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Courses Fall 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Fall 2014 courses with days and times will be available in Albert, NYU's Student Information System the week of March 31, 2014. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs during registration week.
  • All students are required to take a language class. Select one that matches your skill level.
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass/fail.
  • All NYU Tel Aviv courses are listed as TBA. Days and Times for NYU Tel Aviv courses will be determined after registration to accommodate student interest.
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades.
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • If you're wait-listing, don't forget to Swap. More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • Math and Science courses have prerequisites, visiting students email global.academics@nyu.edu for permission.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

Spring 2014| Fall 2014| Spring 2015

 


Required Course for All Students

This course is designed to help you understand contemporary Israel – the society, its problems and its pre-occupations. Together with tours and special lectures, the first half of the course will focus on some historical background. (The facts are important, but no one in the Middle East agrees on “the facts.” In this part of the world, debates about the past have a huge impact on the present.) Without going too much into the past, we will examine the formative events of Israeli society, those events that explain the special features of Israel today – its politics, institutions, culture, popular thinking and more. The course will begin in 1948 and progress to contemporary issues, including the most controversial ones.


Language Courses

All students at NYU Tel Aviv will be required to take a course in either Hebrew or Arabic language. This course must be taken for graded credit.  (Not pass/fail.)  For native speakers or those who have already achieved an advanced level of proficiency, special arrangements will be made (e.g. direct enrollment in a pre-approved course at a local university, directed readings, or special tutorial sessions).

Note: Students planning to continue to Elementary Arabic II are advised to defer Elementary Arabic I until the Fall in New York, followed by Elementary Arabic II in the spring.  Elementary Arabic II is not offered in New York during the fall semester.

Builds basic skills in modern standard Arabic, the language read and understood by educated Arabs from Baghdad to Casablanca.

Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Arabic, with increased emphasis on writing and reading from modern sources in addition to aural/oral proficiency. 

 

Professor Ali Al-Azhari
Course description coming soon.

Active introduction to modern Hebrew as it is spoken and written in Israel today. Presents the essentials of Hebrew grammar, combining the oral-aural approach with formal grammatical concepts. Reinforces learning by reading of graded texts. Emphasizes the acquisition of idiomatic conversational vocabulary and language patterns.

Continuation of Elementary Hebrew I.

Builds on skills acquired in Elementary Hebrew I and II and develops a deepening command of all linguistic skills. Modern literary and expository texts are read to expand vocabulary and grammatical knowledge, with conversation and composition exercises built around the texts. Introduces selections from Israeli media. Addresses the relationship between classical and modern Hebrew.

Continuation of Intermediate Hebrew I.

Aimed at training students in exact and idiomatic Hebrew usage and at acquiring facility of expression in both conversation and writing. Reading and discussion of selections from Hebrew prose, poetry, and current periodical literature.

Designed to provide a thorough grounding in Hebrew grammar with special emphasis on phonology, morphology, and syntax. Concentrated study of vocalization, accentuation, declensions, conjugations, and classification of verbs


Cinema Studies

The course will enrich the students’ understanding of Israeli Cinema as a microcosm of the young, vibrant, and continually changing Israeli state and society. We will analyze the cinematic expression of the themes behind the inception and evolution of the small yet multifaceted country, and note the differences between the cinema of the first and second wave of Israeli filmmakers.

Syllabus under revision


Dramatic Literature

The course will enrich the students’ understanding of Israeli Cinema as a microcosm of the young, vibrant, and continually changing Israeli state and society. We will analyze the cinematic expression of the themes behind the inception and evolution of the small yet multifaceted country, and note the differences between the cinema of the first and second wave of Israeli filmmakers.

Syllabus under revision


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Experiential Learning I includes both classroom instruction and community experience (whenever practicable, individual community experience). the principle goal of Experiential Learning I is immersion in the current and historical character of the site.

Sample Syllabus


Mathematics

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH-UA 121 Calculus I or the equivalent.

Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer’s rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms. 


Metropolitan Studies

 Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship field-site.

The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Israel's Civil Society. Israel is a country where the government and the establishment at large have historically been very central in determining the country's political direction as well as its social fabric and political culture. It is therefore of special interest to study the emergence of new players in Israel, especially the role of the Third Sector, or Civil Society and within it the even newer phenomenon of Social Change Organizations and their effect on Israeli political and social life over the past three decades. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency, its approach, its policies, its programs, and the context in which it operates. You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus


Middle Eastern Studies

NYU Politics majors can petition to have this course count for elective credit.

