretical and rhetorical paradigms (and the shifts therein) informing the perceptions as well as cultural constructions of the “other” past and present. Moreover, the course will investigate and evaluate recent manifestations of Anti-Americanism and analyse the ideological and cultural coordinates of current anti-American concepts in Europe/Germany as well as concepts of Europe as a socio-cultural model for the 21st century. In conclusion, the politics of the current US-Administration will be discussed in terms of their impact on transatlantic relations as well as on dealing with global challenges, particularly in the Middle East.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus

Paris

The purpose of this seminar on European integration is to give the students a few keys in understanding what the European Union is and how it works; how it affects every day policies of the member states as well as the life of European citizens; what kind of world actor the EU is or might become; what political consequences the current financial crisis might have for the EU. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

This course investigates the history, the structure and the inner logic and working of European integration from the end of the Second World War to present day. It will provide students with an overview of the political institutions, the member states and the current developments of the European Union while focusing on the paramount role played by France throughout the years. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

This course will try to put European security into the context of today’s world: from the collapse of communism and dissolution of the Warsaw Pact through the years of wars in the former Yugoslavia, the wars on former Soviet territory, and to the stateless threat of terrorism today. But study limited to Europe would be pointless; the Old Continent is no longer the prime player on the planet. Therefore a series of related topics and areas will also be discussed: U.S. military might (especially compared to the European armed forces); the situation in adjacent regions (North Africa, Middle East, Russia and Ukraine) and its implication for Europe; and the new types of terrorism. 

Sample syllabus

The overriding goal of this course is to reach an understanding of the key strategic issues facing Europe today and how they impact on the political economy of the region. We will track how Europe has reached the present critical juncture in its history and consider where it is headed, including the options available to European policy-makers amid the on-going crisis in the Eurozone. To this end, we will examine the key events of the 19th and 20th centuries that led to the foundation of the EU and have shaped contemporary Europe. At the same time, we will consider Europe’s relations with the US as today’s sole superpower, the challenges posed by the resurgence of China and Russia and Europe’s role as a major player in the resource-rich Eurasian continent, where a new round of great power competition is unfolding.

The course draws largely on political economy but also on history, international relations and geopolitics. It aims to raise questions and stimulate discussion rather than provide clear-cut answers.

Sample syllabus

Individual or minority revolt against for the time being prevailing majority position, religious interpretation or political rule is an important but often forgotten part of history. Modern Political Dissent class covers this phenomena combining findings from several fields like psychological response to extreme situations, modern history, political and communication theory, art and culture in opposition against perceived injustice and case studies and analyses of important examples of modern political dissent. From interpretation of holocaust or torture survival ordeal and Stockholm syndrome students are led to analyze the context – both psychological and historical – in order to search for possible remedies. Conditions that made totalitarian ideologies so widely acceptable are studied within the context of thought reform and cult manipulations. Works of Robert J.Lifton, Stanley Milgrams and Phillip Zimbardo are used to explain importance of individual responsibility versus obedience to authority. Role modeling and differentiation in communicating minority or dissent values to majority society give a possibility to adjust complex strategies for change.

Sample syllabus

This course will concentrate on the analysis of the pursuits of democracy in Western Europe. Firstly, the conception of Europe will be explored in its historical perspective and different perceptions: territorial, political, spiritual, cultural etc. Secondly, the characterizing social cleavages of Europe will be introduced: territorial, economic, religious, national, ethnic etc. Furthermore, we will discuss how these cleavages get expressed in the formation of different social interests and lead to the organization of interests groups, political parties and NGOs. Thirdly, turning towards the institutional structures of West European parliamentary democracies, we will address the existence of political party systems, as well as the executive and legislative powers represented by government and parliament. Fourthly, we will explore the rules and outcomes of different electoral systems, which ensure regular rotation of political elites at power – however, under different principles. Finally, we will assess the enrichment of the classical models of government in Western Europe, which have in the last 20 years been supplemented by additional players participating in the decision making processes on different levels (local, regional, national and European) – leading to new political conceptualization of ‘governance’. Also, while European states remain core units of European integration, they are also influenced by the EU, leading to their Europeanization. The new challenges facing Western Europe, such as globalization, continuing European integration, regionalization, restructuring of social welfare systems and the issues of identity, will be discussed. 

Sample syllabus


Expressive Cultures (College Core Curriculum / Morse Academic Plan)

Sydney

How has Australian cinema engaged with significant and often contested historical, political and cultural events in the nation’s past? The films in this course offer critical perspectives on the history of colonisation in Australia; the legacies of the Stolen Generations; the controversies surrounding Australia’s role in World War One; as well as Australia’s relationships with its Pacific Asian neighbours. We will focus on films that have marked significant shifts in public consciousness about the past such as Gallipoli (1981), Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002) and Balibo (2009). We will also draw on films that have employed innovative narrative and aesthetic strategies for exploring the relationship between the past and the present such as Ten Canoes (2006) and The Tracker (2002). Throughout the course, students will develop their understanding of the basic methods and concepts of cinema studies. In particular, students will develop a critical vocabulary for analysing how filmmakers have approached the use of memory, testimony, re-enactment, researched detail, allegory and archives across a diverse range of examples.

Sample Syllabus


Film and Television

Prague

The goal of the course is to give students picture of main streams in development of Czech filmmaking from its origins to present times. The phenomena will be explained in the international context regarding the influences and original innovations in style and in national economical and political relations. The major interest will represent new tendencies from “velvet revolution” of 1989 till contemporary situation. Lectures will be supplied by screening of characteristic excerpts from films, eventually of entire movies.

Sample syllabus


French

Paris

Open to students in both Programs I & II

This workshop allows students the opportunity to sing their way to a discovery of French language and culture. Students expand their vocabulary and improve their pronunciation through performance while learning about the history and context of this popular art form. The workshop culminates in a performance at the end of the semester. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students in both Programs I & II

In this workshop students have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of phonetics and improve their pronunciation and comprehension of spoken French. Through listening exercises, poetry, and role-plays, students will work on articulation, rhythm and intonation. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students in both Program I & II

Students may work in a variety of realms such as drawing, painting, photography and/or folding. During the course the students will have the opportunity of creating alongside the professor in her art studio.
Students wishing to carry out a personal creative project are most welcome to develop it during the art classes. However, students choosing this must imperatively have proof prior to beginning art classes.
The course includes visits to museum to explore the wide range of subjects and materials available to contemporary artists, and concludes with the exhibition/ theatre performance in a prestigious Parisian venue at the end of the semester. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This workshop is both an active language and literature course, destined to introduce French poetry to students. In this course we will read poetry out loud in order to show how poetry is founded on rhythm and the repetition of phonetic and syntactic elements. This pragmatic approach will not only allow students to improve their pronunciation, but also to understand the poetic genre, the quality of poets’ language, their interest in etymology, metaphor, imagery, etc. Close readings, paraphrase and translations will allow students to considerably improve their mastery of the French language so that they in turn will be able to produce poetry of their own. This course will help them to integrate the phonic, rhythmic and musical dimensions of poetry, as well as learn about its various uses, from the intimate to historical testimonies. Conducted in French.

Presentation and systematic practice of basic structures and vocabulary of oral French through dialogues, pattern drills, and exercises. Correct pronunciation, sound placement, and intonation are stressed. For students with little or no command of French. Completes the equivalent of one year's elementary course. Textbook: Alors? Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 10 or FREN-UA 1-2. Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's elementary level and to others on assignment by placement test. Completes the equivalent of a year's intermediate level in one semester.

A continuation of FREN-UA 10, this course is designed to provide students that have already studied one year of French (or the equivalent thereof) with the remainder of the fundamentals of the French language and to give those students that have mastered the basics of French vocabulary, culture, pronunciation, and grammar the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of the French language and the cultures for which it is a vehicle. Conducted in French.

 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 11-12 or FREN-UA 20. Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's intermediate level and to others who have passed the proficiency examination but who wish to review their French in order to take advanced courses in language, literature, and civilization.

This course is designed to give those of you who have already begun to deepen your understanding of the French language and French and francophone cultures the opportunity to complete your fifth semester of French by mastering a fuller range of vocabulary, structures, pronunciation, and cultural information. This class will thus prepare you to tackle the classes at the advanced level and eventually to delve into more specialized literature and civilization courses. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

NYU Art History students: This course counts for Art History Elective credit.

This course aims to understand and appreciate the creativity and dynamism of the Parisian art scene today through an exploration of contemporary art in the capital. The course will focus on the diversity of resources provided by the city, with special attention to new artistic practices and loci of production, as well as the multiple actors involved, from artists themselves to private galleries to art critics and museum curators. Reference to major avant-garde art movements of the past such as dada, geometrical abstraction, surrealism and expressionism will also be made in order to better situate today’s artistic concerns. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

This course examines aspects of political and social change in France from the end of the French Revolution to the present day. Through an exploration of Paris neighborhoods, monuments and museums, we will look at how the city’s evolution has been inscribed on the urban landscape, and reflect on how history and national identity are imagined, produced and contested through the carving up of urban space. Major dates and events of French political history form the chronological backbone for this course, while class discussions are organized thematically from the perspective of social history and the history of ideas. Classes include walking tours and site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the notion of French culture through an analysis of French cinema. Placing films in their historical and cultural context, we consider how cinema provides a window on French society, while recognizing that they are cultural products specific to a particular historical moment. Social history, cultural archetypes and artistic creation will be some of the topics under consideration. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the crucial decade lasting from mid 1930s to the Liberation of France from German Occupation in 1944, while also going well beyond those chronological and geographical parameters. Opening with a discussion of the crises facing the French polity prior to World War Two, we will move on to explore the events, culture, politics and economics of the defeat of 1940, the Vichy regime and its relationship to Nazi Europe, the dynamics of resistance and collaboration, the deportation of Jews and other groups, the highly contested process of Liberation and retribution, and the wars of memory over the meaning of the wartime past. We shall analyze more particularly the impact of the violence of war upon children both in France and in Nazi-occupied Europe. Using secondary and primary texts, films and visual sources, as well as visits to the Paris sites, students will learn about the relationship of the past and the present in producing the history of this period as well as the methodological challenges of using witness accounts in reconstructing the past and will become competent critics and knowledgeable exponents of this essential stretch of French history and historiography.
Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus

This course allows students to discover “Theater of the absurd”, a theoretical and practical approach to theater born of the complex historical, literary, and philosophical context of the Second World War. We will analyze the characteristics of this type of theater which continues to influence avant-garde themes and esthetics. Students will perform excerpts from selected works with a focus on the absurdity of situations, de-structuring language, and corporal expression. The approach of the course is intellectual, physical and creative. Theater outings and projections will be included.  The principal works studied include: Ubu Roi d’Alfred Jarry, La Cantatrice Chauved’Eugène Ionesco et Huis Clos de Jean-Paul Sartre.

Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

In this course, we will explore the ways in which Paris plays a role in the representation of the subject. Through the study of novels and autobiographies by Breton, Hemingway, Stein, Duras, Modiano, de Beauvoir, and Baldwin, we will ask, what is the role of place in the imagining or invention of the self? How does the experience of a specific city, Paris, influence the formation of identity? How do these authors represent, or subvert, the notion of the ‘real’? Although the focus of this course is literary, we will also engage with major political, cultural, and artistic movements of the period, exploring the ways in which our writers negotiate history through their writings. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Please note that this course can be counted toward the Media, Culture, & Communication major. Should you choose to enroll in this course, please notify your MCC primary advisor. He or she will make sure this course is accurately reflected in your academic record.

This course provides students an overview of museum practices in France, ranging from the historical impetus for the creation of museums to the contemporary conditions that shape museum practice. Responsible for the collection and preservation of objects deemed valuable, museums shape the way we see history and the contemporary world. In Paris, museums that are central to Paris’s reputation as a city of art and culture are also the result of state intervention in the production, collection, and exhibition of works of art. This course will critically examine this link, looking at the motivations behind state support of artistic culture, and the extraordinary museums that resulted from this intersection of private collectors, public displays, and political agendas in France. Museums studied range from public institutions such as the Louvre to private collections such as the Musée Camondo, to the scientific and/or social role played by such museums as the Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and the newer Musee du Quai Branly and Cite Nationale de l’Histoire de l’Immigration. Focusing on critical debates in museum accession policies, provenance research, and repatriation claims, we will highlight the increasingly global ambitions of French museums, and the challenges of situating French culture in this increasingly international context. Conducted in English.

 Prerequisite: FREN-UA 30, or assignment by placement test, or approval of the director.

Assumes a mastery of the fundamental structures of French. May be taken concurrently with FREN-UA9105. Helps the student to develop vocabulary, to improve pronunciation, and to learn new idiomatic expressions. Introduction to corrective phonetics and emphasis on understanding contemporary French through a study of authentic documents; radio and television interviews, advertisements, spontaneous oral productions, etc. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

 

 Prerequisite: FREN-UA 30, assignment by placement test, or approval of the director.

This course is designed to help students to develop their vocabulary, further their mastery of grammar, and improve their ability to write informally and, more importantly, formally in French. There will be an emphasis on the understanding and production of sophisticated written French through a study of authentic documents such as newspaper articles and excerpts of longer works. There will also be considerable work on learning how best to proofread, edit, and rewrite written work. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 101, or assignment by placement test.

For students with relative fluency in French who wish to further strengthen their pronunciation and command of spoken French. Develops the skills presented in FREN-UA 9101 through an in-depth study of French phonetics (corrective and theoretical), and analysis of the modes of oral discourse in French. Emphasis is on understanding spoken French (modes of argument, persuasion, emotion, etc.) through analysis of authentic documents and development of student discourse in French. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 105 or assignment by placement test.

 

Aims to refine students' understanding of and ability to manipulate written French. Students practice summarizing and expanding articles from French magazines and papers and learn how to organize reports and reviews in French. Focuses on the distinction between spoken and written styles and the problem of contrastive grammar. Emphasis on accuracy and fluency of usage in the written language. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: FREN-UA 30 or assignment by placement test.

Use of drama and theatre techniques to help students overcome inhibitions in their oral use of language. Exercises and activities are designed to improve pronunciation, intonation, expression, and body language. Students work in collaboration with the professor, trained in the experimental methods of the French director Jacques Lecocq. This semester's focus will be to analyze and reenact excerpts from Molière’s plays.  Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Advanced Modern Credit.

This course examines the rise of realist and impressionist art in Europe within its cultural, historical and social contexts. The novelty of these two important movements is considered in relation to preceding artistic movements, namely neo-classicism and romanticism. Works by artists such as Delacroix, Courbet, Millet, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec are studied. The course includes both class lectures with slides and museum visits. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

 Art History students: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

In this course we explore the contemporary arts in France in their historic and social context. Beginning with current trends, we attempt to situate what’s new within a longer tradition of artistic production. Themes studied include the nature of the object, the monochrome, the body, the idea of nature, personal mythologies, the importance of light. The course includes visits to contemporary galleries and museums. Conducted in French. 

This course will examine contemporary and classical French theater from a new perspective. Far from scholarly chronological norms, we will use contemporary writings in order to better study their classical sources and inspirations. Theatre is an artistic discipline that is constantly in communication with its past. Theatre examines its roots in order to reorient and renew itself. Actors and directors reinvent the verses of Corneille, Moliere and Shakespeare so that they can better discover the writings of today. Dramaturgists reflect contemporary society, yet are always nourished by their predecessors so that they can either create a connection or break with them definitively. In this course we will examine great contemporary authors such as Jarry, Cocteau, Giraudoux, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, Koltes, Wajdi Mouawad, etc. As for the great classical figures, we will discuss such various authors as Sophocles, Corneille, Shakespeare and Racine. How did Jean-Paul Sartre use Corneille and Racine to give credence to his theatre? How was Cocteau or Giraudoux inspired by ancient theatre? What did Koltes take from classical tragedy in order to create his own dramas? This course will examine both theatrical writings as well as current productions in order to answer these questions. All the performances seen for the course as well as the works read will be discussed in oral presentations or written summaries. Conducted in French.

On December 28th, 1895, cinema was given its official characteristics by the Lumière brothers in Paris. If for over a century, the “Seventh Art” has been an essential element and a vehicle for French culture, the city of Paris has epitomized the evolution and contradictions of the French cinema industry. Focusing on the main tendencies in contemporary French cinema, we will ask the following questions: How do the French filmmakers depict the city of Lights, the City of Love, the City of Horror? How decisive a representation of Paris and its suburbs can be? Why do the images of Paris illustrate the history of French cinema? What do they show about French culture?

Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design Credit or Art History Elective Credit.

This course starts with a study of Gallo-Roman Paris (52-253 A.D.), highlighting archaeological artifacts, temples, thermal baths and theatres. Paris during the Middle Ages is then discussed, focusing on the problem of fortifications, as well as the rise of power of the absolute monarchy supported by the Church. We study the hôtels particuliers (large private residences) such as the Louvre, the Palace of the Ile de la Cité, etc. The arrival of 16th century Italian architectural styles, as illustrated by the Louvre, and their impact on the Parisian architectural landscapes is also discussed. In the modern period we examine the Parisian Arches (Louis XIV and Napoleon I), the urban works of Haussmann (1853-1870), the Eiffel Tower, the Alexander III Bridge with the Grand & Petit Palais and end with a discussion of 20th century architecture and the development of the Défense district. Conducted in French. 

Sample Syllabus

Introduction to French literature and thought in their historical dimension through a close study of selected masterpieces from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. Special emphasis on the aesthetic and intellectual currents that have shaped French literature. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

The purpose of this seminar on European integration is to give the students a few keys in understanding what the European Union is and how it works; how it affects every day policies of the member states as well as the life of European citizens; what kind of world actor the EU is or might become; what political consequences the current financial crisis might have for the EU. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

During the 20th century French language literature underwent a considerable change. Until 1945, only ONE French literature existed, (possibly prolonged by other francophone countries such as Belgium, Switzerland, and French Canada). In 1985, diversity finally seemed to reappear. Thus, the “Salon du livre de Paris” chose the central theme: “Ecrire les langues françaises.”
In this class we will concentrate on francophone novels from Africa that, other than their literary interests, approach questions of postcolonial politics. The objective is to discover and analyze the forms, styles, and themes these novels utilize that reveal a better understanding of the political and cultural issues of the 21st century.

