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Courses - Spring 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Spring 2014 courses are now availble in Albert, NYU's Student Information System. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs during registration week.
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • If you're wait-listing, don't forget to Swap. More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • Certain Business, Science, and Psychology courses have prerequisites, visiting students email global.academics@nyu.edu for permission.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

Spring 2014 | Fall 2014 | Spring 2015 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2016

 

Required Course for All Students

Australian society is replete with contradictions. Aussies famously describe their nation as the lucky country, yet from the Indigenous perspective, it might more aptly be called the stolen country. Australia is the land of the fair go, which cruelly detains refugees; a multicultural nation with a history of a white Australia policy; a place with distinctive local traditions, which takes many of its cues from global culture; an easy-going country with a surprisingly large degree of governmental control over individual liberties; a highly urbanised population that romances the Bush and the Outback as embodying ‘real’ Australia; a nation proud of its traditions of egalitarianism and mateship, with numerous rules about who is allowed in ‘the club’; a society with a history of anti-British and anti-American sentiment that simultaneously hold strong political allegiances and military pacts with Britain and the USA; and a place with a history of progressive social policy and a democratic tradition, which has never undergone a revolution. This course strives to make sense of Australian society and culture by exploring the complexities and contradictions in Australia’s self-image.

The course will be introduced with an overview, and followed by four sessions covering four distinct themes during Orientation and the first three weeks of semester. Each session will include a 1-hour lecture, either given by the instructor or a guest lecturer, and a recitation-style discussion. There are seven mandatory field trips: Sydney Harbour Cruise, Rocks Walking Tour, The Blue Mountains, Featherdale Wildlife Park, Balmain Bowling Club Lawn Bowls, Overnight trip to Inglevale Farm, and the NYU World Tour.

Sample Syllabus

Anthropology

This course offers an introduction to some of the classical and current issues in the anthropology of Indigenous Australia. The role of anthropology in the representation and governance of Indigenous life is itself an important subject for anthropological inquiry, considering that Indigenous people of Australia have long been the objects of interest and imagination by outsiders for their cultural formulations of kinship, ritual, art, gender, and politics. These representations—in feature films about them (such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and Australia), New Age Literature (such as Mutant Message Down Under), or museum exhibitions (such as in the Museum of Sydney or the Australian Museum)—are now also in dialogue with Indigenous forms of cultural production, in genres as diverse as film, television, drama, dance, art and writing. The course will explore how Aboriginal people have struggled to reproduce themselves and their traditions on their own terms, asserting their right to forms of cultural autonomy and self-determination. Through the examination of ethnographic and historical texts, films, archives and Indigenous life-writing accounts, we will consider the ways in which Aboriginalities are being challenged and constructed in contemporary Australia.

The course will consist of lectures interspersed with discussions, student presentations, and films/other media; we may also have guest presenters.

Sample Syllabus

 

This course is a survey of the principal themes and issues in the development of Indigenous art in Australia. It focuses on some of the regional and historical variations of Aboriginal art in the context of the history of a settler nation, while considering the issues of its circulation and evaluation within contemporary discourses of value. Topics include the cosmological dimensions of the art, its political implications, its relationship to cultural identity, and its aesthetic frameworks. Students will visit some of the major national collections of Indigenous Australian art as well as exhibitions of contemporary works. There will also be guest presentations from Indigenous artists and Indigenous art curators.

Sample Syllabus

 


Asian/Pacific/American Studies (Social and Cultural Analysis)

This course is a survey of the principal themes and issues in the development of Indigenous art in Australia. It focuses on some of the regional and historical variations of Aboriginal art in the context of the history of a settler nation, while considering the issues of its circulation and evaluation within contemporary discourses of value. Topics include the cosmological dimensions of the art, its political implications, its relationship to cultural identity, and its aesthetic frameworks. Students will visit some of the major national collections of Indigenous Australian art as well as exhibitions of contemporary works. There will also be guest presentations from Indigenous artists and Indigenous art curators.

Sample Syllabus

 


Biology

Prerequisite: high school chemistry and BIOL-UA 11, Principles of Biology I or equivalent

Students registering for this course must register for Lecture & Recitation.

