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Courses Spring 2015

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Spring 2015 courses with days and times will be available in Albert, NYU's Student Information System in mid October, 2014. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs during registration week.
  • All students are required to take a language class. Select one that matches your skill level.
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass/fail.
  • All NYU Tel Aviv courses are listed as TBA. Days and Times for NYU Tel Aviv courses will be determined after registration to accommodate student interest.
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades.
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • If you're wait-listing, don't forget to Swap. More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • Math and Science courses have prerequisites, visiting students email global.academics@nyu.edu for permission.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

  Spring 2014| Fall 2014| Spring 2015

 


Required Course for All Students

This course is designed to help you understand contemporary Israel – the society, its problems and its pre-occupations. Together with tours and special lectures, the first half of the course will focus on some historical background. (The facts are important, but no one in the Middle East agrees on “the facts.” In this part of the world, debates about the past have a huge impact on the present.) Without going too much into the past, we will examine the formative events of Israeli society, those events that explain the special features of Israel today – its politics, institutions, culture, popular thinking and more. The course will begin in 1948 and progress to contemporary issues, including the most controversial ones.


Language Courses

All students at NYU Tel Aviv will be required to take a course in either Hebrew or Arabic language. This course must be taken for graded credit.  (Not pass/fail.)  For native speakers or those who have already achieved an advanced level of proficiency, special arrangements will be made (e.g. direct enrollment in a pre-approved course at a local university, directed readings, or special tutorial sessions).

This course is designed for science majors coming to NYUTA without prior knowledge of Hebrew or Arabic. This course also fulfills the language requirement for Global Programs.

Is Israel a multilingual or a monolingual country? This is a question with which many educators, linguists, politicians and laypeople have been struggling. In this course we will explore several issues of language use and practice in Israel, language ideology and language policy.

We will start by learning the orthographies (spelling systems) of Hebrew and Arabic and practice them through the methodology of Linguistic Landscape. We will tour Tel Aviv-Jaffa and other places and study public signs and their use in Hebrew and Arabic as well as in other languages. We will look at signs, advertisements, instructions, buildings, streets, billboards, etc. This exercise will teach us much about the public space, who controls it and what cultural and political messages it sends us.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students planning to continue to Elementary Arabic II are advised to defer Elementary Arabic I until the Fall in New York, followed by Elementary Arabic II in the spring.  Elementary Arabic II is not offered in New York during the fall semester.

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca.

Continuation of Elementary Arabic I.

Continuation of Intermediate Arabic I.

Active introduction to modern Hebrew as it is spoken and written in Israel today. Presents the essentials of Hebrew grammar, combining the oral-aural approach with formal grammatical concepts. Reinforces learning by reading of graded texts. Emphasizes the acquisition of idiomatic conversational vocabulary and language patterns.

Continuation of Elementary Hebrew I.

Builds on skills acquired in Elementary Hebrew I and II and develops a deepening command of all linguistic skills. Modern literary and expository texts are read to expand vocabulary and grammatical knowledge, with conversation and composition exercises built around the texts. Introduces selections from Israeli media. Addresses the relationship between classical and modern Hebrew.

Continuation of Intermediate Hebrew I.

Aimed at training students in exact and idiomatic Hebrew usage and at acquiring facility of expression in both conversation and writing. Reading and discussion of selections from Hebrew prose, poetry, and current periodical literature.

Designed to provide a thorough grounding in Hebrew grammar with special emphasis on phonology, morphology, and syntax. Concentrated study of vocalization, accentuation, declensions, conjugations, and classification of verbs


Biology

For Biology Major Students only.  Course description coming soon.


Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 243, Organic Chemistry I or its equivalent

Students registering for this course must register for Lecture, Laboratory. & Recitation.

The aim of the course is to introduce advanced concepts in organic chemistry with particular emphasis on aromatic and carbonyl systems. Some simple aspects of biochemistry including carbohydrates will be discussed. The importance of spectroscopic techniques in organic chemistry will be emphasised.

Weekly 4 1/2 hr. laboratory session. A pre-lab session of 20 minutes will take place at the beginning of each practical class. Students will acquire the practical skills of Organic Chemistry and will become familiar with organic laboratory procedures and techniques.

Sample Lecutre Syllabus from NYU Sydney

Sample Lab Syllabus from NYU Sydney


Cinema Studies

A new film course is now offered through Hebrew and Judaic Studies (see below).


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning II includes both classroom instruction and community experience (whenever practicable, individual community experience). the principle goal of Experiential Learning II is immersion in the current and historical character of the site.

Hebrew and Judaic Studies

This course will take the students through the history and the various realities and challenges of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course aims to introduce the fundamental historical trajectories of the conflict, and to present and analyze the conflicting narratives and perceptions of both Palestinians and Israelis over key moments and issues in its history. By so doing, we will pay specific attention to the respective histories of the conflict, as well as to the challenges that each side is encountering over the future of the conflict and possible solutions to it. Among other issues, the course focuses on key moments in the history of Palestine during the British mandate; the conflicting narratives over the 1948 war; Israel and the Palestinians between 1948-1967; the 1967 war and its implications on Israel and the Palestinians; the development of the Palestinian national movement; the first and second Intifadas and the challenges to the Oslo peace process. The course will address these issues through a variety of readings, primary sources and films. As a conclusion, the students will present their own reflections and analyses of various aspects of the history of the conflict and debate its future implications.