 Conducted in French. 

The aim of this course is to give the students a broad view of french history since the end of Middle-Ages to the beginning of the 20th century. We will explain the main political events as well as the main cultural, artistic, and intellectual events. This course will be based on readings and on visiting museums and exhibitions. Conducted in French.

The major French novelists of the 20th century have moved the novel away from the traditional 19th-century concept. Proust and Gide developed a first-person-singular narrative in which the reader is participant. Breton uses the novel for a surrealist exploration. With Céline and Malraux, the novel of violent action becomes a mirror of man’s situation in a chaotic time and leads to the work of Sartre and Camus, encompassing the existentialist viewpoint. Covers Beckett’s sparse, complex narratives and Robbe-Grillet’s “new” novels. Novels are studied with respect to structure, technique, themes, language, and significant passages. Conducted in French. 

In this course we explore the multiple interrelations between art and literature, text and image, legibility and visibility. We consider art as it has been inspired by the written word (the Bible, mythology, epic poetry), art as inspired by and inspirational to literary works (Paul Valéry and Degas, Jean Genet and Alberto Giacometti), art as a response to and initiator of 20th century crises in representation, both written and visual (Cubism, Dada, Surrealism). Drawing on the multiple art resources in and around Paris, the course will urge us to reflect on the meanings and signs of language, in its many forms. Conducted in French. 

Sample Syllabus

The course aims to introduce students to contemporary French society through an examination of particular social groups and categories, with a focus on French youth and notions of gender. Through an exploration of contemporary issues and social movements, we will focus on how these groups have been constructed over time as historical and political categories with significant implications for social practice. Students will be encouraged to draw on resources in and around Paris as well as current events as an integral part of the course. Conducted in French. 

This course begins with an examination of the Algerian War (1954-1962), in order to consider its multiple ramifications for France and the Arab world. A long and terrible conflict, the “events” in Algeria, as they were called at the time, signaled the end of the French Empire. It brought down the 4th Republic and gave rise to one of the largest exoduses in modern history, with the departure of over a million people from Algeria to France following Algeria’s independence. The war has had major implications on French-immigrant relations, on the rise of the extreme right National Front in France, on the constitution of the French Jewish population, and on France’s involvement in other Middle Eastern conflicts. The history of French-Algerian colonial relations will also be examined. Conducted in French.


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Accra

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

This course is designed to prepare and support students undertaking an internship at an NGO in Ghana. This weekly seminar will introduce students to key concepts and debates in the field of development studies, as well as provide a space to raise questions and reactions to the internship experience. We will survey foundational and current texts that elaborate theories and functions of development, with a focus on the recent history of social and economic development approaches in Africa. Charting the transition from public to private development institutions, the readings will provide critical insights into rights-based approaches, gender equity and empowerment, sustainability, accountability, and the role of government.

In addition to exploring theoretical frameworks, we will devote significant class time to discussing student experiences at their internships. Students will identify and critically appraise different aspects of their organization: their mission, methodology, programs, relationship with various stakeholders, and philosophy of change. By bringing both academic and practical perspectives to bear on the role civil society plays in capacity-building and improvement of livelihoods, this course offers an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to the questions ‘What is development?’, ‘Who is the subject of development?’ and ‘Does it work?’ These questions cannot be answered by looking at theory or practices in isolation. By reflecting on how theory and practice shape each other, we will explore the rich history of debate and innovation in the field to deepen our understanding of the development context in Ghana.

This course will be the academic component of your internship experience. You will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on your internship as a way to further your academic goals. You will be asked to evaluate various aspects of your internship site, including but not limited to its mission, approach, policies, and the local, regional and international contexts in which it operates. You will also be asked to reflect critically on the state of the contemporary workplace and on ourselves as workers. You will be graded on the academic work produced in this course. 

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

This course studies modern and contemporary art and architecture through a strategic focus on the cities of Buenos Aires, New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City. We consider key artworks and architectural movements, approaching art history in urban, socio-historical and contextual terms. Emphasis is placed upon the city as a hub for the production and reception of art.

Cities are multifarious complexes of paradoxical elements, where rhythms of stasis and motion coexist. Every city absorbs creative interchange, while also triggering different types of transformation. Our speculations on the urban environment will bring up multiple questions that point back to and extend beyond the mere physical structure of the city, discovering arenas of social action. How does art exploits the characteristics of the metropolis? How is art distributed and consumed throughout the dense fabric of the city? We will explore art (primarily Latin American art) as a staging ground for the city, and the city as staging ground for art.

Developing comparative perspectives on Buenos Aires, New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City will illuminate the particularities of the places under investigation, albeit with reference to aesthetic trajectories as well as broader technological, economic, and social-political changes. New York is included in our selected network of Latin American cities, acknowledging its critical importance as a center of cultural experimentation where artists (including Latin American artists) share ideas in a global context.

Work in class will focus on both visual and textual analysis, employing images, manifestos and critical essays. The course includes a lively program of tours throughout Buenos Aires, visits to museums and private art collections, and conversations with guest contemporary artists.

Sample Syllabus

 

This is an introductory course in creative writing: prose is predominant, all genres are accepted, and no previous experience or expertise is required. The thematic focus starts with the condition of being a foreigner abroad, outside of one’s normal context or comfort zone. Many readings and writing exercises draw specifically on being in Buenos Aires and the Latin American region. Both writing exercises and reading combine to motivate and refine students´ work as they expand on the chronicler’s main subjects of place, people, and things.

Grounding one’s writing with fact/verisimilitude is key, as is detailed observation plus awareness of one’s own position in the greater context. Later details involve developing plot and dramatic tension (suspense), using diverse narrative points-of-view, and working with voice and character.

The course allows for flexibility in terms of genre: students may work with poetic discourse or with fiction or with non-fiction and even autobiography. All work will be discussed in accord with the criteria of literary writing (i.e. this is not a “journaling” or “blogging” class); hence, reading as well as writing exercises will focus predominantly on working with language in attentive, even innovative ways.

Critical analysis of published texts and of each others´ work are guided by the instructor to develop knowledge and application of literary critical criteria. The students give opinions and also intuitive sensations about the readings on issues like how a text is working, what strategies it is employing, and what effects it is producing thereby.

Sample Syllabus

Open to all students at NYU Buenos Aires.  Contact gallatin.global@nyu.edu for information.

This tutorial connects NYU students with students at Lenguitas, a vibrant public high school in Buenos Aires' Retiro neighborhood. NYU students will mentor high school seniors as they read, discuss and write about a well-known literary text. Conducted in English.

Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU, SPAN-UA 100 or equivalent)

This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primitive art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primitive and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200.

Mitos, Íconos y Tradiciones Inventadas seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course is structured in four topics. The first two weeks work as an introduction, and are devoted to ways of representing political authority in Latin America. The core of the course seeks to study and discuss three issues that are crucial for an understanding of our present: Violence in Latin America, Drugs and the Narco-machine, The Economy of Latin American Passion. Students will study these topics through a variety of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and songs.

Sample Syllabus

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Please visit the NYU Buenos Aires Internships Page for application information. Intermediate Spanish or above is strongly recommended.

This course requires a 90-minute weekly seminar and a minimum of 10 hours fieldwork a week at an approved internship field site. The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Argentine Civil Society. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency. The course provides you with tools to analyze your organization’s approach, its policies, its programs, and the political, legal, social, economic and cultural contexts in which it operates. Guest-speakers are invited to the seminar and case studies on Argentina civil society are discussed.  You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in Florence Program will be given registration priority for this course. This is a 7 week intensive course.  Specific course dates and meeting times  will be posted in ALBERT.

Italian fashion is famous internationally for its combination of quality and elegance. This course explores the development of fashion as an integral part of Italian identity. It looks at four historical moments or movements that played a significant role in developing that identity: Renaissance Florence under the de Medici, Mussolini’s mandate for Italian-based fashion, the post-war Italian film industry in the 1950s and 60s, and, today’s global fashion industry where the image of Italian style is one of quality, luxury and sexy elegance. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course may be counted towards the Cultural Specialization and Elective requirement for Comp Lit majors, with prior DUS approval.

This course focuses on literary representations of WWI and WWII. The online course pack includes examples of the political and military rhetoric to which Montale and Hemingway objected, historical essays and images (war photographs, recruitment posters, etc.), as well as the shorter texts we are studying. Central themes in the course are the concepts of political literature and historical fiction and the contrasting approaches and theoretical premises of classical realism and modernism. Among the supplementary sources available in the Villa Ulivi library are two good cultural histories on the subject: James Shehan Where Have All the Soldiers Gone and Mark Mazower Dark Continent. Other recurring issues will be gender, sexuality, religion, class politics, kitsch, psychoanalysis, rhetoric, and power.  

Sample Syllabus

London

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

This course offers a survey of key aspects of British fashion from 1500 to the present day, including womenswear, menswear, accessories, and more. We will examine selected features of producing, consuming, and representing dress, relating important shifts in fashion to historical developments in areas such as trade, economics, politics, and visual culture. Students will study examples of historical clothing as well as depictions of it, and become familiar with a variety of methodological approaches to its study. The majority of classes will take place in Bedford Square, London, and be formed of illustrative lectures, class activities, discussion of set readings, and student presentations. Each lecture is described in the syllabus and includes discussion questions, required as well as recommended readings, and recommended films. Several classes will take place on location, at museums and archives, and will explore important collections of British dress and of British everyday life and fashionable consumption.

Sample Syllabus

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in London Program will be given registration priority for this course.

The topic of clothing and adornment embraces a broad spectrum, from the need for protective covering to the desire for individual expression to the profit goal of international industries. Clothing epitomizes the way a fundamental necessity has been transformed by cultural construction---as well as desire and creativity---into a complex social indicator, a matrix of culture, class, gender identity and aesthetics. This course looks at the ways clothing and fashion are used by story tellers, in print and on film, from the ancient world to the modern as indicators of civilization, individuality, sensuality, polymorphous gender, guilt, and conspicuous consumption. In order to establish a critical grid and vocabulary with which to discuss fiction’s use of clothing/fashion our sources will also include readings in cultural studies, art, sociology, economics, fashion theory, and semiotics.

Sample Syllabus

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students accepted to this course must indicate on their Student Information Form that they want a Tier-4 General Student Visa; you will not be permitted to intern (paid or unpaid) in the UK without a Tier-4 visa.A Tier-4 visa costs a minimum of £310 GBP (approximately $527 USD), plus any applicable shipping and expedite fees.

Enrollment by permission only.  Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 16 hours fieldwork per week.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU. EUSA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus


Paris

This course examines aspects of political and social change in France from the end of the French Revolution to the present day. Through an exploration of Paris neighborhoods, monuments and museums, we will look at how the city’s evolution has been inscribed on the urban landscape, and reflect on how history and national identity are imagined, produced and contested through the carving up of urban space. Major dates and events of French political history form the chronological backbone for this course, while class discussions are organized thematically from the perspective of social history and the history of ideas. Classes include walking tours and site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

In this course, we will explore the ways in which Paris plays a role in the representation of the subject. Through the study of novels and autobiographies by Breton, Hemingway, Stein, Duras, Modiano, de Beauvoir, and Baldwin, we will ask, what is the role of place in the imagining or invention of the self? How does the experience of a specific city, Paris, influence the formation of identity? How do these authors represent, or subvert, the notion of the ‘real’? Although the focus of this course is literary, we will also engage with major political, cultural, and artistic movements of the period, exploring the ways in which our writers negotiate history through their writings. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

France and the U.S. have a habit of looking at one another as anti-models when it comes to discussions of assimilation and difference, “race,” identity, community and diversity. In this course, we explore this comparison as a productive means for re-considering these terms. Why is the notion of “ethnic community” so problematic in France? And why do Americans insist on the “homogeneity” of the French nation, even as, at various points throughout modern French history, France has received more immigrants to its shores than the United States? Through readings, film screenings, and site visits we explore the movements and encounters that have made Paris a rich, and sometimes controversial, site of cultural exchange. Topics include contemporary polemics on questions such as headscarves, the banlieue, the new Paris museums of immigration and “primitive” art, affirmative action and discrimination positive, historic expressions of exoticism, négritude, and anti-colonialism. Occasional case studies drawn from the American context help provide a comparative framework for these ideas. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to all NYU Paris students. For NYU Art History students this course counts for Art History Elective Credit.

This course investigates French art of the nineteenth-century, paying particular attention to the way in which historical factors informed artistic production during this period.  Beginning with David, Neo-Classicism and the French Revolution, we will move to the Napoleonic period, Romanticism, the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848, and trace the connection from Realism to Impressionism.  The second half of the course will examine the disparate movements spurred by Impressionism, collectively referred to as Post-Impressionism (including Neo-Impressionism, Synthetism, and Symbolism), and will culminate with the rise of Art Nouveau at the end of the century.  Throughout, we will interrogate how social forces (including politics, gender, race, religion, etc.) influenced the manner in which “Modern” art was produced and understood in nineteenth-century France. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

The course will examine the nature and significance of civil resistance in Central and Eastern Europe in the 20th century in a transversal, multi-disciplinary way. By studying literature, art and film we will operate in a space between modern history, political science, literature and film studies and psychology. In Central and Eastern Europe, the questions activists and artists never stopped asking were why authoritarian societies developed from ideals that seemed fair and peaceful?; what the purpose and limits of free creation were and whether ideas still mattered? People involved in civil resistance took powerfully practical steps which led to real consequences for them and finally undermined the regimes. All this is marvelously reflected in literature, art and film production that is today fully available.

In order to reinforce the point that the issues we are examining have meaning across regions and times, we will work thematically rather than chronologically. In this course we will be mixing approaches to how we explore the issues. In addition to traditional lecturing, there will be reading, videos and films. We will invite people who can talk personally about some of the issues and we will do field trips within Prague – the city that experienced liberal democracy, Nazism and Communism in only one century. Where necessary we will take a flexible approach in order to be able to take advantage of persons and events who might enrich the course being available in the semester.

Sample syllabus

This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to discuss and question the identity of specific nations in European space, which has always been a fascinating crossroad of ideas and ideologies as well as the birthplace of wars and totalitarian systems. The course will cover masterpieces of Russian, Hungarian, German, Polish and Czech cinematography, focusing on several crucial periods of history, in particular WWII and its aftermath, showing moral dilemmas of individuals and nations under the Nazi regime as well as revealing the bitter truth of the Stalinist years.Students will be exposed to brilliant and often controversial works of film art focusing on moral dilemmas of individuals under the stressful times of history. Participants of this course will thus map the European space through the means of film trying to analyze the individual approach to historical events while getting a general picture of Europe in its crucial periods of history - and last but not least learn to appreciate European film art.

Sample syllabus

Individual or minority revolt against for the time being prevailing majority position, religious interpretation or political rule is an important but often forgotten part of history. Modern Political Dissent class covers this phenomena combining findings from several fields like psychological response to extreme situations, modern history, political and communication theory, art and culture in opposition against perceived injustice and case studies and analyses of important examples of modern political dissent. From interpretation of holocaust or torture survival ordeal and Stockholm syndrome students are led to analyze the context – both psychological and historical – in order to search for possible remedies. Conditions that made totalitarian ideologies so widely acceptable are studied within the context of thought reform and cult manipulations. Works of Robert J.Lifton, Stanley Milgrams and Phillip Zimbardo are used to explain importance of individual responsibility versus obedience to authority. Role modeling and differentiation in communicating minority or dissent values to majority society give a possibility to adjust complex strategies for change.

Sample syllabus

The course is focused on exploring Franz Kafka’s work – stories, novels, diaries and letters – in the context of fin de siècle Prague and the birth of modernism. We will take a closer look at the cultural and social context of Central Europe (literature and the arts, but also the Modernist architecture of Adolf Loos, Simmel’s sociology of the metropolitan life, Freud’s analysis of the unconscious, Brentano’s psychology, the resonance of Nietzsche’s philosophy, or the emergence of new media like phonograph and silent film) in the first two decades of the 20th century. In addition, we will discuss the adaptations of Kafka’s work and its impact on later art, fiction and film (Borges, Welles, Kundera, Roth, Švankmajer). The topics discussed through Kafka’s writings and other related works include: man and metropolis, family, estrangement, authorship, time, writing and media, travelling, territories and identities, languages, animals, art and pain. We will be especially interested in how these phenomena transform when represented in and through the medium of literary fiction.

Sample syllabus


Central Europe is where West meets East. Some writers revel in this geographically liminal space, some long to free themselves from it, and some are conflicted in their feelings. The remarkable diversity of literary representations of the region has helped shape its culture, history and politics. In this course, students will study the work of prominent Czech, Pole, Slovene and Hungarian writers who have influenced people’s understanding of the region. Authors to be studied may include Václav Havel, Franz Kafka, Imre Kertész, Barbara Korun and Czeslaw Milosz. 

Shanghai

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Application information available here. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite. 

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

In this class students are encouraged to consider the intersectional environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) that they interact with and within, and how their sensibilities differ living away from home to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing. We will engage with a diverse range of readings – featuring many Australian authors – and discuss technical elements and affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Weeks are devoted to crafting the short story and poetry. Students will complete weekly ‘microfiction’ homework exercises based upon images they take or find, and participate in in-class writing exercises, all of which will contribute to the writing journal submitted with the final work. The class emphasises the importance of embodied interaction with the city through a field trip using ‘The Disappearing’ – a downloadable app featuring over 100 site-specific poems spanning a ‘poetic map’ of Sydney, created by The Red Room Company. Students will think about the possibilities of marrying new technologies with writing as they navigate using poems as landmarks. Students workshop their drafts during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique. This takes the form of a discussion in-class and students are required to submit written critical feedback on their classmates’ drafts in an online forum. At the end of the course students will have the opportunity to showcase their work at a reading night to the rest of the NYU Sydney student body and invited faculty.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

 

 

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

Can be counted for SCA-UA Internship credit (government and non-profit placements only).  Can also be counted for Politics major credit (internship with domestic policy focus only)

The seminar is designed to complement the internship fieldwork experience. In it we explore many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Students who secure an internship through or with the assistance of NYU Washington, DC must confirm their spot in the program and enroll in the internship class in order to accept the internship. Students are required to pursue 10 hours/ week in their internships to earn course credit; however NYU Washington, DC advises that students pursue ~20 hrs/ week in internship commitments. If students elect to participate in an internship that exceeds the recommended number of hours, they may be advised to reduce their academic courseload. Students are highly encouraged to consult NYU Washington DC staff for assistance with these decisions.