This course gives a broad overview of biology from an evolutionary perspective. Students will be introduced to the major biological forms and functions using a comparative approach. Particular emphasis will be given to how biological structures and systems are adapted to life history and ecology. Lectures will take place at the NYU Sydney Academic Centre. Lab classes will be conducted in a facility within walking distance of student housing. Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this course must register for the Lecture & Recitation.

Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.


Business

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (6 credits) OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (4 credit) plus ECON-UA 19/STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structure and financial asset valuation. This course seeks to equip students with a fundamental understanding of the concepts and principles of finance. The main topics of the course are time value of money, portfolio selection, equilibrium asset pricing (CAPM), equity valuation, arbitrage pricing, fixed income securities and derivatives. You are expected to understand valuation formulas and be able to apply them to new problems. The appropriate tools necessary for solving these problems will be developed at each stage and practiced in the homework assignments. The models we will cover have immediate applications and implications for real-world financial decisions. Every effort will be made to relate the course material to current financial news.

Throughout the course the emphasis will be on two main areas: learning conceptual knowledge through theory and problem solving; and critical thinking through the application of real-life scenarios and local cases. The course will incorporate aspects of Australian securities market and financial institutions and a comparative approach will be adopted in demonstrating similarities and differences between the U.S. capital market and the Australian capital market.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces students to the concepts and skills needed to create and critique effective marketing. Marketers in all organisations require an understanding of the many facets of marketing, beyond simply advertising or communications. The American Marketing Association defines marketing as:

“Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.”

The course focuses on the role of marketing and its importance in contemporary organisations and society. During the session, students will critically explore marketing principles, concepts and models from a practical perspective. Beyond studying the theory of marketing, students will analyse a variety of real-world examples and case studies. Organisations need to create a balanced, coordinated marketing mix, where all elements of its marketing activities work together. Marketing also requires combining qualitative and quantitative analysis to gain an understanding and reveal insights into the internal and external environment. To achieve this, the course uses a combination of lectures, class discussion, case studies, assignments and exams. The remainder of this syllabus describes the course and students responsibilities.

Sample Syllabus


Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 243, Organic Chemistry I or its equivalent

Students registering for this course must also register for the Laboratory section

The aim of the course is to introduce advanced concepts in organic chemistry with particular emphasis on aromatic and carbonyl systems. Some simple aspects of biochemistry including carbohydrates will be discussed. The importance of spectroscopic techniques in organic chemistry will be emphasised. Lectures will take place at the NYU Sydney Academic Centre. Weely 4 1/2 hr. laboratory sessions will be conducted in a facility within walking distance of student housing where students have the opportunity to conduct experiments using NMR and IR machines. A pre-lab session of 20 minutes will take place at the beginning of each practical class. Students will acquire the practical skills of Organic Chemistry and will become familiar with organic laboratory procedures and techniques.

Sample Syllabus


Creative Writing

In this class students are encouraged to consider the intersectional environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) that they interact with and within, and how their sensibilities differ living away from home to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing. We will engage with a diverse range of readings – featuring many Australian authors – and discuss technical elements and affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Weeks are devoted to crafting the short story and poetry. Students will complete weekly ‘microfiction’ homework exercises based upon images they take or find, and participate in in-class writing exercises, all of which will contribute to the writing journal submitted with the final work. The class emphasises the importance of embodied interaction with the city through a field trip using ‘The Disappearing’ – a downloadable app featuring over 100 site-specific poems spanning a ‘poetic map’ of Sydney, created by The Red Room Company. Students will think about the possibilities of marrying new technologies with writing as they navigate using poems as landmarks. Students workshop their drafts during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique. This takes the form of a discussion in-class and students are required to submit written critical feedback on their classmates’ drafts in an online forum. At the end of the course students will have the opportunity to showcase their work at a reading night to the rest of the NYU Sydney student body and invited faculty.

Sample Syllabus


English

This course is an introduction to the literatures of Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific region, with a focus on indigenous, migrant and diasporic writing. In addition to major texts from Australia and New Zealand, we will also encounter a range of works from Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, and the Pacific islands. Some questions we will tackle include: How have the cultural, historical, and economic processes of colonialism, diaspora and migration connected and shaped this diverse region? How have issues of race and indigeneity been central to various discourses of nationalism? What particular roles have Australia and New Zealand, as sub-imperial powers, played in the region? Finally, what can the latest generation of migrant writing in Australia show us about new forms of interconnections across the globalizing Asia-Pacific? Students in this course will examine novels, poetry, films and theoretical texts to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills. Along the way, they will gain a solid grounding in the problematics of postcolonialism, race, diaspora, indigeneity, nationalism and multiculturalism.

