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Neta conducts her research as a senior research associate at the laboratory of Prof. Uri Gophna at Tel Aviv University where she also holds a position as a part time lecturer. Her research focuses on horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and molecular ecology in halophilic archaeons, a class of the superkingdom Archaea that habitats the dead see as well as the Mediterranean see. Neta lives in Herzeliya with her husband and their three children
 

Previously, 2002's Yossi & Jagger, the love affair between two officers in the Israeli army, became an international breakout hit. Born in New York City, at an early age Fox moved with his family to Israel. He grew up in Jerusalem, then studied at Tel Aviv University's School of Film and Television. His first film, Time Off, a 45-minute drama about sexual identity in the Israeli army, won him acclaim and led to the making his first feature, Song of the Siren, a romantic comedy which became Israel's biggest box office success in 1994. He also created and directed the Israeli TV dramatic series Florentine, which examined the life of young people in Tel Aviv before and after the Rabin assassination. Fox ran the film program at the Alon high school for the arts in Ramat Hasharon and has taught filmmaking at Tel Aviv University's School of Film and Television as well as at Sapir and Beit Berel colleges.

In 2004 he joined the institute of chemistry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. Since 2010 he is Professor of Chemistry and the head of the school of chemistry at the Hebrew University. His major research interests are using peptides to study protein-protein interactions in health and disease, and developing peptides as drugs that modulate these interactions. Of particular interests are intrinsically disordered proteins and how to make them drug targets. Prof. Friedler won a starting grant from the ERC (European Research Council) as well as the outstanding young scientist prize by the Israeli Chemical Society. In 2012 he won the Rector prize for an excellent teacher and researcher at the Hebrew University.

He is a licensed tour guide and also works as copy editor in English and Hebrew, and as translator into Hebrew and English from Arabic and a number of other languages. Among his translations into Hebrew are former MK Azmi Bishara's story collection Wajd fi Bilad al-Hawajiz (from Arabic) and Freiherr Kress von Kressenstein's Mit den Tuerken zum Suezkanal (from German). Recently he was the translator of non-English entries of the new Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics published by Brill. 

His articles and book chapters on film theory, death in visual culture, American cinema, and Israeli cinema appear in New Review of Film and Television Studies, GLQ, Cinema Journal, Camera Obscura,Journal of Popular Film and Television, Psychoanalyse im Widerspruch, and elsewhere.

He is the author of The Poetry of Sa'di Yusuf; Between Homeland and Exile (Sussex Academic Press, 2006) and numerous scholarly articles on modern Arabic poetry and Arab literary heritage.

Aside from lecturing at the Department of Hebrew Language at NYU and Tel-Aviv University, Ruth has taken on various additional roles in the past, including: lecturing and building the curriculum of the Hebrew Department at the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) in NY, heading the Hebrew program at the World Zionist Organization (WZO) in NY, where she was responsible for training Hebrew teachers throughout the USA and managing the Ulpan program, as well as lecturing at Columbia University, Brandeis University and Boston University. She is also the author of the books: Structures in the Syntax of Hebrew Language (2001) and The Verb System for Intermediate levels (2007).

Ms. Rahimiyan is the recipient of several awards and fellowships, including a Fulbright Scholarship to study at Columbia University's Center for Iranian Studies, the Phyllis Greenberg Heideman and Richard D. Heideman Fellowship at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., The Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture International Doctoral Scholarship, Nathan Rotenstreich Scholarship from Ben-Gurion University, and a Vidal Sassoon International Center Scholarship. Ms. Rahimiyan contributed 42 entries on Judeo-Persian people and places to editor Norman Stillman's Encyclopedia of Jews in the Islamic World, and also appears in editor Ihsan Yarshater's Encyclopedia Iranica and editor Manocher Dorraj's Iran Today: An Encyclopedia of Life in the Islamic Republic.

She was born and raised in Israel and lived in the US for 11 years, in
the DC area with her family. She worked at George Washington
University teaching Hebrew courses in the Semitic Languages
Department. Her hobbies and interests include spending time with her
3 children, reading books and translating books and articles
from English to Hebrew.

Arik Sadan wrote both his MA and PhD theses under the supervision of Prof. Aryeh Levin, receiver of the Israel Prize for Linguistics (2010). Both theses deal with Arabic grammatical thought in general and the verbal system of Classical Arabic in particular. Having submitted his PhD thesis, Sadan traveled to Paris and Jena, Université Paris 7 and Friedrich-Schiller-Universität respectively, where he spent two years of post-doctoral research. His post-doctoral research project focuses on editing and analyzing an ancient treatise in the field of Arabic grammar which deals not only with grammar and syntax but also with Rhetoric and Logic, based on eleven different manuscripts. In 2012 Sadan published the scientific edition of this work with Harrassowitz Verlag, as well as a revised English version of his PhD thesis with Brill. Sadan’s research fields are Arabic grammatical thought, Arab grammarians, Classical, Modern and Colloquial Arabic linguistics, manuscripts in Arabic grammar and other fields. He teaches various courses in various academic institutions in these fields.

She completed her BA, MA and PhD in Archaeology at Tel-Aviv University (dissertation title: Towns in the Desert: Geographical, Economic and Sociopolitical Perspectives written under the direction of Prof. Israel Finkelstein and Prof. Nadav Na'aman). Her dissertation was followed by the final publication of the archaeological excavations from Tel 'Aroer. Both studies dealt with socio-political aspects of desert urbanism, imperial control strategies and local identity at the desert frontier.  Dr. Thareani's postdoctoral research is entitled: Between Israel, Aram and Assyria: Tel Dan in the Iron II. This research is aimed at clarifying the cultural response to various control strategies (empires and local kingdoms) and their reflection in the archaeological record. Finally, Dr. Thareani has supervised excavation fields at Beth-Shemesh and she currently co-directs the archaeological excavation at Tel Dan on behalf of the Nelson Glueck School of Biblical Archaeology.
 

His research specialization includes Czech-Israeli relations, modern Central European-Middle Eastern ties, Czechoslovak Jewish multilingual and interreligious history, history of sacred text translation, Bible translation, and theory of nationalism. His teaching focuses on the decoding of public space in Tel Aviv-Jaffa through "thick description."
 

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Faculty Spotlight

Eytan Fox

Eytan Fox is an acclaimed director and writer. He was born in New York City and at an early age, moved with his family to Israel. He grew up in Jerusalem, then studied at Tel Aviv University’s School of Film and Television. His first film, Time Off, a 45-minute drama about sexual identity in the Israeli army, won him acclaim and led to the making his first feature, Song of the Siren, a romantic comedy which became Israel's biggest box office success in 1994. He also created and directed the Israeli TV dramatic series Florentine, which examined the life of young people in Tel Aviv before and after the Rabin assassination. His 2002 film, Yossi & Jagger, about a love affair between two officers in the Israeli army, became an international breakout hit. He followed that film up with a sequel, Yossi, last year. His 2004 film Walk on Water - a story of a Mossad secret service agent who befriends the gay grandson of an ex-Nazi officer - has become the most successful Israeli film abroad. Fox ran the film program at the Alon high school for the arts in Ramat Hasharon and has taught filmmaking at Tel Aviv University's School of Film and Television as well as at Sapir and Beit Berel colleges.

View some of his work:

The Bubble Trailer

Yossi Trailer

 

 

Teaching in Tel Aviv

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