PLEASE NOTE: Internships that take place in Maryland, regardless of whether credit is awarded for the experience, require that your school or department have a certificate of approval to operate in the state.  If you are interested in a placement in Maryland, please contact global.internships@nyu.ed before applying to the internship for more information.

Sample syllabus (PDF)


German Studies

Berlin

This is an introductory course to the language and culture of German-speaking countries for students with no knowledge of German. It focuses on the development of communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbook "Schritte International 1&2", in conjunction with current culture-rich supplemental materials, offers a balanced approach to developing your individual language competence.

Throughout your engagement with the German language you will also learn about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the first part of a four part German course. Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking  countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

This course continues your introduction to the language and everyday culture of German-speaking countries. You will expand your understanding of important vocabulary and customs as well as more advanced language structures and idioms. The focus of the course will continue to spoken communication and everyday language use, but there will also be increased attention to reading and writing assignments. Since the goals of communicative and grammatical competence are ultimately inseparable,students are guided towards using German as accurately as possible.

This course covers the second part of a four part German course. Together, these courses (Elementary I and II and Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

This is an intensive introductory course to the language and culture of German-speaking countries for students with no knowledge of German. The focus of the course will be on communication with emphasis on the use of German in real-life situations, as well as providing knowledge of grammar and vocabulary. At the end of the semester, students will have acquired all the skills usually obtained in the two semesters of Elementary German sequence.

Your engagement with German language will also include learning about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the first two parts of a four part German course. Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of one year of elementary language instruction and to others on assignment by placement examination.

Intermediate German I is the first part of a two-semester-long intermediate sequence. You will continue to study grammar, vocabulary and other aspects of language. The class is almost entirely taught in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening. During this course, you will engage with a large variety of topical subjects from German culture, lifestyle and history.

This course intends to create a balance between working with intellectually stimulating subjects and practicing the skills needed to communicate in a foreign language. Learning another language requires a great deal of commitment, diligence, discipline, and effort on the part of the student.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: GERM-UA 9003, Intermediate German I or equivalent.

Intermediate German II is the second part of a two semester intermediate sequence. You will continue to study grammar, vocabulary and other aspects of language. You will also learn about the cultural and historical context of the German language. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening. This course intends to create a balance between working with intellectually stimulating subjects and practicing the skills needed to communicate in a foreign language.

This course covers the fourth part of a four part German course. Together, these courses (Elementary I and II and Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that will enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work.

Sample Syllabus

In this intensive intermediate course you will continue to study grammar,vocabulary and other aspects of language. You will also learn about the cultural and historical context of the German language. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening. This course intends to create a balance between working with intellectually stimulating subjects and practicing the skills needed to communicate in a foreign language.
Throughout your engagement with the German language you will also learn about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the second two parts of a four part German course.Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intensive Intermediate you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

Conducted in German. Postintermediate - 100 level.

Conversation & Composition is designed for post-Intermediate students of German with a solid grasp of German grammar and vocabulary, who wish to extend their knowledge of the German language, history, and culture through reading, watching films, discussion, and writing. Conversation & Composition is a reading and writing intensive course. Emphasis will be placed on refining written expression and developing the ability to express, discuss, and argue opinions.
This course will give you an overview of recent German political, social and cultural history after 1945 and of the present. Focuses will be on the variant developments in East and West Germany until the fall of the wall and on life in Berlin today. What are the important incidents and changes in German culture and society after 1945? How has the city of Berlin developed since the fall of the wall? These, and similar questions, will accompany us throughout the semester. During the course of the semester, we will explore narratives, which are related to our topics from a variety of genres: narrative prose, newspaper/magazine article, TV/radio documentary, music, film, photo, and other visual material. The class is entirely taught in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening.

Sample Syllabus

Conducted in German. Postintermediate - 100 level.

Der Kurs führt in die Geschichte der deutschen Literatur vom 18. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart ein. Anhand repräsentativer Werke vermittelt er einen Überblick über die verschiedenen Epochen und Gattungen, erste literaturwissenschaftliche Fachbegriffe werden erläutert. Kontinuitäten und Brüche, die als signifikante Entwicklungslinien oder Zäsuren die Literaturgeschichte markieren, werden im historischen und gesellschaftlichen Zusammenhang diskutiert. Der Kurs wird durchgängig in deutscher Sprache unterrichtet.
Es ist das Ziel, in gemeinsamen close readings a) ein Verständnis für die jeweiligen Texte und ihre politischen, kulturellen und sozialen Kontexte zu erarbeiten und b) die Fähigkeit zur wissenschaftlichen Diskussion zu entwickeln. Gefördert wird dies auch durch kleinere spielerische Einheiten, in denen wir die Texte in die Gegenwart transferieren und so nach der Aktualität der Werke fragen.

The course provides an introduction into the history of German Literature from the 18th century until today. By reading representative texts, the student will receive an overview of various epochs and genres. In addition, basic terminology of literary studies will be explained. Continuities and disruptions, which influence the history of literature in significant ways, are discussed in their historical and social contexts. The class is taught entirely in German.
The course objectives are a) to develop an understanding of the texts and their political, cultural, and social contexts and b) to develop an ability of critical discussion through a close reading of literary works. This is also fostered by some playful teaching units, in which we transfer the texts into the present and investigate their current relevance.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin is one of the most well-known film cities in the world. This course wants to introduce you to the study of German cinema by looking at changing images of the city since the postwar period. The course will begin with an introduction to film analysis, giving special attention to the relationship between film and city. We will go on to discuss a number of influential productions from East, West and reunified Germany, and draw comparisons to other German as well as non-German city films. Through seminar discussions, reading responses, and critical essays, you will gain an understanding of how the cinema has engaged with the city of Berlin and its transformations since the end of the Second World War.

Sample Syllabus

Power and culture are intimately interwoven in the social history and the material substance of modern Berlin. This interdisciplinary course explores the changing historical contours of the keywords of Kultur (culture), Geist (spirit), Technik (technology), Bildung (education), Arbeit (work) and Macht (power) and contestations over their meanings. Through applying an interdisciplinary approach that integrates literature, film, art, architecture, and philosophy, we interrogate how meaning is made individually and collectively. We will look at how relationships between individual identities, state power, and social norms were shaped in the context of recurrent political and economic crisis and rupture and ask how changing local, national, supranational, and global contexts influence how meanings are made. Paying attention to possibilities and constraints for negotiating the terms of everyday life and for conforming or resisting, we will trace how Berliners made and make sense of their lives and the world they participate in shaping.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin is one of the most well-known film cities in the world. This course wants to introduce you to the study of German cinema by looking at changing images of the city since the postwar period. The course will begin with an introduction to film analysis, giving special attention to the relationship between film and city. We will go on to discuss a number of influential productions from East, West and reunified Germany, and draw comparisons to other German as well as non-German city films. Through seminar discussions, reading responses, and critical essays, you will gain an understanding of how the cinema has engaged with the city of Berlin and its transformations since the end of the Second World War.

Sample Syllabus

Power and culture are intimately interwoven in the social history and the material substance of modern Berlin. This interdisciplinary course explores the changing historical contours of the keywords of Kultur (culture), Geist (spirit), Technik (technology), Bildung (education), Arbeit (work) and Macht (power) and contestations over their meanings. Through applying an interdisciplinary approach that integrates literature, film, art, architecture, and philosophy, we interrogate how meaning is made individually and collectively. We will look at how relationships between individual identities, state power, and social norms were shaped in the context of recurrent political and economic crisis and rupture and ask how changing local, national, supranational, and global contexts influence how meanings are made. Paying attention to possibilities and constraints for negotiating the terms of everyday life and for conforming or resisting, we will trace how Berliners made and make sense of their lives and the world they participate in shaping.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sample Syllabus

This course addresses literary, cultural, and theoretical representations of Berlin and other big European cities such as Dresden and Paris. Accordingly, students will investigate different aspects of Berlin ranging from its cultural richness in the Weimar Period to the devastation of the city during World War II; from the division in the postwar period, which produced two separate literary systems, to polyphonic and transcultural texts after reunification. The course will focus on publications of canonical authors such as Alfred Döblin and Christa Wolf, but also confront the students with minority literature by Jewish and German-Turkish authors. In its theoretical approach, the course offers insights into new paradigms of cultural studies such as “spatial turn” or “urbanism” as well as seeking to enhance academic skills in the reflection of gender aspects. The corpus of readings covers different literary periods and genres from realism to postmodernism, from prose to plays and lyrics.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

In Elementary German I students will learn the basics of the language. The course is focused on conversational skills; by learning a simplified structure of German grammar in a clear and concise format, students will be encouraged to use the new language as often as possible. The first steps into the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) will be accompanied by an introduction to contemporary life and culture in German-speaking countries. At the end of the course students should be able to handle some essential structures of the (real-life functional) language and achieve a rough idea about the way how the German language works.

Sample syllabus

In Elementary German II students will continue to learn the basics of the language. Although the course introduces more complex grammatical concepts and is intended to enrich lexical knowledge, it focuses on the development of conversational ability. Students will grow more confident and more proficient while using various conversational strategies accompanied by a learning by doing attitude. Written assignments will support writing skills, which gradually are getting more important during the course. By acquiring these competencies and by understanding some aspects of contemporary German life and culture students should achieve an initial knowledge of the language.

Sample syllabus

Intermediate German I is intended to develop communication, writing, and argumentation skills beyond the basic level. Students learn more advanced features of the language and read longer and more-complex texts. Grammar of the basic level is reviewed and practiced as appropriate. The course focuses on building reading and writing skills while continuing to improve conversational abilities. Students will grow more confident and more proficient while discussing and presenting various general topics of modern life. On the basis of assorted passages and articles from various books, magazines, and newspapers students train to comprehend and to speak about present-day problems and issues of German-speaking countries. Film clips, literary excerpts, and fieldtrips enhance the cultural dimension of this course.

Sample syllabus

Intermediate German I is intended to develop communication, writing, and argumentation skills beyond the basic level. Students learn more advanced features of the language and read longer and more-complex texts. Grammar of the basic level is reviewed and practiced as appropriate. The course focuses on building reading and writing skills while continuing to improve conversational abilities. Students will grow more confident and more proficient while discussing and presenting various general topics of modern life. On the basis of assorted passages and articles from various books, magazines, and newspapers students train to comprehend and to speak about present-day problems and issues of German-speaking countries. Film clips, literary excerpts, and fieldtrips enhance the cultural dimension of this course.

Sample syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

Buenos Aires

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.  Advanced Spanish skills (beyond Intermediate II) recommended.

This course combines a seminar based weekly section together with intensive internships in businesses, NGOs or other organizations. The experiential part will consist of 10 weekly hours of work within a pre-arranged organization. The academic part is meant to assist students in getting the most from this experience and provide theoretical and methodological elements to critically examine their experiences. It weaves together research design and methods with an empirical and theoretical examination of recent social phenomena in Argentina. We will use selected themes and topics to explore theoretical perspectives and selected aspects of contemporary Argentine society. In parallel we will explore how to construct a research project, collect data and analyze its contents.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning introduces GLS students to Berlin with an intensive
program of cultural preparation followed by site-dependent research.
The course is divided into 3 blocks (12 sessions) plus 3 sessions for
introduction and student presentations:

a. Orientation
Mapping Berlin I–III

b. Education and Research
Students will be introduced to the educational system as well as to the
local research facilities. Discussions, readings and assignments will
also serve as a preparation for the site-specific projects over the
Spring term.

c. Cultural Preparation and Berlin Today
The sessions will offer a preliminary survey of historical, political,
cultural and social developments during the past century and in
contemporary Berlin: What factors have encouraged and impeded
Berlin's flourishing as a diverse metropolis? Tracing developments
through 20th-century Berlin, the seminars will help to understand the
City’s contemporary debate about history and commemoration.
Special attention will also be paid to current questions of urbanization
and migration. Sessions will largely take place in situ, in locations of
contention and debate.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning I includes both classroom instruction and community experience (whenever practicable, individual community experience).  the principle goal of Experiential Learning I is immersion in the current and historical character of the site.  Classroom instruction provides an interdisciplinary perspective on local, national and global forces that have shaped the character of life in the Italian city.

Sample Syllabus

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in literature, music, and the visual and performing arts from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on global developments in culture. The course covers such literary works as; A Grain of Wheat, the poetry of Adrienne Rich, and;Crime and Punishment; films like;The Battle for Algiers; the art of Picasso and Hokusai; and musical works by Stravinsky and Ali Akbar Khan.

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in philosophy, theology, history, and political science from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on major world discourses about the nature of human identity and society through a comparative study of seminal texts. The course includes such works as The Communist Manifesto,The Wretched of the Earth, and Orientalism.

 

Madrid

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

This course has a strong emphasis on place-based learning methods.  This course consists of two components during the fall semester.  The first part will be an introduction to Spanish society and the second will focus on research methods to facilitate the experiential learning process in both the fall and spring semesters.

Sample Syllabus

Paris

Open to Global Liberal Studies Juniors only.

This is a full-year course divided over two semesters. The first semester course is designed to give students a broad overview of contemporary French society and its institutions while at the same time provide insight into the actual workings of such institutions on the ground. Topics covered include the institutions of the 5th Republic, the functioning of the welfare state, French cultural policy, the organization of local politics, urban issues, and immigration. Frequent site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Shanghai

This course aims to complement and enhance the internship experience. Students will learn to critically examine their fieldwork in order to reflect upon what their particular, concrete experience reveals about life in contemporary Shanghai.

Tel Aviv

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning I includes both classroom instruction and community experience (whenever practicable, individual community experience). the principle goal of Experiential Learning I is immersion in the current and historical character of the site.

Sample Syllabus


Global Programs

Accra

The required course, Global Orientations: History, People and Cultures of Ghana will commence in Spring 2014.  NYU Accra students will not be enrolled in a formal Global Orientations course during Fall 2013 but will be in future semesters.

Berlin

This course offers a survey of Modern Germany (its history, politics and culture) and an investigation of how Germany's past, always very present, shapes responses to contemporary challenges and new opportunities. The overview investigates not only the country's experiments with authoritarianism - the experiences of mass murder, war and division - but also its emergence as a democratic leader, in the arts and human rights, and as Europe's power broker. We examine questions of citizenship and diversity, Germany's 'special' responsibility as a leader in Europe, the role of the Holocaust in State governance, Berlin's status and development as an industrial and cosmpolitan metropolis, and new avenues for German identity. We ask how these histories have made today's Berlin Europe's most exciting capital - a nexus of youth culture and the interational arts scene - and Germany a vanguard of the arts, sustainable energy, technical development and global politics.

Sample Syllabus

 

Buenos Aires

The purpose of this class is to introduce the students into key concepts and issues of Contemporary Argentina and its geopolitical context, e.g. Latin America and the World. Through an approach to local, cultural, and political issues the course will address how Argentina interacts with the region and the world, and how this international context impacts on Argentina. The emphasis will be on addressing a number of concepts that are necessary to understand Contemporary Argentina, politics in Buenos Aires and their relationship with the world. Spanish spoken in the Rio de la Plata region will be taught from a pragmatic approach, encouraging the learning and use of local expressions and Argentine Spanish, including political expressions used in the media, political activism and the everyday life of porteños –the inhabitants of Buenos Aires.

Sample Syllabus (PDF)

 

Florence

This course provides students with a shared study-away experience at NYU Florence, engages them in the intellectual life of our site, and prepares them for their course work by giving them a basic foundation in the history and culture of Italy. Students also benefit from basic instruction in Italian language; this instruction is designed to supplement their formal language courses and to enable them to function in their new surroundings.

 

London

We often hear that Britain is a global country and London is a global city, but what does this mean? In recent years Britain has undergone striking changes in its social makeup, political outlook and cultural activities. Rapid change also brings tensions around housing, the National Health Service and education all of which are increasingly facing pressures from immigration, larger numbers of unemployed and the economic squeeze. The most recent census suggested Polish was the second is spoken language in Britain. So what is happening and why and how does it affect you as a visiting student?

Global Orientation: British Culture is intended to introduce students to ideas formed by global and local issues and focus on concerns regarding politics, the media, migration, the free market, foreign policy, cultural homogeneity and democracy that are the keys to modern British national identity.
The course in based around a series of lectures and talks by prominent speakers from British politics, culture, economics and the arts, and incorporates various optional excursions into London to see some of what is being talked about in action.

Sample Syllabus

Sample 2

Madrid

Global Orientations aims to put you (students) in direct contact with Spain, so that you have the opportunity to get to know and engage in Spanish culture and language, regardless of your level of Spanish. This workshop will help you to be able to engage in Spanish culture and language by means of an active, practical and lively learning experience. During Orientation week and over the course of the semester, you’ll attend sessions with NYU Madrid professors, tour Madrid and surrounding cities, visit two of Madrid’s most renowned art museums, take a weekend trip to a different part of Spain, and you’ll have the opportunity to take part in interactive workshops (Spanish cooking, wine or dance). Finally, you’ll read an article that will help you to reflect on your observations of and experiences in Madrid, and you’ll write a brief paper incorporating your conclusions. All in all, Global Orientations seeks to help you make the most of your experience in Madrid so that you leave knowing where you’ve been and how the experience may have affected you as a person. 

Paris

This program aims to explore the place that Paris – and more broadly France -- hold in the public imaginary, while examining the tensions and antagonisms that rightfully complicate that view. Through a series of conferences, site visits, and seminars, the course examines four key moments or themes as a means of apprehending the density of French cultural, social, and political life. Starting with French republicanism, past, present, and future, we consider how France, at once the preeminent site of experiments in democratic liberty, is also plagued by institutional entrenchments of class stratification and the dual specters of colonialism and post-colonialism. Turning to Paris, the “capital of modernity,” we reflect on its 19th century emergence as a locus of phantasmagoria, mystery, and seduction, and the emergent capitalist forces that were shaping the urban landscape. We consider the early 20th century avant-garde, among the most important and radical artistic and political movements of our time, that opened new spaces in which to imagine the very terms of “art” and “politics,” to finish with a consideration of France in the contemporary moment, wrestling with global transformations, the crisis of the welfare state, and a tension between the reproduction of elites and a political commitment to equality that increasingly troubles the country’s educational system, politics, and cultural life.