Sample Syllabus

 

 

 

Recent findings in the biological and physical sciences pose complex questions not just for those who work in the lab, but for philosophers, scholars, artists and students of literary theory. In this course we consider the cultural reverberations of ecological awareness—focusing on literature, cinema and visual art. Eco-criticism is a relatively young field of study in the humanities, developed in response to twin crises: actual environmental degradation, and a breakdown in intellectual categories of ‘the natural’ brought on by technology and politics. This course provides an opportunity to reflect on a number of key tropes in ecological thinking including wilderness, pollution, animals, food and apocalypse. Learn about a philosopher who survived a crocodile attack, the beach at the end of the world, how to prepare and eat Australian moths, and why the Large Hadron Collider is a metaphysical machine. Principle texts in this course include American and Australian novels, films and documentaries, read alongside supplementary sources in literary, audio and artistic mediums. We ask how literature—one of the richest arenas for the practice of human imagination—does, has, or could shape environmental thought and action. How does the non-human world enter into human artforms? What are the historical and structural obstacles to admitting different forms of consciousness into text? What literary genres and styles are called forth by the huge ecological challenges of our times?

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

In this hybrid reading / writing class, we will explore environmental journalism from an Australian perspective. We will meet for a weekly in-class seminar, except for three to four weeks during the session set aside for field trips. Our field trips will give us the opportunity to experience environmental issues first-hand, meet people, gather story ideas and find local Australian context for our own writing. Guest speakers will join us occasionally to further explore key issues. Our in-class seminars will briefly introduce key journalism concepts and techniques to those new to journalism and reinforce and further develop these skills for experienced journalism students. During each in-class seminar we will also discuss set readings, and explore the environment beat, reading stories that have been reported in Australia and around the world. We will consider work that explores this journalistic tradition, its forms and its themes and the place it takes in the new media world. Drawing our inspiration from great writers, we will find our own stories, our own voices and learn to tell our own tales. We will work on a class blog and each student will produce a news story which may be published on the blog, and a feature story for publication either on our blog or in an Australian or international print or digital outlet.

Sample Syllabus

Recent findings in the biological and physical sciences pose complex questions not just for those who work in the lab, but for philosophers, scholars, artists and students of literary theory. In this course we consider the cultural reverberations of ecological awareness—focusing on literature, cinema and visual art. Eco-criticism is a relatively young field of study in the humanities, developed in response to twin crises: actual environmental degradation, and a breakdown in intellectual categories of ‘the natural’ brought on by technology and politics. This course provides an opportunity to reflect on a number of key tropes in ecological thinking including wilderness, pollution, animals, food and apocalypse. Learn about a philosopher who survived a crocodile attack, the beach at the end of the world, how to prepare and eat Australian moths, and why the Large Hadron Collider is a metaphysical machine. Principle texts in this course include American and Australian novels, films and documentaries, read alongside supplementary sources in literary, audio and artistic mediums. We ask how literature—one of the richest arenas for the practice of human imagination—does, has, or could shape environmental thought and action. How does the non-human world enter into human artforms? What are the historical and structural obstacles to admitting different forms of consciousness into text? What literary genres and styles are called forth by the huge ecological challenges of our times?

Sample Syllabus


Expressive Cultures (College Core Curriculum)

How has Australian cinema engaged with significant and often contested historical, political and cultural events in the nation’s past? The films in this course offer critical perspectives on the history of colonisation in Australia; the legacies of the Stolen Generations; the controversies surrounding Australia’s role in World War One; as well as Australia’s relationships with its Pacific Asian neighbours. We will focus on films that have marked significant shifts in public consciousness about the past such as Gallipoli (1981), Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002) and Balibo (2009). We will also draw on films that have employed innovative narrative and aesthetic strategies for exploring the relationship between the past and the present such as Ten Canoes (2006) and The Tracker (2002). Throughout the course, students will develop their understanding of the basic methods and concepts of cinema studies. In particular, students will develop a critical vocabulary for analysing how filmmakers have approached the use of memory, testimony, re-enactment, researched detail, allegory and archives across a diverse range of examples.