Israeli Cinema has finally come of age. It has caught up with Israeli literature, scoring awards and world-wide recognition not only for its artistic achievements but also for its gutsy in-depth engagement with political, social, and sex-and-gender borders and boundaries that are local and universal at one and the same time. The course will explore some of these issues as they are tackled in contemporary cinema and fiction. Classes will be organized in three thematic clusters:

  • “Family, I Love and Hate You”
  • “The Political is Personal Too”: War, Terror, Self-sacrifice
  • Crossing the Lines: Trauma, Sex, Gender, Ethnicity

(This grouping is determined by what seems to be a work’s major theme, though most of works studied, and certainly the best among them, are bi- or multi-focal, crossing several boundaries of universal divisions.)

When appropriate, students will be asked to prepare relevant backgrounds materials – socio- historical studies, reviews, etc.
 


History

This course will take the students through the history and the various realities and challenges of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course aims to introduce the fundamental historical trajectories of the conflict, and to present and analyze the conflicting narratives and perceptions of both Palestinians and Israelis over key moments and issues in its history. By so doing, we will pay specific attention to the respective histories of the conflict, as well as to the challenges that each side is encountering over the future of the conflict and possible solutions to it. Among other issues, the course focuses on key moments in the history of Palestine during the British mandate; the conflicting narratives over the 1948 war; Israel and the Palestinians between 1948-1967; the 1967 war and its implications on Israel and the Palestinians; the development of the Palestinian national movement; the first and second Intifadas and the challenges to the Oslo peace process. The course will address these issues through a variety of readings, primary sources and films. As a conclusion, the students will present their own reflections and analyses of various aspects of the history of the conflict and debate its future implications.


Metropolitan Studies

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus


Middle Eastern Studies

This course will take the students through the history and the various realities and challenges of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course aims to introduce the fundamental historical trajectories of the conflict, and to present and analyze the conflicting narratives and perceptions of both Palestinians and Israelis over key moments and issues in its history. By so doing, we will pay specific attention to the respective histories of the conflict, as well as to the challenges that each side is encountering over the future of the conflict and possible solutions to it. Among other issues, the course focuses on key moments in the history of Palestine during the British mandate; the conflicting narratives over the 1948 war; Israel and the Palestinians between 1948-1967; the 1967 war and its implications on Israel and the Palestinians; the development of the Palestinian national movement; the first and second Intifadas and the challenges to the Oslo peace process. The course will address these issues through a variety of readings, primary sources and films. As a conclusion, the students will present their own reflections and analyses of various aspects of the history of the conflict and debate its future implications.


Politics

The purpose of this course is to examine key topics, major contributions, and recent advances in the study of democracy, dictatorship, and regime change. We will cover topics such as democracy origins, consolidation, transitions to democracy, democratization processes, origins of dictatorships, role of institutions in dictatorships, etc. We will first cover the theoretical foundations of each topic, and then we will give empirical examples.

While many countries in the international system are democratic, the quality of these democracies is questionable and varies considerably across them. Many in some of these democracies suffer from deep levels of corruption, poor elite accountability, human rights abuses and violations, and oftentimes policies that go against the very foundations of democratic governance. We will cover in the course the classic regime types (democracy, hybrid regimes, and dictatorship), transitions between them, and the strategies they (and their leaders) use to stay in power.

Sample Syllabus


Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv University (TAU) is Israel's largest higher education institution and is home to 30,000 students studying in the academic areas of science, humanities and the arts.  As of Spring 2014, NYU is pleased to make available a new opportunity for students enroll in a course for NYU credit at TAU. This exciting  opportunity will allow students to engage with local students in the classroom.

In its first two decades, Israel's history was dominated by intense and dramatic events. These early years in the nascent stage were characterized by wars, ongoing security problems, mass immigration and economic hardship, all of which brought political and social unrest.
The 1948 war left its remark on the entire population. Although the Jewish side was the victor, it suffered a massive loss of lives and damages to industry and economic achievements. In addition, the war ended with an unresolved Palestinian refugee problem and a significant Arab minority that remained within the borders of the Jewish state and subject to military administration.

The course will explore the cultural and ethnic groups that comprise Israeli society and show how they shaped Israeli collective identity. After the proclamation of the state of Israel in May 1948 a state had to be built. The political, economic and social institutions of Israel evolved from pre state institutions created during the rule of the British mandate over Palestine. The ideology of Mamlachtiyut (statism) was developed in order to mobilize the political system and a wide array of institutions.

This advance course in modern Jewish thought wishes to delve into the writings of prominent modern Jewish thinkers, by examining their readings and interpretations of several fundamental theological pillars of Judaism through the treatment thinkers such as Mendelssohn, Spinoza, Heschel, Cohen, Rosenzweig, Buber and Kook. 

Each double session will focus on one principal issue in traditional Jewish thought, first dealing with the relevant primary canonical sources, and then offering several modern interpretations and approaches to those texts and issues.  By doing so, the purpose of the course is twofold.  First, providing students with both preliminary knowledge of some of the most important and central agent Jewish sources.  Second, exposing students to the lively modern debate on these issues and to a plethora of interpretations on them.

If until the last third If until the last third of the twentieth century history mostly addressed the lives and deeds of “big men” –rulers, diplomats, generals, or inventors–historians have in recent
decades gradually broadened their perspective to include in their narratives women, the middle
and then lower classes, and eventually non-Western people as well. Along these lines, this course examines the history of the modern Middle East from the bottom up.

We will examine what made the nineteenth and twentieth centuries “modern” for the inhabitants of the region and what constituted their lived experience of the tumults of colonialism, nationalism and post-colonialism. Exploring case studies from Egypt, Israel/Palestine, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia among other settings, we will examine the shifting media infrastructures, cultural protocols, religious beliefs, class formations, and political agendas of different social groups in the region. Beyond reading recent and innovative academic literature on these issues, instruction will heavily rely on primary materials such as graffiti, cinema, music and recordings of religious materials, poetry and
short stories.

Button: Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester


Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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