Interdisciplinary and “inter-textual” in scope, the program fuses expert lectures, textual analysis, and out of the classroom experience, to bring together the artistic, the literary, and the social scientific, against the backdrop of global transformation.

Prague

The purpose of this class is primarily to discuss the history and culture of the Czech Republic and Central Europe—the intersection of many international influences--in the context of globalization and, conversely, to discuss globalization in the local context. An important dimension of the class will be a discussion about how international students should use their experience abroad (in this case Prague and, more generally, Central Europe) to better understand complicated developments on the global level and back at home.

Taught by Dr. Jiri Pehe  with a team of NYU Prague professors

Sydney

Australian society is replete with contradictions. Aussies famously describe their nation as the lucky country, yet from the Indigenous perspective, it might more aptly be called the stolen country. Australia is the land of the fair go, which cruelly detains refugees; a multicultural nation with a history of a white Australia policy; a place with distinctive local traditions, which takes many of its cues from global culture; an easy-going country with a surprisingly large degree of governmental control over individual liberties; a highly urbanised population that romances the Bush and the Outback as embodying ‘real’ Australia; a nation proud of its traditions of egalitarianism and mateship, with numerous rules about who is allowed in ‘the club’; a society with a history of anti-British and anti-American sentiment that simultaneously hold strong political allegiances and military pacts with Britain and the USA; and a place with a history of progressive social policy and a democratic tradition, which has never undergone a revolution. This course strives to make sense of Australian society and culture by exploring the complexities and contradictions in Australia’s self-image.

The course will be introduced with an overview, and followed by four sessions covering four distinct themes during Orientation and the first three weeks of semester. Each session will include a 1-hour lecture, either given by the instructor or a guest lecturer, and a recitation-style discussion. There are seven mandatory field trips: Sydney Harbour Cruise, Rocks Walking Tour, The Blue Mountains, Featherdale Wildlife Park, Balmain Bowling Club Lawn Bowls, Overnight trip to Inglevale Farm, and the NYU World Tour.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

This course is designed to help you understand contemporary Israel – the society, its problems and its pre-occupations. Together with tours and special lectures, the first half of the course will focus on some historical background. (The facts are important, but no one in the Middle East agrees on “the facts.” In this part of the world, debates about the past have a huge impact on the present.) Without going too much into the past, we will examine the formative events of Israeli society, those events that explain the special features of Israel today – its politics, institutions, culture, popular thinking and more. The course will begin in 1948 and progress to contemporary issues, including the most controversial ones.

Washington, DC

This course will introduce students to the citizens and communities in and of Washington, DC. Students will learn about the unique history of the city by exploring how it was founded, designed, governed and developed to become an international capitol. We will examine components of culture and intercultural competence as we learn how diverse populations maintain their cultural identity, support their communities and integrate into the fabric of the city. The portrayal of the Washington, DC in film will be presented to help students understand how this reflects and shapes our understanding of contemporary and historical American political culture. The course will also examine how individuals leverage their positions through institutions and organizations to ignite change in areas such as environmental sustainability, political activism, and international causes. Stakeholders from United States and foreign government agencies, domestic and international organizations, the non-profit and for-profit sectors, as well as public and private groups will deliver guest lectures and join interactive discussions. These sessions will be developed in collaboration with faculty from major pathway disciplines for the site and complimented by field experiences including a walking tour and museum visit in Washington, DC. Students will consider the current state of affairs and be challenged to imagine how the future might be different. Respectful, factual, passionate and influential dialogue will be encouraged and expected.

Sample syllabus


Hebrew and Judaic Studies

Tel Aviv

Active introduction to modern Hebrew as it is spoken and written in Israel today. Presents the essentials of Hebrew grammar, combining the oral-aural approach with formal grammatical concepts. Reinforces learning by reading of graded texts. Emphasizes the acquisition of idiomatic conversational vocabulary and language patterns.

This course is a continuation of Elementary Hebrew I, and following the communicative approach, it will make an extensive use of the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Likewise, it puts an emphasis on the cultural aspects of Hebrew. The teacher will provide a constructive framework for the course and guidance to the students. The role of the students is instrumental in making this course a successful and enjoyable experience. Therefore, you must come always prepared to class, particularly by doing your homework and arriving on time to the class. This course involves full interaction in Hebrew between students and the teacher, and speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than the assignments for Elementary Hebrew I.

The course is a continuation of Intermediate 1 level. The course will enhance students' vocabulary.Proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and hearing the Hebrew language. There will be a focus on the comprehension of literary texts, newspaper articles together with morphology and syntactic structures.

The course is a continuation of Intermediate 1 level. The course will enhance students' vocabulary, proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and hearing the Hebrew language. There will be a focus on the comprehension of literary texts, newspaper articles together with morphology and syntactic structures.

Aimed at training students in exact and idiomatic Hebrew usage and at acquiring facility of expression in both conversation and writing. Reading and discussion of selections from Hebrew prose, poetry, and current periodical literature.

Designed to provide a thorough grounding in Hebrew grammar with special emphasis on phonology, morphology, and syntax. Concentrated study of vocalization, accentuation, declensions, conjugations, and classification of verbs

Prague

The contours of Jewish life in Europe (and around the world) transformed drastically between the 16th and 20th centuries: legally, culturally, religiously, and politically. As empires gave way to nation-states and new globalizing structures emerged, the main arenas of Jewish politics and politics about Jews shifted. During these years, Jews acquired new rights as individuals, including the right to re-interpret what it meant to be Jewish. At the same time, communal institutions lost many of their coercive and political functions. No aspect of Jewish experience remained unchanged by these processes of modernization, which acted upon Jews and in which Jews also took part. But what does “modern” mean? Is it a quality of a society or of individuals? Might it simply be an historical period and, if so, when and why did it begin? Has it ended and what were its main features? In this class, we will explore how modernization affected Jewish communities and individuals identified as Jewish in various European contexts. We will also seek to understand how different cohorts of Europeans, both Jewish and non-Jewish, sought to claim or reject modernity, with specific reference to the modern “Jewish Question.” What place, if any, do Jews have as individuals and collectives in new socio-political and cultural orders? We will thereby come to appreciate better what it meant to be a Jew (or not to be a Jew) in the modern

Sample syllabus

 


History

Accra

The course examines the rise, growth, effects, and the abolition of the Atlantic Slave trade as well as its legacy. The course begins with a discussion of the nature of West African society before the introduction of the Atlantic Slave Trade; and the relations among Asante peoples, other neighboring West African peoples, the indigenous slave trade, and relations with Europeans in the Atlantic Slave Trade. The Atlantic Slave trade itself is analyzed from historical, ethnographic, sociological, economic and political perspectives, focusing on Africa, Europe and the Americas. The immediate and long term effects of the Slave Trade on Africa are considered, as well as the history of the trade's Abolition, and the legacy of the Atlantic Slave trade in African, European and American societies.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

The course examines significant moments in the development of Europe’s and America’s notions and images of one another from the 18th century to the present. The in-depth discussion will be based upon historical documents and cultural texts with equal attention to sources from America/the US and Europe/Germany in an effort to explore and evaluate the major theoretical and rhetorical paradigms (and the shifts therein) informing the perceptions as well as cultural constructions of the “other” past and present. Moreover, the course will investigate and evaluate recent manifestations of Anti-Americanism and analyse the ideological and cultural coordinates of current anti-American concepts in Europe/Germany as well as concepts of Europe as a socio-cultural model for the 21st century. In conclusion, the politics of the current US-Administration will be discussed in terms of their impact on transatlantic relations as well as on dealing with global challenges, particularly in the Middle East.

Sample Syllabus

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrangements were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narratives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During museum visits and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to integrate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

Sample Syllabus

Power and culture are intimately interwoven in the social history and the material substance of modern Berlin. This interdisciplinary course explores the changing historical contours of the keywords of Kultur (culture), Geist (spirit), Technik (technology), Bildung (education), Arbeit (work) and Macht (power) and contestations over their meanings. Through applying an interdisciplinary approach that integrates literature, film, art, architecture, and philosophy, we interrogate how meaning is made individually and collectively. We will look at how relationships between individual identities, state power, and social norms were shaped in the context of recurrent political and economic crisis and rupture and ask how changing local, national, supranational, and global contexts influence how meanings are made. Paying attention to possibilities and constraints for negotiating the terms of everyday life and for conforming or resisting, we will trace how Berliners made and make sense of their lives and the world they participate in shaping.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

The course will explore the unusually rich artistic and textual record of medieval holy people and places in Tuscany, and one site Umbria, Assisi. The goal of the course is to consider the intersection of popular religious expression, individual extraordinary lives, and the art and architecture produced by the society to celebrate its spiritual heroes. Students will be immersed in Italian medieval texts, art, and architecture as a means of understanding a vivid past which illuminates medieval civic pride and served as a springboard to the Italian Renaissance. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus

Next to many archives covering past centuries, Florence also hosts one of the most important archives for the study of contemporary history, namely the archive on the European Union. It is organizationally and academically linked to the European University Institute (EUI), also located in Florence, a top-level interdisciplinary graduate institute and think tank.

An archive on the EU represents a welcome challenge for history students, since it is not completely clear "what the EU is". It is neither a state in the traditional sense, nor is it limited to being an international organization. Whereas most forms of stateness in Europe and in the rest of the democratic world can be considered more or less stable, the EU is still a political actor in the making - and there is evidence that it will remain a moving target for historians, political scientists, law experts and economists for still many years to come. Thus, different from other archives, the archive on the EU does not contain documents and information on a historical process which is already completed, but which is and will still be ongoing.

Sample Syllabus

Public intellectuals could be tentatively defined as those intellectuals who, in the public sphere, engage in the battle of ideas. This course provides an exploration of the impact, role and debate surrounding intellectuals in culture and society. The focus is mostly on 20th century Europe, but the course aims to provide a glimpse of the wider panorama.

The aim of the course is first of all to offer student an encounter with some of the most important texts and authors that have had an impact on public opinions. Secondly the course functions as a forum for reflection on the themes and issues touched by our readings. Finally the course wants to provide the students with an interpretative framework to approach the continuing debate on intellectuals.

Our exploration will follow three overlapping and intertwining approaches, first, the impact of public intellectuals (ex: Zola on the Dreyfus affair), secondly the debate over the role of intellectuals (ex: Bauman on the postmodern intellectual), and thirdly an exploration of the boundaries of the issue of Public Intellectuals, (ex Machiavelli and his Prince, public intellectuals before the public sphere)

The course pursues these goals through lectures, readings, site visits, films and discussions.

Sample Syllabus

What is the role of the family in Italy? Italy is well-known for being a family centered society. What are the causes and consequences of this phenomenon? Since the 1960s, the family has undergone a series of changes, due to the women’s movement, decrease of marriages, fall of birthrate, etc. Is the family loosing its centrality in Italy? According to some scholars, the family is still one of the few shared values in Italy. The course will investigate the social function of the family in Italy, from the political unification of the country to the present. We will also analyze ideas of femininity and masculinity conveyed by the media and their connections to the idea of Italianness. The imagined Italian community was constructed on the site of the female body which was meant to epitomize a series of values such as fertility, health, prosperity, purity, tradition, etc. The course will also map the condition of women and LGBT people in Italy today.

Sample Syllabus

Wielding nearly unlimited authority over the lives - and the after-life – of millions of Europeans, the Catholic Church was by far the most important political, as well as cultural, power of the Middle Ages. The only global institution of this era, the Church was at the same time able to nourish strong local roots: its cardinals and popes came from all over the continent and dealt with international politics at the highest level, while priests and friars brought home to the people a faith tied to the neighborhood church and confraternity, and personified by a saint’s shrine and relics.Through a combination of lectures, students’ presentations, films and site visits, this course will explore selected aspects of the Medieval Church’s history: its often rocky relations with the other supreme power of the time, the Holy Roman Empire; the rise of monasticism and its different versions; the spread of heretical movements and their repression by the Inquisition; sainthood, and how “heavenly” women and men could serve to articulate very earthly ideologies on state, society, gender roles. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course presents an overview of the political, social, and cultural history of Italy from roughly 1300 to 1600. Its aim is to provide students with a basic understanding of the forces and processes that shaped the states and the societies of the Italian peninsula in an era of extraordinary changes: from the developments of urban civilization and the rise of humanism in the fourteenth and early fifteenth century, to the political and religious crisis of the late Quattrocento and early Cinquecento, and finally to the establishment of a new balance of power and a new cultural climate in the course of the sixteenth century. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

London

A survey of Europe from 1789 to the present. Investigates the political, social, economic, and cultural developments that shaped and continue to shape the modern age. Emphasis is on the evolution of the nation-state, on industrialization and its impact on society and politics, and on the intellectual responses to the rapid changes these developments inspired. Topics include Europe and the French Revolution; the rise of the nation-state, 1848-1914; and the impact of totalitarian ideologies on 20th-century Europe.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the origins of Islam and the development of its rituals and doctrines to the 21st century. It assumes no previous background in Islamic studies. Students will learn about topics such as the Koran and the Prophet, Islamic law, the encounter of East and West during the Crusades, and Islam in Britain. They will find out how Muslims in different regions have interpreted and lived their religion in past and present. Readings will include not only scholarly works but also material from primary sources, for example the Koran, biographies and chronicles. The course consists of a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, field trips and includes other media, such as film. 

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: Does not count toward the major or minor in Middle Eastern Studies.

This course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London’s changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world had ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size. The classroom sessions will be divided between a lecture and a class discussion. From week two onwards the class will begin with a discussion of the topic or period covered in the previous week‚s lecture, in which students will be expected to use knowledge and ideas gathered from lectures and from their weekly reading. There will also be four walking tours of parts of London which relate to the period we are studying at a particular time.

Sample Syllabus

Covers the impact of World War II, the postwar division of Europe, the onset of the cold war, the economic recovery and transformation of Western Europe, Stalinism in Eastern Europe, the 1960s and events of 1968, the origins and development of the European community, and the cultural and intellectual life of European nations in this period. Ends with a discussion of the Eastern European revolutions of 1989 and their significance, together with the reunification of Germany, for the future of the continent. 

Sample Syllabus

This course will focus on a history of Modern Imperialism from the beginning of the nineteenth century to post-Second World War decolonisation: with particular reference to the British Empire.

Sample Syllabus

To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the place that slavery played in Britain's past and its legacy today. In the eighteenth century, Britain prided itself on the liberty enjoyed by its people, yet it was the largest participant in the Atlantic slave trade, and grew rich on the wealth created by ports such as London, Bristol and Liverpool. In the same period some 15,000 black people lived in English ports and their presence has only recently been properly acknowledged. In the nineteenth century, however, Britain perceived itself as in the forefront of the global battle to end the slave trade and slavery itself. This pioneering campaign contributed to a more positive sense of British national identity. Yet Britain continued to depend on the importation of slave-grown produce and even began to ship hundreds of thousands of Indians as virtual slaves to many parts of the world. The ambivalent legacy of Britain’s past involvement with slavery remains important to Britain's multi-cultural identity and its global role today. 

Sample Syllabus

Paris

This course examines aspects of political and social change in France from the end of the French Revolution to the present day. Through an exploration of Paris neighborhoods, monuments and museums, we will look at how the city’s evolution has been inscribed on the urban landscape, and reflect on how history and national identity are imagined, produced and contested through the carving up of urban space. Major dates and events of French political history form the chronological backbone for this course, while class discussions are organized thematically from the perspective of social history and the history of ideas. Classes include walking tours and site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

A historical and political inquiry into the French system of relations with Francophone Africa from the ‘race to Empire’ in the 19th century to the current day. The main goals of the course are: to describe the historical development of French-African relations from the colonial to the post-independence era; to investigate the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of French influence in contemporary Francophone Africa; to understand the consequences for France of complex developments subsequent to colonialism, such as African immigration in France. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the crucial decade lasting from mid 1930s to the Liberation of France from German Occupation in 1944, while also going well beyond those chronological and geographical parameters. Opening with a discussion of the crises facing the French polity prior to World War Two, we will move on to explore the events, culture, politics and economics of the defeat of 1940, the Vichy regime and its relationship to Nazi Europe, the dynamics of resistance and collaboration, the deportation of Jews and other groups, the highly contested process of Liberation and retribution, and the wars of memory over the meaning of the wartime past. We shall analyze more particularly the impact of the violence of war upon children both in France and in Nazi-occupied Europe. Using secondary and primary texts, films and visual sources, as well as visits to the Paris sites, students will learn about the relationship of the past and the present in producing the history of this period as well as the methodological challenges of using witness accounts in reconstructing the past and will become competent critics and knowledgeable exponents of this essential stretch of French history and historiography.
Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus

Prague

The process of urbanization in the modern era has reflected the economic differences, the social and aesthetic customs, and the political nuances of the European nations and of Europe as a whole. Students will consider numerous issues of city planning and growth. Topics will include patterns of cultural distinctiveness, the influence of ethnic and religious concerns, and the political implications apparent in architectural design, neighborhood development, housing policies, and public space.

Sample syllabus

This course will examine the formation of modern national identities, especially in Central and Eastern Europe. After an in-depth study of the different scholarly theories on nationalism and of the relationships between the three fundamental concepts of nation, nationalism and state, the focus will be on the historical circumstances in which nationalism emerged and on the different ideological bases that supported the emergence of modern nations. We will first analyze the birth of the three first modern nations (England, the USA and France) and then place special emphasis on Central (Germany, Poland, Hungary, the Czech Lands) and Eastern (Russia) Europe. The question of the multinational states (especially the Habsburg Empire) and of the attempt to eliminate national tensions by trying to create nation-states after World War I will be analyzed, as well as the use of nationalism by the two main totalitarian ideologies of the 20th century, National Socialism and Communism. We will also at colonial and post-colonial nationalism, as well as at the role played by nationalism in post-Communist Central Europe.

Sample syllabus

Shanghai

In this course we will select a number of critical issues in modern Chinese history to examine the political, social and cultural transformations of modern China. Topics of lectures include Confucianism and its modern fate, popular movements, the Great Leap Forward Movement, the role of Shanghai in modern China, Tiananmen Movement and the prospect of Chinese political reforms. The course will be approached through lectures, site visits, class discussions, and research.