Sample Syllabus


Gallatin

In this class students are encouraged to consider the intersectional environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) that they interact with and within, and how their sensibilities differ living away from home to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing. We will engage with a diverse range of readings – featuring many Australian authors – and discuss technical elements and affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Weeks are devoted to crafting the short story and poetry. Students will complete weekly ‘microfiction’ homework exercises based upon images they take or find, and participate in in-class writing exercises, all of which will contribute to the writing journal submitted with the final work. The class emphasises the importance of embodied interaction with the city through a field trip using ‘The Disappearing’ – a downloadable app featuring over 100 site-specific poems spanning a ‘poetic map’ of Sydney, created by The Red Room Company. Students will think about the possibilities of marrying new technologies with writing as they navigate using poems as landmarks. Students workshop their drafts during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique. This takes the form of a discussion in-class and students are required to submit written critical feedback on their classmates’ drafts in an online forum. At the end of the course students will have the opportunity to showcase their work at a reading night to the rest of the NYU Sydney student body and invited faculty.

Sample Syllabus


Journalism

In this hybrid reading / writing class, we will explore environmental journalism from an Australian perspective. We will meet for a weekly in-class seminar, except for three to four weeks during the session set aside for field trips. Our field trips will give us the opportunity to experience environmental issues first-hand, meet people, gather story ideas and find local Australian context for our own writing. Guest speakers will join us occasionally to further explore key issues. Our in-class seminars will briefly introduce key journalism concepts and techniques to those new to journalism and reinforce and further develop these skills for experienced journalism students. During each in-class seminar we will also discuss set readings, and explore the environment beat, reading stories that have been reported in Australia and around the world. We will consider work that explores this journalistic tradition, its forms and its themes and the place it takes in the new media world. Drawing our inspiration from great writers, we will find our own stories, our own voices and learn to tell our own tales. We will work on a class blog and each student will produce a news story which may be published on the blog, and a feature story for publication either on our blog or in an Australian or international print or digital outlet.

Sample Syllabus


Media, Culture, & Communication

This course examines diverse issues and perspectives related to global media. Historical and theoretical frameworks will be provided to enable students to approach the scope, disparity and complexity of current developments. These frameworks will be supplemented with the latest media news and developments. In short, we ask: what the heck is going on in the hyper-turbulent realm of blogs, Buzzfeed and The Sydney Morning Herald?

Students will be encouraged to assess shifts in national, regional and international media patterns of production, distribution and consumption. The aim is to come to an understanding of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Key concepts examined include: the advent of social media; the radical implications of globalisation; the disruption of established information flows and emergence of new information channels; the ethics, law and regulation of modern media; and trends in communication and information technologies. Issues addressed include: the rise of celebrity culture; the challenges facing the entertainment industry; and the rise, rise and potential demise of Rupert Murdoch. The focus will be international, with an emphasis on Australia.

Ultimately, the course will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a paradigm shift, as demonstrated by the Arab spring and the creeping dominance of Google, Facebook and Twitter. In other words: students, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.

Sample Syllabus


Psychology

Fundamental principles of psychology, with emphasis on basic research and applications in psychology's major theoretical areas of study: thought, memory, learning, perception, personality, social processes, development, and the physiological bases of psychology. Direct observation of methods of investigation by laboratory demonstrations and by student participation in current research projects.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course is a survey of cognitive psychology, the scientific study of the human mind and human thinking. During the course of the semester we will discuss many different aspects of cognition: perception, attention, memory, language, concepts, reasoning, problem solving, expertise, creativity, and decision making. The emphasis in the course will be on how psychologists have used experiments to help construct theories of how the human mind works and how human thinking occurs. The class will involve lectures, student presentations, discussion, video material to accompany lectures, and occasional example class experiments. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and conduct an empirical study, which they write up in a research report.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course advances the understanding of major principles and findings of social psychology. This course will specifically discuss four main areas: (1) the science of social psychology; (2) the individual within the social world; (3) the impact individuals have on another individual or group; and (4) social relationships.

The course will be in lecture format, but class discussion and participation is expected. Therefore, preparation prior to each class is necessary.

Sample Syllabus

 

Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Spring Semester


Priority: September 15

Regular: October 15

Applications received after October 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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