More than 30 years have passed since 1979, the year when a self-styled Islamic Revolution unfolded in Iran. Historian Eric J. Hobsbawm branded this revolution as "one of the central social revolutions of the twentieth century"; and social scientist Richard Cottam described it as perhaps "the most popular revolution in the history of mankind." Whatever the case may be, we are now permitted to use the benefit of hindsight to revisit the 1979 revolution. In the first part of the course we will review the manifold causes of the 1979 revolution in a historical perspective, tracing the social, political, economic and cultural bases of the rise of the revolutionary movement and political Islam (or Islamism) in Iran. We will then move on to situate the revolution in a global context. This will enable us to examine Iranian history since 1979 in comparative perspective as well as to integrate the revolution into the "entangled histories" of modernity of which it is part. At the same time we will examine the cultural dimensions of the post-1979 state in Iran. We will consider cultural production in the Islamic Republic of Iran as a site of state domination and oppositional resistance. We will suggest that the Islamic Republic is a "scopic regime," developing a symbolic Islamism as a tool of propaganda and hegemony. At the same time, literature, cinema, and the visual arts have been sites of resistance.

Sample Syllabus


Politics

International negotiation has become the most widely used means of conflict management in international affairs.  Negotiations of international significance are today conducted not only between individual states, but also within and beyond them. At the same time negotiation practice itself is undergoing much change with changing patterns of conflict and intervention, new urgent issues on the global agenda, new actors and new emerging norms.

This course provides an overview of negotiation and conflict resolution theories and practices of international importance – bilateral, regional and multilateral. The emphasis is on different approaches/aspects to understanding what drives the negotiation process and explains the outcome. Why do some negotiations succeed, while others keep failing? Why do some peace settlements succeed while others fail?  We will examine not only the official negotiation process but also the important functions of pre-negotiation, second-track diplomacy and post-agreement negotiations concerned with implementation and compliance. 

While we will give many examples from various civil and international conflicts, our main focus will be on two regional conflicts – Cyprus and the Arab-Israeli conflict.  There will also be guest lectures by some of those who were involved in peace negotiations in the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Sample Syllabus

The purpose of this course is to examine the relation between religion and public life in both western and non western societies. Recently, the question of the relation between religion and public life has come to the fore again, for several reasons. First, the Third Wave of Democratization in certain Catholic, Orthodox and non-Christian societies has raised the question of the relation between religion and democratic political culture. Second, the immigration of non-Christians to certain western, ”Christian“ nations has tended to underline the Christian foundations of those national states. And third, the resurgence of religious fundamentalism in many parts of the world has sharpened the question of the relation between religion and public life in still other societies. All of these developments cast doubt on traditional theoretical formulations about both the privatization of religion and the secularization of the state. It seems that religion plays an important role in the formation of regimes and political patterns; that religious establishments and religious communities are occasionally involved in political struggles; and that religions introduce powerful symbols of identification that often mobilize the public for political purposes.

Sample Syllabus 


Religious Studies

The purpose of this course is to examine the relation between religion and public life in both western and non western societies. Recently, the question of the relation between religion and public life has come to the fore again, for several reasons. First, the Third Wave of Democratization in certain Catholic, Orthodox and non-Christian societies has raised the question of the relation between religion and democratic political culture. Second, the immigration of non-Christians to certain western, ”Christian“ nations has tended to underline the Christian foundations of those national states. And third, the resurgence of religious fundamentalism in many parts of the world has sharpened the question of the relation between religion and public life in still other societies. All of these developments cast doubt on traditional theoretical formulations about both the privatization of religion and the secularization of the state. It seems that religion plays an important role in the formation of regimes and political patterns; that religious establishments and religious communities are occasionally involved in political struggles; and that religions introduce powerful symbols of identification that often mobilize the public for political purposes.

Sample Syllabus 


Sociology

The purpose of this course is to examine the relation between religion and public life in both western and non western societies. Recently, the question of the relation between religion and public life has come to the fore again, for several reasons. First, the Third Wave of Democratization in certain Catholic, Orthodox and non-Christian societies has raised the question of the relation between religion and democratic political culture. Second, the immigration of non-Christians to certain western, ”Christian“ nations has tended to underline the Christian foundations of those national states. And third, the resurgence of religious fundamentalism in many parts of the world has sharpened the question of the relation between religion and public life in still other societies. All of these developments cast doubt on traditional theoretical formulations about both the privatization of religion and the secularization of the state. It seems that religion plays an important role in the formation of regimes and political patterns; that religious establishments and religious communities are occasionally involved in political struggles; and that religions introduce powerful symbols of identification that often mobilize the public for political purposes.

Sample Syllabus 


Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv University (TAU) is Israel's largest higher education institution and is home to 30,000 students studying in the academic areas of science, humanities and the arts.  As of Spring 2014, NYU is pleased to make available a new opportunity for students enroll in a course for NYU credit at TAU. This exciting  opportunity will allow students to engage with local students in the classroom.

Course Descriptions coming soon.

Button: Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester


Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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