Sample Syllabus

From the Warring States period to the present, what have Chinese and others understood to be the meaning of “China,” and what have been the broad implications of this understanding? This course is divided into four chronological periods: Antiquity—from the period of the ‘central kingdoms’ to the formation of the early empire; Middle Period—China Among Equals; Early Modern: 1350-1910—China, Global Trade, and Imperialism; Modern: 1910-present—China Redux

Washington, DC

In the 21st century, perhaps no bilateral relationship is more important than that between the People’s Republic of China and the United States. How this relationship between the globe’s sole superpower and a rapidly emerging contender evolves not only will affect their state-to-state interactions but also will affect the daily lives of their citizens, the nations of the Asia-Pacific region, and, inevitably, will have global repercussions. To understand and fully appreciate the current status of US-PRC relations, and in order to envision the possible course this relationship might follow, an examination of their past interactions is necessary. To provide such a foundation, this course will survey major trends, policies, and events that played a role in shaping the Sino-American path to the present and will continue to influence the path to the future.

The format of the course will be discussion. Each week, the class will begin with a general review of the historical context of the period being examined, followed by a student-led discussion of the week’s assigned readings.

Sample Syllabus


Internship for Credit

Berlin

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning introduces GLS students to Berlin with an intensive
program of cultural preparation followed by site-dependent research.
The course is divided into 3 blocks (12 sessions) plus 3 sessions for
introduction and student presentations:

a. Orientation
Mapping Berlin I–III

b. Education and Research
Students will be introduced to the educational system as well as to the
local research facilities. Discussions, readings and assignments will
also serve as a preparation for the site-specific projects over the
Spring term.

c. Cultural Preparation and Berlin Today
The sessions will offer a preliminary survey of historical, political,
cultural and social developments during the past century and in
contemporary Berlin: What factors have encouraged and impeded
Berlin's flourishing as a diverse metropolis? Tracing developments
through 20th-century Berlin, the seminars will help to understand the
City’s contemporary debate about history and commemoration.
Special attention will also be paid to current questions of urbanization
and migration. Sessions will largely take place in situ, in locations of
contention and debate.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.  Advanced Spanish skills (beyond Intermediate II) recommended.

This course combines a seminar based weekly section together with intensive internships in businesses, NGOs or other organizations. The experiential part will consist of 10 weekly hours of work within a pre-arranged organization. The academic part is meant to assist students in getting the most from this experience and provide theoretical and methodological elements to critically examine their experiences. It weaves together research design and methods with an empirical and theoretical examination of recent social phenomena in Argentina. We will use selected themes and topics to explore theoretical perspectives and selected aspects of contemporary Argentine society. In parallel we will explore how to construct a research project, collect data and analyze its contents.

Sample Syllabus

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Please visit the NYU Buenos Aires Internships Page for application information. Intermediate Spanish or above is strongly recommended.

This course requires a 90-minute weekly seminar and a minimum of 10 hours fieldwork a week at an approved internship field site. The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Argentine Civil Society. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency. The course provides you with tools to analyze your organization’s approach, its policies, its programs, and the political, legal, social, economic and cultural contexts in which it operates. Guest-speakers are invited to the seminar and case studies on Argentina civil society are discussed.  You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

London

Note: Students accepted to this course must indicate on their Student Information Form that they want a Tier-4 General Student Visa; you will not be permitted to intern (paid or unpaid) in the UK without a Tier-4 visa.A Tier-4 visa costs a minimum of £310 GBP (approximately $527 USD), plus any applicable shipping and expedite fees.

Enrollment by permission only.  Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 16 hours fieldwork per week.  Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU. EUSA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus


Paris

Open to Global Liberal Studies Juniors only.

This is a full-year course divided over two semesters. The first semester course is designed to give students a broad overview of contemporary French society and its institutions while at the same time provide insight into the actual workings of such institutions on the ground. Topics covered include the institutions of the 5th Republic, the functioning of the welfare state, French cultural policy, the organization of local politics, urban issues, and immigration. Frequent site visits in and around Paris. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Shanghai

This course aims to complement and enhance the internship experience. Students will learn to critically examine their fieldwork in order to reflect upon what their particular, concrete experience reveals about life in contemporary Shanghai.

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Application information available here. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite. 

Sample Syllabus

Requires departmental approval prior to registration. Open only to NYU Media, Culture, & Communication students. Interested MCC students should contact Jonathan Martinez jm4599@nyu.edu

Tel Aviv

 

 

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning I includes both classroom instruction and community experience (whenever practicable, individual community experience). the principle goal of Experiential Learning I is immersion in the current and historical character of the site.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

Can be counted for SCA-UA Internship credit (government and non-profit placements only).  Can also be counted for Politics major credit (internship with domestic policy focus only)

The seminar is designed to complement the internship fieldwork experience. In it we explore many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Students who secure an internship through or with the assistance of NYU Washington, DC must confirm their spot in the program and enroll in the internship class in order to accept the internship. Students are required to pursue 10 hours/ week in their internships to earn course credit; however NYU Washington, DC advises that students pursue ~20 hrs/ week in internship commitments. If students elect to participate in an internship that exceeds the recommended number of hours, they may be advised to reduce their academic courseload. Students are highly encouraged to consult NYU Washington DC staff for assistance with these decisions.

PLEASE NOTE: Internships that take place in Maryland, regardless of whether credit is awarded for the experience, require that your school or department have a certificate of approval to operate in the state.  If you are interested in a placement in Maryland, please contact global.internships@nyu.ed before applying to the internship for more information.

Sample syllabus (PDF)


Irish Studies

This course examines the history of the Irish in Britain from earliest times to the present day, with a
particular focus on the last two centuries and a component which introduces students to the role of
archives in historical research. The course takes a broadly thematic approach to the subject of the Irish in Britain looking at set topics each week across the chronological range. By doing so, it provides students with a wide-ranging and comparative historical perspective on issues such as: changing motivations for migration; evolving patterns of transport and settlement; shifting social and political influences; the development of differing cultural identities and expression. In addition to looking at relations between migrant and host communities, the course also explores interactions between the Irish in Britain and the Irish in Ireland and investigates how the relationship between those who leave and those who stay is reflected in the social, political and cultural domains. A strong emphasis of the course will be access to archival records and collections in order to provide students with the opportunity to directly consult contemporaneous documentation and other audio-visual materials. The course will conclude with a review of the key themes and an assessment of the current position of the Irish in Britain in relation to the wider Irish diaspora.

Sample Syllabus


Italian Studies

Florence

Students will gain understanding of basic messages in simple oral and written material containing standard phrases (questions, high-frequency commands, and courtesy formulae) and some sentence-length expressions, supported by proper context and presented in a clear and plain language. They will be able to acquire key information in the listening and reading of brief, simple, authentic material (i.e. directions, maps, timetable and advertisements), and have a fair understanding of messages of short standard Italian conversations in a limited number of content areas, presented in a clearly audible (and occasionally slowed) speech. Their understanding will include present events and very simple events in the past, presented clearly and in the context of familiar topics.

Students will be able to engage in basic conversation relying mainly on ready-made expressions and on short phrases and to respond to open-ended questions as well as to initiate communication on familiar topics, even without being able to continue the conversation in an autonomous way. Stronger emphasis will be given on communicative situations involving first and second person; writing activities will include simple autobiographical information, brief messages, simple forms and lists, where pertinent vocabulary and structure are provided.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Elem I

Students will gain understanding of oral and written communication on a variety of topics, ranging from personal routine, taste and hobbies to include family, fashion and food. They will be able to acquire key information from listening and reading brief, simple, authentic material, and have a fair understanding of the meaning of standard Italian conversations on a variety of familiar topics, including present and past events, presented in a clearly audible speech.

Students will be able to engage in conversations on a variety of real-life situations regarding familiar subjects, to respond to open-ended questions and to initiate communication on these topics, despite not having the skills to continue the conversation in an autonomous way. They will be able to give and follow directions, instructions and commands. Stronger emphasis will be on communicative situations involving first and second person, while skills in mono-directional oral presentation will begin to emerge. Writing activities will include narration of present and past events, personal experiences, school and work situations, as well as brief messages to family and friends.

Sample syllabus.

This daily course immerses students in the Italian language. The basic structures and vocabulary of the Italian language are presented. Students are also provided with systematic practice of oral Italian through dialogues, pattern drills, and exercises. Special emphasis is given to correct pronunciation, sound placement, and intonation. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Elem I & II or Intensive Elementary Italian

Students will gain understanding of oral and written communication on various topics, ranging from basic routine tasks to travel, shopping, cultural customs and events in the past, present and future. They will appreciate the increasingly elaborate expression of personal wishes, feelings and hopes. Students will recognize key information in the reading and listening of authentic material, provided it is clearly presented and structured, and will begin to understand advanced texts featuring narration and description of events.

Students will be able to handle a large range of conversation tasks and standard
social situations. They will be able to interact beyond their mere immediate needs, discussing in some depth topics such as leisure activities, professional goals and personal taste; skills in oral presentation will begin to solidify, as students will sustain a general conversation and be understood. Narrative skills are limited but begin to emerge. Students will be able to write short letter

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Interm I

Students will gain understanding of oral and written material on various topics, ranging from general routine and leisure time activities, to more complex topics such as politics, environmental issues, and work environment. Students will be able to read and appreciate pertinent authentic texts with a clear structure, and will also be able to some extent to infer and extract from the material information which at first is only implicit. The understanding of material focusing on the expression of personal thoughts and feelings will progress to include increasingly sophisticated nuances.

Students will be able to handle most uncomplicated conversation tasks and standard social situations. Students will be able to: debate and argue for opposite viewpoints on a range of topics and make comparisons and hypotheses. Presentation skills will solidify; skills in narrating in paragraphs will emerge and develop in a creative direction. Students will be able to write letters and short stories and demonstrate limited command of sentence syntax.

Sample syllabus.

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 1 & ITAL-UA 2, Elementary Italian I & II; or ITAL-UA 10, Intensive Elementary Italian

This course offers students who are at the intermediate level a daily immersion class. The acquisition and practice of more sophisticated structures of Italian are undertaken. Fundamental oral and written skills are developed, and vocabulary enrichment and conversational ability are emphasized. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 11, ITAL-UA 12, Intermediate Italian I & II; or ITAL-UA 20, Intensive Intermediate Italian

The course is an intensive review of Italian grammar. Classes are three times a week. The aim of the course is to develop the knowledge of morphosyntactic structures of the Italian language, and to also reinforce intercultural competence. Class work consists of both written and spoken activities, conversations, and papers and readings related to a wide range of different genres (newspaper articles, magazines, extracts from contemporary Italian literature). All of the activities are primarily aimed to promote the usage of Italian language in real situations. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 30, Advanced Review of Modern Italian

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in speaking present-day Italian. Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students develop vocabulary in a variety of topics, improve pronunciation, and learn an extensive range of idiomatic expressions. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 30, Advanced Review of Modern Italian

Students will view and discuss Italian films to enrich their knowledge of language and culture, including: classic films; contemporary films, which we will compare with the classics; films in current release and available in the theaters of Florence. Through creative activities, students will work to improve their writing, reading and vocabulary, as well as their skills of observation, comprehension and interpretation. Students will discuss the themes presented by the various films and their place within both Italian history and the history of Italian cinema. Students will address the different elements that make up the text of each film: direction, screenplay, sound score, cinematography and editing.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: successful completion of ITAL-UA 30 Advanced Review of Modern Italian or permission of instructor.

This course, conducted in Italian, will present the Classics of the Italian Literature in prose and poetry from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, through a specific topic: the journey, understood either as a spiritual/existential journey and as a ‘love’ journey, but also as the real journey of exploration and contact or the imaginary journey. We will relate the topic's historical and social contexts and identities, and comment on the spiritual peregrination of Dante's Commedia and on the epistle of Petrarch's Ascent of Mount Ventoux. We will introduce the travelogue Il Milione (The Travels of Marco Polo), discussing the figure of the famous merchant and traveler Polo. Moreover, analyzing the Decameron of Boccaccio, we will consider the role of merchants and travelers in some of his novelle. We will highlight metaphors of traveling in the tradition of amor cortese (courtly love), stressing some images in the poems of the Sicilian and Tuscan School and in the Stil Novo, reading as well from Dante's Rime and Petrarch's Canzoniere, and not forgetting the Women Poets, such as Gaspara Stampa. Finally, we will discuss fantastic journeying to the Moon and spatial movements in the chivalric epic of the Orlando Furioso by Ludovico Ariosto. Through these texts, and constant cross references to the contemporary Italian classics (Calvino and Eco among others), we will study the origins of Italian Literature.

Sample Syllabus

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

Dante's Comedy, written in the first years of the fourteenth century, is by any standard a landmark of world literature, and has had a paramount influence on Western culture as a whole. This course will introduce students to the Inferno, the first of the poem's three cantiche, which narrates Dante’s journey through Hell and includes many of the poem's most famous encounters. Before approaching the Inferno, we will also read and discuss a selection of crucial passages from the Vita Nuova, the book where Dante himself tells the story of his love for Beatrice, and comments upon a selection of the youthful poems he dedicated to her.Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

Presents a study of post-World War II Italian politics and society in comparative and historical perspective. Seeks explanations of Italian political development in specific historical factors such as the 19th century patterns of state formation and the experience of fascism. Comparative analysis seeks to show how the social structure, political culture, and party systems have shaped Italy's distinct development. Current and recurrent political issues include the problem of integrating the south into the national economy and state response to social movements, particularly terrorism. Conducted in English.

Sample syllabus.

A seminar in Italian literature focusing on a special topic in twentieth-century or contemporary literature.  Course conducted in English; readings in translation.

This course focuses on the travel experience in Modern Italian literature from the 20th Century, in authors such as Vittorini, Pavese, Levi, Calvino, Pasolini, Manganelli, Celati and others. We will analyze their fictional and non-fictional production depicting the Americas, the Middle and Far East, Africa, but also an underdeveloped and rural Italy. The purpose of the course is, throughout readings on relatively unknown texts and comparisons with the most acknowledged ones, to introduce new perspectives on Italian identity, its historical evolution, and the challenges it encounters in a new worldwide context. These lessons will offer the students new guidelines for reading Italian classics by emphasizing topics such as travel, exoticism, cultural clash, relativism and an incipient globalization.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus

Urban culture is complex, fantastic, frightening, and a part of daily life, encompassing everything from the opera to street musicians, the public library to the piazza, the theater to local cafes and social clubs. This course, where cities are considered to be sources of cultural invention, explores through literature, history, social science and student experience, the evolution of high and popular culture, both modernist and post-modern. Emphasis will be placed on how cultures create bonds between specific interest groups, and how culture becomes the arena for acting out or resolving group conflict. This course will focus on Italian cities, including Florence. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

The course covers the evolution of Italian opera from its beginnings in Florence to the early 20th century with special emphasis on Monteverdi, Rossini, Donizetti, Verdi and Puccini. The approach is multidisciplinary and aims at a comprehensive survey of the music theatre in the context of the Italian cultural heritage. Literary sources, musico-dramatic features, vocal styles are studied in connection with major works that best represent trends and genres in the Italian operatic tradition. Students are expected to master the distinctive characteristics of such genres as favola in musica, intermezzo, opera seria, opera buffa, grand opera, dramma lirico, and the basic elements of Italian versification. Students listen to and watch recorded operas and attend performances in Florence or other Italian cities. Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces to the many villas surrounding the city of Florence. It aims at illustrating their origins, their history from the Middle-Age to the twentieth century, as well as their economic and ideological factors in the relationship with the city of Florence. The course draws on many disciplines, such as architecture, history, economy, social history, history of art, and landscape art. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

To provide the student with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilizations of ancient Italy from ca. 1000 to 80 B.C.E. with special emphasis on the Etruscans and their relationship to the early Romans. We shall examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning, and the minor arts through power point presentations, the assigned texts, and field trips. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course presents an investigation on how civil society activism evolved in Italy and in Eastern and Western political regimes over the last 30 years, with a special emphasis on the use that civil society activists made of media outlets (i.e. television, radio, newspapers, and digital media). In the course, students will be introduced to the transformations introduced in current political regimes (both democratic and authoritarian) by media activism, and they will develop a closer understanding and a critical view of the Italian and international media-politics-civil society conundrums.

Sample Syllabus


Journalism

Buenos Aires

NYU Media, Culture, & Communication students can take this course for major/minor credit.

In this course students will develop, pitch, research, report, write, edit and present original articles of various kinds on several subjects throughout the semester. Using the city and people of Buenos Aires as their focus, students will work in teams for some projects and individually for others to hone their skills as observers, interviewers, reporters and writers.

Sample Syllabus

Accra

The class will explore the sociocultural and philosophical context of the media industry and the practice of mass communication in Africa in general, and Ghana in particular. This broad perspective will be examined against the background notion that the media do not function in a vacuum. Thus, students will examine how these contexts, informed by the dominant philosophies and macro-institutional practices of society, mitigate or even dictate the operations of the media. As a special focus, we will examine the significance of the liberalization of the airwaves in emerging democracies such as Ghana.

Sample Syllabus

London

Students in this course must also register for the Methods and Practice Theatre visit in the evenings.

This course carries an additional fee of approximately $356 in Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 to cover the cost of theatre tickets (exact amount will be reflected on tuition bill for the semester). Students should also be prepared to pay up to £100 (approximately $150) for extra tickets while in London as part of the Methods & Practice course.

Using the cultural life of London as its focus, this course aims to enable students to report on the diversity of cultural and artistic activity in the British capital across the spectrum, with an inevitable focus on theatre and live performance (classical music/opera, classical and contemporary dance) given the professor's own ongoing career as a theatre critic; other art forms, including art, television, and film, are considered, as well, depending on what is on in the capital at any given time. Numerous forms and techniques will be explored through la mixture of lecture, discussion, and student presentations, and students will be required to follow the work of several critics throughout the term even as they develop their own critical voice and methodology. At every turn, the course aims to wed the specific cultural goings-on in London during the semester to the methods and practice necessary to respond to and evaluate the work on offer.

Sample Syllabus

Designed to interrogate the impact of various forms of media on "society" and various notions of society on "media." Students consider conventional and unconventional media in Britain - from the London Times to movies to fashion magazines - in an effort to interpret British culture. The key question is not "Is this text 'good'?" but "What does this text mean?"

Sample Syllabus 

Prague

Using the cultural life of Prague as its focus, this course aims to enable students to report on the diversity of cultural and artistic activity in the Czech capital in eight main areas—film, photography, literature, architecture, music, visual arts, travel, and Prague in literature. Several forms and techniques will be explored through lecture, discussion and assignments, including: news reports, interviews, reviews (film, literature, theater), feature stories, essays, and commentaries. During the course, students will learn not only about Prague's cultural landscape but they will be encouraged to examine it in various journalistic and literary forms. One of the leading aims of this courses is also to introduce to them six extraordinary persons, whose work in their respective areas reached international attention. 

Sample syllabus

This course will focus on foreign reporting in US and British newspapers and journals, looking at the history of foreign reporting, the different kinds of media in which it appears, the topics it covers and the skills necessary to perform it. Students will read and discuss contemporary reporting and famous reportage from the past, listen to foreign correspondents and write their own stories. By the end of the course students should have a good understanding of foreign reporting and will be well equipped with some of the practical skills necessary to follow it as a career. 

Sample syllabus

The course focuses on combining the creative techniques of fiction with the rigor of journalistic travel writing to produce stories about Prague (not only) that move beyond the constraints of the news and feature story: stories that engage, resonate with readers, provide insight – stories which “produce the emotion”.

The course proceeds by the reading and analysis of important contemporary journalism and classic travel pieces: examination of the narrative; fictional and literary devices used in travel writing; examination of and practice with various information gathering strategies; humor; point of view; unique voice. Distinguished Czech travel writers/journalists/photographers will be invited as guest lecturers.

Sample syllabus

Focusing on the techniques and aesthetics of 35mm cinematography, students are trained for hands-on camera operating, exterior and studio lighting design, exponometry, and color correction, as well as mise-en-scène and the fundamentals of cinematic language. Through this course students will engage in 16mm exercises and 35mm exercises. This course is coordinated with Directing Traditions for the production of individual, 35mm narrative film projects and includes lectures, workshops, consultations, and on-the-set supervision.

Only open to students who have received special permission.  Email sylvan.solloway@nyu.edu to apply.

Note: Students majoring in Journalism & Mass Communication (CAS) or Media, Culture and Communication (Steinhardt) may take this course in conjunction with MCC-UE 1400 Communication and Cultural Contexts for credit in the major. 

The course offers an interpretation of mass media and their real - as well as desired or feared - role in society, with a focus on media in Europe and the Czech Republic. The participants will get a survey of theoretical and normative perspectives on the relationship between media and their content on one hand and society and individuals on the other hand. The focus will be on what enables people to relate so many expectations, fears and prejudices to the media and their performance. Specifically, we will discuss (1) the typology of media as communication means, organizations and institutions, (2) media products, (3) types of audiences, (4) the (possible and probable) media effects, as well as positive or negative expectations and (5) the specific role of media in various cultures (with an indepth insight in Czech society).

 

This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area of international/global communication. Through a historical perspective, a framework will be established for the appreciation of the development of the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of this rapidly evolving field. Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to a critical analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, including trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with attention being paid both to Western-based multimedia conglomerates, as well as to the increasing global prominence of media corporations based in other regions, contributing to the reversal of international media flows and challenging the global hegemony of the Western media producers. Particular emphasis will be on the Czech Republic, as an empirical example of a national media system affected by global media flows.

Sample syllabus

Shanghai

This course provides an introduction to the work of the reporter, with particular focus on covering China, and offers students a chance to learn and practice basic journalism skills, including news writing and descriptive/feature writing. Visiting speakers will also offer insights into the role of the journalist and the challenges faced, and provide additional feedback on students’ work and ideas.

Sample Syllabus

Sydney

In this hybrid reading / writing class, we will explore environmental journalism from an Australian perspective. We will meet for a weekly in-class seminar, except for three to four weeks during the session set aside for field trips. Our field trips will give us the opportunity to experience environmental issues first-hand, meet people, gather story ideas and find local Australian context for our own writing. Guest speakers will join us occasionally to further explore key issues. Our in-class seminars will briefly introduce key journalism concepts and techniques to those new to journalism and reinforce and further develop these skills for experienced journalism students. During each in-class seminar we will also discuss set readings, and explore the environment beat, reading stories that have been reported in Australia and around the world. We will consider work that explores this journalistic tradition, its forms and its themes and the place it takes in the new media world. Drawing our inspiration from great writers, we will find our own stories, our own voices and learn to tell our own tales. We will work on a class blog and each student will produce a news story which may be published on the blog, and a feature story for publication either on our blog or in an Australian or international print or digital outlet.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

This will be a hands-on course examining the idea of truth and spin in Washington D.C., politics, governance, journalism, science and society. It will be part overview and lecture on topics central to the course and part active reporting and writing. Spin is the Washington art of taking something and making it seem truth-y even when it’s not quite factual. This is a user’s guide for reporters and non-journalists alike. How to spot and dodge the misleading, the incomplete truth, along with the history and reasoning behind manipulation of facts. Advice from those who practice spin and those who successfully avoid it and what it’s like to be stuck as a victim of spin. To take advantage of the unique Washington location and distinct attitude in the city, students will participate in press conferences and go to public hearings on Capitol Hill in reporting roles and then write news-style articles. Invited guest speakers are from NASA, NOAA, the White House Office of Science Technology and Policy, environmental activist groups, energy lobbyists and Washington media. The intersection of the media with science, politics and economics on the issue of global warming will be a focal point of this course and how it is all spun.

Sample Syllabus (PDF)

 


Law and Society

Florence

Over the last decade, UN interventions in war zones have increased tremendously but, Syria and Yemen remain a no-go zone, individual liberties are challenged in the name of security, and freedom of expression to some appears to be terrible blasphemy to others: International Human Rights are a universal and contemporary question raising social, economic, political and philosophical issues. This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to International Human Rights aiming at understanding the societal controversies and issues pertaining to Human Rights, its mechanisms and nature. Beyond the legal logic this course raises a critical view on the contemporary political and social issues of the 21st century.

This course places emphasis on the student, the learning processes and skills. The learning outcomes depend on the efforts of both the teacher and the student. The pedagogical approach favors an autonomous but, guided learning process and gives the student the opportunity to customize his/her own curriculum within the existing syllabus, according to his/her personal interests, his/her professional project as well as preferred learning support. Debate in class will trigger critical thinking and discussion in a culturally diverse and intellectually safe environment.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

This course will begin by reviewing the nature and sources of law. Yet it will do so not as part of a purely academic exercise but in order to answer some very practical philosophical questions, such as: Why isn't law the same thing as justice? Where does legality end and revolution begin? Why does the Anglo-American legal system make legal resolution into a game? Are war crimes tribunals legal proceedings or merely victor's revenge dressed up in procedural garb? Why doesn't law which is considered divinely inspired (i.e. the Old and New Testaments) serve as a legitimate basis of law in the West? The aim of this course is to show how understanding the nature and sources of law can help us understand real-world events and issues. By the end of the course students will have an appreciation of the limits of law and how law fits into the fabric of society alongside other norms, such as morality and religion. Students should also learn to identify interconnections and relationships between ideas in seemingly disparate areas of thought.

Sample syllabus

Shanghai

In its remarkable rise, China studies the world. But, in applying lessons from abroad, China often modifies them to reflect China’s own cultural values and traditions, as they have evolved over millennia. In Beijing and Shanghai as well as Washington and New York, officials, experts, and students use the same global vernacular of “governance” to discuss approaches to pressing public problems. Students in either country will hear terms (often in English) such as rule of law, democracy, transparency, environmental sustainability, and CSR (corporate social responsibility.) But the practical meanings of such terms are shaped by what might be called different “operating systems.” This course will seek to provide students with basic “vocabulary” (words, concepts and frameworks) of history, political, legal and economic systems needed to begin to “translate” between American and Chinese governance systems. To do so, the course will draw on the diverse backgrounds of NYU Shanghai students, and students’ daily experiences as students in at NYU Shanghai. We hope to learn about China (and the US), but also to reflect—in the light of 911, the 2008 global economic crisis, the explosion of social media and cyberissues, and climate change—on the ways in which NYU Shanghai students may learn how to navigate and help address the 21st century’s core challenges.

Sample Syllabus


Liberal Studies

Florence

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in literature, music, and the visual and performing arts from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on global developments in culture. The course covers such literary works as; A Grain of Wheat, the poetry of Adrienne Rich, and;Crime and Punishment; films like;The Battle for Algiers; the art of Picasso and Hokusai; and musical works by Stravinsky and Ali Akbar Khan.

Open to LS and GLS students only.

This course focuses on the world’s great traditions in philosophy, theology, history, and political science from the Enlightenment through Modernity. It familiarizes students with the impact of the colonial and post-colonial eras on major world discourses about the nature of human identity and society through a comparative study of seminal texts. The course includes such works as The Communist Manifesto,The Wretched of the Earth, and Orientalism.

 

Linguistics

Accra

Please note: This course satisfies the MAP Societies and the Social Sciences requirement.

Considers contemporary issues in the interaction of language and society, particularly work on speech variation and social structure. Focuses on ways in which social factors affect language. Topics include language as a social and political entity; regional, social, and ethnic speech varieties; bilingualism; and pidgin and creole languages.

 

Introduces the language behavior of African Americans. Discusses African American Vernacular English in terms of its linguistic and cultural distinctiveness, both intrasystemically and in comparison with other dialects of American English. Relates the English vernacular spoken by African Americans in urban settings to creole languages spoken on the South Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in West Africa. Also approaches the subject from the perspective of the history of the expressive uses of African American Vernacular English, and the educational, attitudinal, and social implications connected with the language.


Mathematics

Florence

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra and Calculus with a grade of C or higher or passing placement exam.

This course is only open to Economics Policy Majors and prospective majors.

This course introduces calculus for real valued functions of a single real variable and of several real variables. In particular, it shows how calculus can be used to solve optimization problems for these functions, including constrained optimization problems which can be solved by substitution. A substantial number of economic examples will be analyzed during the course.

 

 

 

London

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH-UA 121 Calculus I or the equivalent.

This is an introductory course on linear algebra, one of the most important and basic areas of mathematics, with many real-life applications. The course introduces students to both the theory of vector spaces and linear transformations and the techniques such as row-reduction of matrices and diagonalisation, which can be applied to problems in areas such as engineering, economics, and mathematical biology.

As well as mastering techniques, it is important that the students get to grips with the more abstract ideas of linear algebra, and learn to understand and write correct mathematical arguments. Taking an active approach to problem-solving is also important.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH-UA 122/Calculus II and MATH-UA 123/Calculus III or the equivalent.  Not open to students who have taken MATH-UA 235/Probability and Statistics.

An introduction to the mathematical treatment of random phenomena occurring in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Axioms of mathematical probability, combinatorial analysis, binomial distribution, Poisson and normal approximation, random variables and probability distributions, generating functions, Markov chains applications. 

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH-UA 121 Calculus I or the equivalent.

Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer’s rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms. 


Media, Culture, & Communication

Buenos Aires

Using a historical perspective, the course aims to acquaint students with Latin American theories, practices and representations of the media. Departing from a critical approach to Habermas theory of the public sphere, the course will trace the arc of the media in Latin America since independence to the incumbent post-neoliberal area and the so-called “Media Wars”. Given that Argentina is facing an extraordinary conflict between the government and the Clarín media conglomerate (the largest of its kind in Latin America), the students will engage in the current incendiary debates about the role of the media, the new media law and the complex relationship between the media, politics and the state.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course presents an investigation on how civil society activism evolved in Italy and in Eastern and Western political regimes over the last 30 years, with a special emphasis on the use that civil society activists made of media outlets (i.e. television, radio, newspapers, and digital media). In the course, students will be introduced to the transformations introduced in current political regimes (both democratic and authoritarian) by media activism, and they will develop a closer understanding and a critical view of the Italian and international media-politics-civil society conundrums.

Sample Syllabus

London

This course will explore, through a series of lectures and discussions, how the process of globalization is transforming media internationally, with a particular emphasis on the audio-visual media. It will also examine the impact of new technologies, especially the Internet, on global communications. Emphasizing the transnational context of media and culture, the course will aim to approach global media and cultural production from a wide range of theoretical frameworks relevant to contemporary condition - from political economy to cultural analysis. 

Sample Syllabus

Paris

Registration priority for Media, Culture, and Communication (MCC) courses offered at NYU Paris will be given to NYU MCC majors. Other students will be able to register as space remains available. Please pay close attention to course notes displayed in Albert.

This course introduces students to the basic structures and practices of media in Europe and their relationship to everyday social life. It pays special attention to the common models and idioms of media in Europe, with an emphasis on national and regional variations. Specific case studies highlight current trends in the production, distribution, consumption, and regulation of media. Topics may include: national or regional idioms in a range of media genres, from entertainment, to advertising and publicity, to news and information; legal norms regarding content and freedom of expression; pirate and independent media; and innovations and emerging practices in digital media. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Prague

The course will include an introduction of the influential sociological theory of consumerism by Zygmunt Bauman. Other theories (see the syllabus bellow) will be presented as well. After the presentation of the mentioned theories, we will concentrate on their application to the Central European environment, which will be discussed in the context of globalization. The main aim is to show the relationship between the advertisement and the society in the current phase of society’s development, which can be characterized as a mutual discussion, but a discussion of unequal partners.

In this context we will discuss the impact of current mechanisms of consumer society, which through the advertisement influences issues like i.e.: gender, politics, art, national identity, ethnic relations and democracy. We will also discuss chosen types of advertisement messages, how they influence the viewer and which ethical problems arise from such an influence.

Sample syllabus

This course will examine “social media” from a cultural perspective, with a focus on how media technologies figure in practices of everyday life and in the construction of social relationships and identities. This course is based closely on one offered in New York by Professor Laura Portwood-Stacer, but we will examine many of the issues in the context of Central and Eastern Europe and compare the “Western” experience of social media with the situation in the post communist world.

Although many of our readings will deal with Social Network Sites (SNSs), we will attempt to form an expansive definition of what constitutes “social media.” We will also work from an expansive definition of “technology,” considering the term in a cultural sense to include various practices and tools used to communicate in everyday life. The course will also look closely at the impact of social media on journalism and activism, including a dissection of the recent debates on the power of social media to transform these fields.

Sample syllabus

This course provides an overview of critical thinking on contemporary media production, media outcomes and media systems. Introduce theoretical approaches and practice used to analyze the content, structure, and context of media in society. We will explore factors shaping media texts, including: politics, economics, technology, and cultural traditions. The dominant critical perspectives that contribute to our understanding of media will be read, discussed, and employed. The course has three broad objectives: 1. Develop a critical awareness of media environments, 2. develop a familiarity with concepts, themes and theoretical approaches of media criticism, and the terms associated with these approaches and 3. develop an ability to adopt and adapt these frameworks in your own analyses of mediated communication.

Sample syllabus

Only open to students who have received special departmental permission. Please contact Jonathan Martinez (jm4599@nyu.edu).

NOTE: Students majoring in Journalism and Mass Communication (CAS) or Communication Studies (Steinhardt) may take this course in conjunction with JOUR-UA 9298, Media and Society, for credit in the major.

A veritable buzzword, globalization refers to several newly emerged phenomena. To study it means to delve into several areas in which it manifests itself. These are, to name just the three most visible ones, the economy, culture and politics. In any of these dimensions globalization, as it is discussed in the last twenty years, functions through the media. Media does not portray globalization, but it is its important part. A study of globalization is inherently diverse and eclectic. So is this course. Students will read, watch films, analyze and discuss them. In class discussions and short papers they are expected to engage questions, issues, themes and topics connected to globalization, culture and the media. Special attention will be devoted to the impact of globalization on the late communist and post-communist world, and also to the ways by which the globalization issues are framed and discussed in the media discourse. All assigned texts and films are mandatory. Students are required to follow current events in the media (cable TV, newspapers, Internet). Class participation is expected as it is part of the final grade.

Sample syllabus

This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area of international/global communication. Through a historical perspective, a framework will be established for the appreciation of the development of the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of this rapidly evolving field. Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to a critical analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, including trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with attention being paid both to Western-based multimedia conglomerates, as well as to the increasing global prominence of media corporations based in other regions, contributing to the reversal of international media flows and challenging the global hegemony of the Western media producers. Particular emphasis will be on the Czech Republic, as an empirical example of a national media system affected by global media flows.

Sample syllabus

Shanghai

This course introduces the philosophy of cybernetic machines with reference to the technological trends affecting contemporary China. Topics will include: Chinese cyberspace and the Great Fire Wall; the revolutionary potential of microblogs; hacking; gaming; the ICT economy, maker innovations and machine intelligence.

This course is designed to introduce contemporary media industries in China, involving print, broadcasting, film, PR, advertising, and new media. This course reviews the structures, functions, and influences of various forms of media industries. Practical media work is emphasized. Additionally, it analyzes existing issues on these media industries from historical, regulatory, social, and technological perspectives.

Sample Syllabus

Requires departmental approval prior to registration. Open only to NYU Media, Culture, & Communication students. Interested MCC students should contact Jonathan Martinez jm4599@nyu.edu

Sydney

This course examines diverse issues and perspectives related to global media. Historical and theoretical frameworks will be provided to enable students to approach the scope, disparity and complexity of current developments. These frameworks will be supplemented with the latest media news and developments. In short, we ask: what the heck is going on in the hyper-turbulent realm of blogs, Buzzfeed and The Sydney Morning Herald?

Students will be encouraged to assess shifts in national, regional and international media patterns of production, distribution and consumption. The aim is to come to an understanding of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Key concepts examined include: the advent of social media; the radical implications of globalisation; the disruption of established information flows and emergence of new information channels; the ethics, law and regulation of modern media; and trends in communication and information technologies. Issues addressed include: the rise of celebrity culture; the challenges facing the entertainment industry; and the rise, rise and potential demise of Rupert Murdoch. The focus will be international, with an emphasis on Australia.

Ultimately, the course will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a paradigm shift, as demonstrated by the Arab spring and the creeping dominance of Google, Facebook and Twitter. In other words: students, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.

Sample Syllabus


Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Florence

Wielding nearly unlimited authority over the lives - and the after-life – of millions of Europeans, the Catholic Church was by far the most important political, as well as cultural, power of the Middle Ages. The only global institution of this era, the Church was at the same time able to nourish strong local roots: its cardinals and popes came from all over the continent and dealt with international politics at the highest level, while priests and friars brought home to the people a faith tied to the neighborhood church and confraternity, and personified by a saint’s shrine and relics.Through a combination of lectures, students’ presentations, films and site visits, this course will explore selected aspects of the Medieval Church’s history: its often rocky relations with the other supreme power of the time, the Holy Roman Empire; the rise of monasticism and its different versions; the spread of heretical movements and their repression by the Inquisition; sainthood, and how “heavenly” women and men could serve to articulate very earthly ideologies on state, society, gender roles. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course presents an overview of the political, social, and cultural history of Italy from roughly 1300 to 1600. Its aim is to provide students with a basic understanding of the forces and processes that shaped the states and the societies of the Italian peninsula in an era of extraordinary changes: from the developments of urban civilization and the rise of humanism in the fourteenth and early fifteenth century, to the political and religious crisis of the late Quattrocento and early Cinquecento, and finally to the establishment of a new balance of power and a new cultural climate in the course of the sixteenth century. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus


Metropolitan Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Accra

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.

This course is designed to prepare and support students undertaking an internship at an NGO in Ghana. This weekly seminar will introduce students to key concepts and debates in the field of development studies, as well as provide a space to raise questions and reactions to the internship experience. We will survey foundational and current texts that elaborate theories and functions of development, with a focus on the recent history of social and economic development approaches in Africa. Charting the transition from public to private development institutions, the readings will provide critical insights into rights-based approaches, gender equity and empowerment, sustainability, accountability, and the role of government.

In addition to exploring theoretical frameworks, we will devote significant class time to discussing student experiences at their internships. Students will identify and critically appraise different aspects of their organization: their mission, methodology, programs, relationship with various stakeholders, and philosophy of change. By bringing both academic and practical perspectives to bear on the role civil society plays in capacity-building and improvement of livelihoods, this course offers an integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to the questions ‘What is development?’, ‘Who is the subject of development?’ and ‘Does it work?’ These questions cannot be answered by looking at theory or practices in isolation. By reflecting on how theory and practice shape each other, we will explore the rich history of debate and innovation in the field to deepen our understanding of the development context in Ghana.

This course will be the academic component of your internship experience. You will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on your internship as a way to further your academic goals. You will be asked to evaluate various aspects of your internship site, including but not limited to its mission, approach, policies, and the local, regional and international contexts in which it operates. You will also be asked to reflect critically on the state of the contemporary workplace and on ourselves as workers. You will be graded on the academic work produced in this course. 

Sample Syllabus

This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Sample Syllabus

Counter to the prevailing view of a rural African living in traditional communities, the majority of Africans are rapidly becoming urban dwellers. African cities are fast joining the ranks of mega-cities, global market hubs and centers for political and cultural exchange. This phenomenon raises important questions that form the basis for this course. Are these cities merely the products of globalization, or do their roots lie in pre-colonial tradition? Are global cities a new phenomenon in Africa, or can we find traces of earlier international links? What factors define the spatial geography and political economy of urban Africa? What challenges do African governments face in managing the city? How has the architecture and the arts of the African city been influenced by external connections?

This course examines those factors that have shaped Accra throughout history. While the emphasis of the course is on Accra, the course also introduces the main theoretical debates across disciplinary fields in the comparative study of the city. Students will be challenged to utilize primary resources such as national archives and special collection libraries, maps, and various cultural resources to address some of the questions being posed.

Sample Syllabus

Berlin

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

Sample Syllabus

This course examines diverse current urban trends in Berlin and their connections to worldwide phenomena. It focuses on the way that different social groups (according to class, milieu, origin, gender or sexuality) appropriate urban space and constitute place-specific identities. It uses the city of Berlin with its multiple layers of history as a laboratory for contemporary urban research with historical, empirical and theoretical material. We will study key debates on urban developments, partly as field visits, in regard to housing, migration, gentrification, and we will search for the creative and the sustainable city. You will be introduced to the contemporary discourses on those trends and to new
ways of reading and seeing a city.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

Urban culture is complex, fantastic, frightening, and a part of daily life, encompassing everything from the opera to street musicians, the public library to the piazza, the theater to local cafes and social clubs. This course, where cities are considered to be sources of cultural invention, explores through literature, history, social science and student experience, the evolution of high and popular culture, both modernist and post-modern. Emphasis will be placed on how cultures create bonds between specific interest groups, and how culture becomes the arena for acting out or resolving group conflict. This course will focus on Italian cities, including Florence. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

London

An urban centre for nearly two millennia, London has both shaped and been shaped by processes stretching over ever widening geographical scales, to claim its place within a select network of cities that are said to command contemporary globalisation. This course explores London’s evolving global reach, examining its role in key economic, social, political, cultural and spatial processes and identifying the effects that these have in turn had in its own urban life and landscape. The course briefly documents London’s establishment as an outpost of the Roman Empire in early history to its rise as the politico-administrative heart of the British Empire, to focus on London’s emergence as a global city. Largely oriented by the work of Human Geography scholars, the course examines the unravelling of London’s global connections through concepts such as urban space and place, globalisation, spatial division of labour, networks and flows, migration, transnationalism and multiculturalism.

The course is based on a mix of lectures and student-led seminars, and also includes a guided city walk and a museum visit. Lectures by the course convenor address the key themes of the weekly programme. Students are required to read designated texts for the week ahead. In seminars, students present and discuss their findings from different learning activities (readings, field walk, museum visit, their personal experience of London, lectures). Students are expected to participate actively in learning activities, especially seminars, and their participation constitutes one assessment component. 

Sample Syllabus

Shanghai

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Application information available here. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite. 

Sample Syllabus

The main aim of this course is to facilitate a rich engagement with Shanghai. The underlying premise is that the city is a critical site of globalization. Rather than view globalization as an external force acting on Shanghai, this course aims instead to show how globalization is inherent in the city and that an investigation of the distinctive features of Shanghai -- from the abandoned factories now revived as creative clusters, to the lilong architecture, luxury malls and street peddlers -- sheds light on both the past and future of globalization.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

 

 

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Washington, DC

For the first time in world history, the number of people living in urban areas exceeds the number of people living in rural areas. In acknowledging the urgent demands of our urban present and future, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of contemporary cities. Because projections show that most population growth will continue to take place in and around cities, this course makes the case for sustainable development as a way to mitigate the impacts of human growth. We will explore what is, and what could be, by discussing these themes: urban sprawl, slums and slum typology, green urban planning, air and water quality, new paradigms for energy/water/waste infrastructure, green building, sustainable materials, and whole systems design. We will consider how to measure sustainability and discuss the effectiveness of sustainability indicators. We will examine governance structures, social entrepreneurship, and the power of information technology and social networks in promoting sustainable development and the diffusion of ideas. We will also highlight the transformative role of art and culture in our sustainable urban future.

Sample syllabus (PDF)


Middle Eastern Studies

London

This course explores the origins of Islam and the development of its rituals and doctrines to the 21st century. It assumes no previous background in Islamic studies. Students will learn about topics such as the Koran and the Prophet, Islamic law, the encounter of East and West during the Crusades, and Islam in Britain. They will find out how Muslims in different regions have interpreted and lived their religion in past and present. Readings will include not only scholarly works but also material from primary sources, for example the Koran, biographies and chronicles. The course consists of a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, field trips and includes other media, such as film. 

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: Does not count toward the major or minor in Middle Eastern Studies.

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Sample Syllabus


Madrid

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100.

From the 8th century until the 17th century, Islam played a crucial role in the history of the Iberian Peninsula. Today this period is often portrayed as one of inter-religious harmony, while al-Andalus is simultaneously mourned in contemporary Islamist discourse as a lost paradise. While we look at the history of Al-Andalus and assess the importance of the contributions of Al-Andalus to Europe and America, we evaluate the significance of its legacy in modern Spain. Furthermore, we will study the protagonist role that Spain has played in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic countries during the Modern Age. Students will gain further understanding and contextualization of current Arab-Muslim geopolitics. As a case study, we will address the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, as well as its ensuing process of decolonization and the consequences that shape the current international relations between the two neighboring countries, Spain and Morocco.

Note:  This Class does NOT currently include a trip to Morocco as in past semesters.

Sample Syllabus

Tel Aviv

Note: Students planning to continue to Elementary Arabic II are advised to defer Elementary Arabic I until the Fall in New York, followed by Elementary Arabic II in the spring.  Elementary Arabic II is not offered in New York during the fall semester.

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca.

Based on students' previous knowledge of Arabic (the alphabet, phrase structure, basic nominal and verbal sentences, basic verbal tenses and some knowledge of cases and moods) the course will enhance students' vocabulary, proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and hearing the language, and make them familiar with various special morphological and syntactic structures (relative clauses, the comparative and superlative, patterns of broken plurals, diptotes and more).

The class is conducted in Modern Standard Arabic. The focus is on all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. There is a written home-work assignment every lesson. Attendance at all Arabic language classes is mandatory. You are expected to come to class prepared and to use Arabic in class to the full extent of your abilities. All quizzes and exams must be taken at their designated times. 

NYU Politics majors can petition to have this course count for elective credit.

More than 30 years have passed since 1979, the year when a self-styled Islamic Revolution unfolded in Iran. Historian Eric J. Hobsbawm branded this revolution as "one of the central social revolutions of the twentieth century"; and social scientist Richard Cottam described it as perhaps "the most popular revolution in the history of mankind." Whatever the case may be, we are now permitted to use the benefit of hindsight to revisit the 1979 revolution. In the first part of the course we will review the manifold causes of the 1979 revolution in a historical perspective, tracing the social, political, economic and cultural bases of the rise of the revolutionary movement and political Islam (or Islamism) in Iran. We will then move on to situate the revolution in a global context. This will enable us to examine Iranian history since 1979 in comparative perspective as well as to integrate the revolution into the "entangled histories" of modernity of which it is part. At the same time we will examine the cultural dimensions of the post-1979 state in Iran. We will consider cultural production in the Islamic Republic of Iran as a site of state domination and oppositional resistance. We will suggest that the Islamic Republic is a "scopic regime," developing a symbolic Islamism as a tool of propaganda and hegemony. At the same time, literature, cinema, and the visual arts have been sites of resistance.

Sample Syllabus


Music (CAS)

Buenos Aires


When taught in Spanish section: Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU SPAN-UA 100 Advanced Grammar & Composition or equivalent.)

A journey through the different styles of Latin American Popular Music (LAPM), particularly those coming from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. Their roots, influences and characteristics. Their social and historical context. Their uniqueness and similarities. Emphasis in the rhythmic aspect of folk music as a foundation for dance and as a resource of cultural identity. Even though there is no musical prerequisite, the course is recommended for students with any kind and/or level of musical experience.

The course explores both the traditional and the contemporary forms of LAPM Extensive listening/analysis of recorded music and in-class performing of practical music examples will be primary features of the course. Throughout the semester, several guest musicians will be performing and/or giving clinic presentations to the class. A short reaction paper will be required after each clinic. These clinics might be scheduled in a different time slot or even day than the regular class meeting, provided that is no time conflict with other courses for any of the students.

Sample Syllabus (English)

Sample Syllabus (Spanish) - Not offered in Spanish in Fall 2015 or Spring 2016

Florence

The course covers the evolution of Italian opera from its beginnings in Florence to the early 20th century with special emphasis on Monteverdi, Rossini, Donizetti, Verdi and Puccini. The approach is multidisciplinary and aims at a comprehensive survey of the music theatre in the context of the Italian cultural heritage. Literary sources, musico-dramatic features, vocal styles are studied in connection with major works that best represent trends and genres in the Italian operatic tradition. Students are expected to master the distinctive characteristics of such genres as favola in musica, intermezzo, opera seria, opera buffa, grand opera, dramma lirico, and the basic elements of Italian versification. Students listen to and watch recorded operas and attend performances in Florence or other Italian cities. Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus

Prague

An overview of the major trends in classical music of the last 100 years in the West, with a special focus on the musical development in Bohemia and Moravia. The musical culture will be put in context of the broader cultural and political development in Central Europe. A. Schönberg and the Viennese School, I. Stravinsky and the musical Paris between the wars, Bartók, Janácek, Martinu, Messiaen, Cage, post-war serialism, electronic music, minimalism, and other topics will be covered. Students are supposed to gain a good aural knowledge of the music discussed. 

Sample syllabus


Music and Performing Arts (Steinhardt)

Prague

Open to Music majors and other students by placement audition. Non-Steinhardt music majors should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll.

Study and performance of standard dance band literature, experimental jazz compositions, and student arrangements. 

 

For NYU Steinhardt Music Business students only; permission of Steinhardt music faculty required. Contact Catherine Moore catherine.moore@nyu.edu.

Assignment to record companies, music venues, management agencies, music industry-related firms for on-the-job training. s or other Written report, workshop, & orientation required. 

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

This course is required for music majors in piano. The main focus is the development of the specific repertoire as well as working on the related technical problems. One hour per week. (Includes Classical and Jazz styles).

 

No prerequisite.

One hour per week. (Includes classical and jazz styles). 

This course is required for Piano Performance majors, Music Education major with piano as their major instrument, and other music majors with extensive piano experience. The main focus is the development of sight-reading, transposition, and score reading skills. Special attention is given to Czech folk songs and Czech composers.

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

One hour per week. (Includes all string orchestral instruments and guitar, classical and jazz styles).

 

Prerequisite: MPATC-UE 7, Aural Comprehension II, or success in placement exam
Corequisite: MPATC-UE 9037, Music Theory III

Aural Comprehension III is a one-credit course, building on the foundations you have created in AC I and II. The two weekly class sessions will be devoted to group work in sight-singing and dictation: melodic, rhythmic and harmonic -- and in listening to longer segments of work to sharpen your perception of musical form. You will be expected to keep up a regular practice of these skills outside of class. In addition, we will arrange tutorials (at least three per semester) for individual work and assessment.

The musical materials of AC III will be taken mostly from 19th-century sources, reinforcing your work in Music Theory and Music History III. We will also work with more chromatic music of the 18th century, as well as jazz, popular music and relevant world cultures.

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

Composition in all forms and styles including electronic. Electronic laboratory by assignment. One hour per week. (Includes traditional, music theatre, film scoring and jazz).

 

Prerequisite:  Music Theory I and Music Theory II, or success in placement exam
Corequisite: MPATC-UE 9008, Aural Comprehension in Music III

In this course students will follow up with their harmony studies. We will go through harmonic instances of advanced chromaticism of the late 19. century and up to the very edge of tonality. Emphasis will be put on assignments and exercises in order to develop good creative and analytical  skills in harmony. Concurrently we will examine the main formal principles of tonal music and apply  our knowledge in analysis of selected compositions. We will use various analytical approaches and  test them on a large scale of historical musical material. Every student will be due to realize at least one analysis of assigned composition during the semester.

Sample syllabus

An exploration of 19th Century musical styles, chiefly romanticism, through the works of composers from 1790-1880.
Desired Outcomes:

  • Students will be able to recognize, describe, and discuss features of romantic style.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the origins of romanticism including the
    differences from Classical style as manifest in musical practice.
  • Students will be able to recognize, identify, and discuss works typical of the romantic period
    including symphony, symphonic poem, concerto, opera, lied (song), and solo/chamber works
    including the sonata and string quartet.

Sample syllabus

Open to Music majors and other students by placement audition. Non-Steinhardt music majors should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll.

Study and performance of chamber music. 

 

This course is designed to introduce the student to contemporary practices of creating and presenting electroacoustic music from the practical perspectives of analyzing works and understanding current technologies and aesthetic paradigms. In addition to musicological issues, composition will be placed in the wider context of contemporary art and New Media practices. This is a composition class that uses a music appreciation format to teach music creation today.Practical compositional lectures by Michal Rataj will focus on the analysis of a few key works, each dealing with specific aspects of music and technology and individual compositional approaches. Eric Rosenzveig will present theoretical classes providing an overview, background and competing theories from the varied perspectives of the artist, philosopher, technologist, musician and composer. We will try and look at the question “why” in addition to “how” to make a new work. We'll listen to many shorter works in class, to provide context to our discussions.

Note: This is not a 'software class'. Tools are secondary to concepts, history, philosophy and compositional methods.

Sample Syllabus

For NYU Steinhardt Music Technology students only; permission of Steinhardt music faculty required. Contact Kenneth Peacock kp3@nyu.edu for permission to enroll.

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email sarah.coffey@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll.

Private or group lessons (by examination) in woodwind and brass instruments, supplemented by extra assignments, outside practice, and observation. Required attendance at recitals. One hour per week. (Includes all woodwind and brass instruments, classical and jazz styles).

 

No prerequisite. Private lessons are restricted to Music Majors only. Students may only register for one private lesson per semester. Music majors from visiting schools should email marta.fleischhansova@nyu.edu to request permission to enroll. 

One hour per week. (Includes classical, music theatre and jazz styles).

Religion is without doubt one of the most important elements that shaped the history and contemporary face of Central Europe. Religion played an important role in the political and cultural development of this part of the world. The history of the mutual interaction between religion and politics is evident in the cultural richness of this part of the world, particularly in Bohemia and Prague.

This course explores various religious phenomena that formed political ideas and cultural values of this region indifferent historical periods. We examine particularly those religious characteristics and figures that remarkably influenced the world's history and enriched human thinking. First, we study the Christianization of Central European society and the prominent role of religion in the political and cultural transformation of the medieval period. Then we follow the religious reformation process and development of the relationship between Judeo-Christian tradition and the secular world in the early modern period. Finally, we explore the policies of communist regimes in the spheres of religion and culture and study the struggle of Christian churches against communist totalitarianism. The transformation of Catholicism in the 1960s is also examined together with the role of religion in post-communist society.

Excursions to significant historical and religious sights are an important part of the course.

Sample syllabus
 


Nutrition

Accra

The course is designed to enhance students’ awarenessof the multifaceted nature of nutrition problems across the globe and the needfor holistic approaches to methods to address them including research. Thecourse will review the UNICEF malnutrition structure within the context oflivelihood frameworks to demonstrate the linkages between health, nutrition andagriculture. Food security issues and impacts on nutrition and developmentalissues will be discussed. The course will also discuss the trends ofglobalization and the nutritional implications. The fact that the intensity andeffects of globalization are experienced differently across different nations,social classes, cultures, and genders will be stressed. The course will furtherreview key concepts and debates regarding nutrition transition, infant andyoung child feeding, women, aging and health.  

Sample Syllabus

 

 

 


Philosophy

London

This is an introduction to some central questions, perplexities and concepts within the main areas of philosophy, introducing themes from metaphysics, epistemology and ethics. Some extracts from some classic texts will be engaged – Plato, Descartes and John Stuart Mill, for example – and contemporary approaches will be addressed. Questions include: What am I? Is free will an illusion? What is knowledge? Is belief in God rational? and Whom ought I to save? In discussing these questions, important distinctions will be introduced and there will be attention to rigorous argument, including the nature of deductively sound argument.

The classes will involve informal instruction and discussion, with a focus upon clarity and argument over a range of topics, though also, it is hoped, with a lightness of touch.

Sample Syllabus

Introduces students to the fundamental theoretical questions of moral philosophy, with attention to both classic and contemporary readings. We will address questions such as: What is the nature of values? Is there such a thing as ethical knowledge? Why should we act morally? How do we decide what morality demands of us in a situation? Note that this is not a course is what is sometimes called ‘applied ethics’. 

Sample Syllabus


Photography

Florence

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice, covering the theoretical connections between architecture and photography. Through course assignments students will learn to confront a variety of challenges presented by photographing different architectural styles. By the end of the course, each student will have produced a portfolio of architectural photography.

This is an intermediate photography course. Each student must have basic knowledge of digital photographic techniques and their own SLR digital camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed, as well as a flash drive to backup your work. The course is a combination of lectures and labs for a total of six hours per week.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Photo I or equivalent. An analog or a digital camera with manual settings is required. Students registering for this course must also register for Directed Projects Lab  (0 points).

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

Florence can be considered the historic capital of optics: as the leading center for the production of lenses and spectacles in the Renaissance, it was also a center for extraordinary experimentation regarding the science of vision.  The experiments and writings of such masters as Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Giovan Battista della Porta and Galileo, among others, are testimony to the extraordinary contributions made here to the understanding of sight and to the development of devices that aided, altered or controlled vision for artistic purpose.

This course proposes to contextualize historic photographic techniques within this rich context of the history of optics.  An invaluable resource for this exploration will be the Acton Photograph Archive at Villa La Pietra with its rich collection of stereographs, daguerrotypes, ambrotypes, silver prints and albumen prints.  Students will thus be able to learn about these historic techniques by examining firsthand surviving, in some cases extremely rare, examples of them.

Following the inspiration of these historic techniques, from the experiments of the Florentine Renaissance artists to those of the Alinari Brothers, a firm founded in Florence in the nineteenth century and renowned throughout the world as an early innovator in the uses and techniques of photography, students will have the opportunity to explore these techniques themselves hands on.  They will be encouraged to develop their individual expression through their own projects employing one or more of these historic photographic techniques.  This inspiring course on experimental photography explores new possibilities of imagemaking by combining pinhole and toy cameras and other alternative techniques with a theoretical approach to representation.

Sample Syllabus

 A digital SLR camera is required.

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Students should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

The course Photojournalism: Exploring Italian Society focuses on the contemporary life of Florence, a city best known as a UNESCO World Heritage site, but that is also a European city attempting to rise to the challenges that currently confront other urban environments throughout Europe and the world. The course draws its strengths from the unique resources of the program and the city of Florence. From Italian labor protests, to commemoration of historic events, to immigrant populations, mass transit and tourism, Florence has many compelling contemporary visual stories to tell. Students have the unique opportunity to capture these issues in images.

Sample Syllabus


Physics

London

Pre-requisite: MATH-UA 121: Calculus I or equivalent, or completion of the Mathematics for Economics I and II sequence (MATH-UA 211 and 212), or permission of the instructor. Lecture, laboratory, and recitation. Not open to students who have completed Physics I (PHYS-UA 91) with a grade of C-minus or better.

Students should note that the Physics lab takes place at King's College in Waterloo. This is roughly a 30 minute bus journey from the academic centre.

This course begins a two-semester introduction to physics (lecture and laboratory-recitation) intended primarily for preprofessional students and for those majoring in a science other than physics. Topics include kinematics and dynamics of particles; momentum, work, and energy; gravitation; circular, angular, and harmonic motion; mechanical and thermal properties of solids, liquids, and gases; heat and thermodynamics. 

Sample Lecture Syllabus

Sample Lab Syllabus


Politics

Berlin

This course provides a survey of the intellectual traditions from classic to modern political thought in the West. Our exploration of political theory will proceed from a close reading and analysis of seminal texts that are presented both conceptually and, for the most part, chronologically. The primary focus will be placed on examining the historical antecedents of some of the foundational concepts and practices that distinguish our political behavior and institutions today. While taking account of the historical complexities and stylized conventions of each text, the course will highlight the recurrent themes that animate these influential writings and continue to shape our contemporary understanding of politics. In particular, the lectures and discussions will be geared towards tracing the conceptual underpinnings of current forms of political organization, such as the nation-state and liberal democracy, and their effects on the concerns of law, justice and morality. Some of the critical issues to be discussed include the divergent views of human nature and ideal society, the structure of authority and sovereignty, states of emergency, the defense of liberty, equality and justice, and the different models of democratic practice.

Sample Syllabus 

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrangements were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narratives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During museum visits and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to integrate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

Sample Syllabus

This course aims to provide an overview of the history, structure, functions, processes and current issues of European integration with a particular emphasis on the role of Germany both as to its influence on the EU and the Europeanisation of its own political system. European Integration is understood in this course to mean the co-operation, which EU Member states organize in the framework of the Union, and the direction in which this co-operation evolves. For these twenty-eight diverse countries, integration constitutes an increasingly essential component and extension of their own state structure. It permits them to conceive of, to decide on, and to carry out a growing number of important state tasks in common, and under the roof of the European Union. You will consider the milestones of postwar European integration. You will analyze the institutions, procedures and instruments of European integration as well as major EU policies and the distribution of competencies between Member States and Union. And you will get acquainted with theoretical models to explain the nature of European integration up to the present.

Sample Syllabus

Buenos Aires

The course is a historical and a topical approach to the international relations of Latin America.

1) The first section is divided analytically in two:
1.1. The first and briefest is an introduction and an overview to the main theories of international relations: realism, liberalism and constructivism. Theory will provide a common language for the class and patterns to order and interpret reality.


1.2. The second part is historical. We will cover the history of the international system and the history of Latin America, bridging both processes looking for divergences and convergences. We will review the patterns of insertion of Latin America in the broader global system and the influences of the system in the region. We begin at the so called “discovery” and journey through colonial times and the national organization period. Then we go into the XX century and the impact of the World Wars and the Great Depression. After that, the Cold War as the organizing paradigm in world affairs and how it was anything but Cold in Latin America. We then move to the end of the Cold War, the “New World order” and the rise of the neoliberal order. The last period we cover is from 2001 onwards. We will explore the transformations in American foreign policy, the rise of new powers in the world and the backlash against the Washington consensus in the region, the new left and the rise of the merging countries. We conclude by at the same time looking back and ahead. At this stage we will be able to unearth recurrent patterns and identify breaks with the past, always looking for its causes and implications.

2) The second part of the program is topical. We will analyze here the main issues in the international agenda and how are they perceived from Latin America. How are they incorporated into the regional agenda? How and to what extent are they taken into account in the national foreign policies? We will cover a wide array of topics such as poverty, inequality, climate change, terrorism, trafficking, drugs, energy and natural resources. What are the areas of coincidence between the global and the Latin American agenda? What does Latin America bring into the international agenda? We will be examining the mutual interaction and the interdependent effects in the context of globalization.

Sample Syllabus

Florence

This course explores the role of the US in Europe from the end of World War II to the present with a particular emphasis on understanding the sources of cooperation and conflict. The topics covered in the first part will include the US vision of the new international order, the end of the old European balance of power, the Cold War and the division of Europe, the building of the Western alliance, the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. The second part of the course will concentrate on contemporary issues ranging from the evolution of NATO to trade relations and the role of the dollar and the euro in the international monetary system. Particular attention will also be given to the challenges posed by the ‘war on terror’, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

In our society the need for deep understanding of what is going on translates into a need to keep track what has happened, how to outline trends, plan the future knowing the present or the past. We have all heard about demographic pressure, social policies, health care planning, inflation, market volatility: these are all concepts which rely heavily on statistical information. Changes have to be managed properly and in an informed way: scientific experiments be they on a medicine, on fertilizer or airbags must be planned as to ensure their validity. Total quality in production is a statistics-based philosophy of management, and if you like a commercial it is also because a statistician has provided information about consumer tastes and behaviour. In this course we will provide an introduction to the tools of statistics but most importantly we will try and understand the rationale behind statistics.

Sample Syllabus

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

Presents a study of post-World War II Italian politics and society in comparative and historical perspective. Seeks explanations of Italian political development in specific historical factors such as the 19th century patterns of state formation and the experience of fascism. Comparative analysis seeks to show how the social structure, political culture, and party systems have shaped Italy's distinct development. Current and recurrent political issues include the problem of integrating the south into the national economy and state response to social movements, particularly terrorism. Conducted in English.

Sample syllabus.

The European Union is a unique and strange entity.  It has 27 states and 500 million people. Its GNP is more or less equal to that of the USA. Many of its members share a common currency and a common monetary policy.  Yet it is a union without a state. The spectacular progress in the area of economic integration has not been matched by the creation of a common government and a common identity.  The economic giant is still a political dwarf as it has been confirmed time and again whenever there is an international crisis,. Yet so far this strange entity has been working. Its achievements in the economic arena have been remarkable. The course will analyze in an interdisciplinary fashion the making of the Union, its institutions, its policies and its prospects in the very challenging environment of today.  Probably more so than in any other period in its history the survival of the Union, as we have known it, will be tested by the impact of the most serious crisis of the post-war period.  Particular attention will be given to the new economic governance established by the Union in responding to the problems posed by the poor economic and financial performance of some of its members, i.e. the PIGS (Portugal, Ireland, Greece, Spain). Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Comparative study of the main features of Western European political systems, with a special attention to current politics. Analyzes both political institutions and societal groups, referring to the social and political history of the single countries. Presents challenges and changes in today’s Western European democracies. Attempts to introduce the basic concepts and categories of comparative political analysis. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

This course will introduce students to the study of comparative politics, which is defined as the study of domestic politics anywhere in the world.  As a way of cutting into this vast topic, we specifically focus on the process of democratic transition by analyzing the democratic revolution that has swept the globe during the last thirty-five years. In turn we will explore the causes of democratization, threats to democratization, and factors that may aid in a successful consolidation of democracy. As part of this process, students will be exposed to a wide range of topics in comparative politics, including theories of democratic transitions, the politics of economic reform, voting, parties, and electoral systems, and theories of ethnic conflict.

Please note: this course fulfills the requirement for a “core” course for Politics majors, the first time such a course has been offered at NYU-Florence, and is taught by Professor Tucker, who normally teaches the course in New York. As such, it is to date the only opportunity *anywhere* to take a politics core course in a small class format.  As an introductory course, it is also perfectly appropriate for non-politics majors as well.

Sample Syllabus

 

London

Introduction to the politics and society of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Traces the political and social development of the historic countries of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales; the growth of British hegemony and imperialism; the politics of decline and decay; and the promise of rebirth. Studies contemporary political institutions and processes that have undergone massive transformation over the past 50 years. Examines the continuing conflict and terrorism in Northern Ireland and dynamics of change in the Thatcher era and beyond.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines politics and governments in the East European region since the end of the Cold War against the background of wars, revolution, state building and collapse throughout the previous century. It surveys a broad sweep of countries – from Russia to the Czech Republic, and from the Baltic states to former Yugoslavia. It highlights the challenges of development faced by their peoples, how these challenges were met by governments and societies in the new states created after the First World War, under Communism in the Soviet Union and its satellite states, before and after the collapse of the Soviet bloc.

Sample Syllabus

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Sample Syllabus

This course critically investigates European integration, the operation of the EU as a political system and European policies. The course explores the origins, development, institutions, major policies, policy-making, current problems and matters of controversy of the European Community / Union. The major approaches applied to explain integration as well as the complex operation of the EU as a political system are described and discussed. The political and economic logic behind different national perspectives on European integration are examined.

Sample Syllabus

*Please Note: This course does not count towards the major or minor in International Relations.

Characteristics and conditions of war and peace and the transition from one to the other from the perspective of political and social science. Examines the role and use of coercion in global affairs, with emphasis on attempts to substitute negotiation, bargaining, market forces, politics, and law for the resort to massive violence in moderating disputes. Considers recent developments in both the theory and practice of peacebuilding demonstrating the differing ways in which particular conflicts tend to be viewed by participants, external commentators and policy-makers.  Students will also undertake their own research on a case study of conflict.

The course will be taught in the form of an informal lecture and a class discussion, and students will present preliminary versions of their case studies to the class. A visiting speaker from an organisation dealing with issues of violent conflict and peace will also participate in one of the sessions (to be arranged).

Sample Syllabus

Madrid

No Prerequisites if taught in English.

When Taught in Spanish: Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100 with permission of the director.

A study of Spain and its integration into the European Common Market. The historical background examines Europe in the aftermath of World War II, Spain under Franco's dictatorship and its relationship to other European countries, as well as the events leading up to the actual foundation of the European Economic Community (EEC). Emphasis is on the negotiations leading to Spain's incorporation into the EEC, and a detailed analysis is given of the present-day European Common Market and its goals for the future.

Sample Syllabus (Spanish Taught)

Sample Syllabus (English Taught)

This course examines the interaction between two coupled systems, the Earth system and humanity’s political systems. Beginning with an analysis of the effects of anthropogenic industrial carbon dioxide gas emissions on the Earth system as derived from the scientific evidence this course attempts to understand the reaction of the global, European and Spanish political governance systems to these transformations. In order to understand something as apparently specific as the impact of climate change in the Iberian peninsula and the Spanish state’s response to it we must first understand, therefore, how the United Nations and the European Union are responding to climate change since the Spanish political system’s control and mitigation policies are largely determined by these two larger governance systems’ responses.

Sample Syllabus 

Millions of lives around the world are impacted by natural disaster, war and other crises every year. Men, women and children are left homeless and vulnerable, and domestic infrastructure and institutions are often completely destroyed. Frequently, the people affected tend to live in countries that lack the autonomous capacities to pursue development without the assistance of international development agencies, foreign governments and NGOs. The development of a country requires a multi-layered approach, taking into account the diversity of failures caused by the crisis, the particularities of country related issues and, in most cases, the lack of development that already existed in the period preceding the crisis.International Development in Post Crisis Countries explores how countries develop in post-crisis periods and looks at the role of the international community in contributing to development. This course introduces students to a cross section of academic topics relevant to development, including, but not limited to, economic development, international relations, law and rule of law, human rights and gender studies. The majority of the course will focus on exploring each of these topic areas in depth, examining them from a wide array of theoretical perspectives and methodologies.

Sample Syllabus

Paris

The purpose of this seminar on European integration is to give the students a few keys in understanding what the European Union is and how it works; how it affects every day policies of the member states as well as the life of European citizens; what kind of world actor the EU is or might become; what political consequences the current financial crisis might have for the EU. Conducted in French.

Sample Syllabus

This course investigates the history, the structure and the inner logic and working of European integration from the end of the Second World War to present day. It will provide students with an overview of the political institutions, the member states and the current developments of the European Union while focusing on the paramount role played by France throughout the years. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Prague

This course will focus on the history of the culturally rich region of “Mitteleuropa” through analysis of the parallel evolution of Germany and the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary. Mitteleuropa as a region produced such important figures as Franz Kafka, Gustav Mahler, Sigmund Freud, Theodor Herzl and Milan Kundera; historical personalities whose influence internationally is indisputable. We’ll delve into the history of the region and on the central role played by German politics and culture from the end of the 19th century, through the turbulent 20th century to the present day. Emphasis will be on the evolution of the concept of nationalism as well as on Germany’s foreign policy in the “concert of nations”, especially towards its Eastern neighbors. The aim is to achieve an understanding of the complex evolution of national entities and their interaction between the birth of the modern German state and the integration of the Visegrád countries in NATO and the European Union. 

Sample syllabus

This course explores the recent history and the current state of political, economic and cultural relations between the United States and Europe. Ever since the end of the World War II, the cooperative relationship between these two parts of the world, often described as "The West", has been a bedrock of international stability, security and prosperity. After the end of the Cold War, this relationship has undergone changes, along with the whole system of international relations. Recently, on both sides of the Atlantic, the talk has been about a crisis of the Euro-American relationship. We will examine the validity of these claims, the causes of the current disagreements and possible ways of overcoming them. Throughout, we will emphasize the overwhelming nature of common values and interests on both sides of the Atlantic as well as the risks stemming from a potential rift for both Europe and America. We will examine the compatibility of current European and U.S. policies with respect to third countries or regions, such as Russia, the Middle East, China, and other parts of the Globe. We will also analyze the specific role played in this relationship by countries of Central and Eastern Europe as relative newcomers to democracy, to the Atlantic Alliance and to European Union.

Sample syllabus

This course is an introduction to the modern politics and government of Central and Eastern Europe from the beginning of the Twentieth Century to the present. We will examine several periods, including 1). The interwar period and the development of the first modern political systems; 2) World War II, German occupation and resistance, and official and unofficial political systems; 3). Sovietization and the adoption of non-democratic political system; 4). The Communist Era in Eastern & Central Europe; 5). Democratic transitions; 6) and the processes of democratic consolidation. The course uses a comparative approach, using a few basic theories of political science to analyze the Central & Eastern European case. Topics include types of political regimes, creation and breakdown of democratic systems, constitutions and state systems, political parties, elections etc.

Sample syllabus