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Courses - Fall 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Fall 2014 courses with days and times will be available in Albert, NYU's Student Information System the week of March 31, 2014. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs during registration week.
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • If you're wait-listing, don't forget to Swap. More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • Certain Business, Science, and Psychology courses have prerequisites, visiting students email global.academics@nyu.edu for permission.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

  Spring 2014| Fall 2014 | Spring 2015
 

Required Course for All Students

Australian society is replete with contradictions. Aussies famously describe their nation as the lucky country, yet from the Indigenous perspective, it might more aptly be called the stolen country. Australia is the land of the fair go, which cruelly detains refugees; a multicultural nation with a history of a white Australia policy; a place with distinctive local traditions, which takes many of its cues from global culture; an easy-going country with a surprisingly large degree of governmental control over individual liberties; a highly urbanised population that romances the Bush and the Outback as embodying ‘real’ Australia; a nation proud of its traditions of egalitarianism and mateship, with numerous rules about who is allowed in ‘the club’; a society with a history of anti-British and anti-American sentiment that simultaneously hold strong political allegiances and military pacts with Britain and the USA; and a place with a history of progressive social policy and a democratic tradition, which has never undergone a revolution. This course strives to make sense of Australian society and culture by exploring the complexities and contradictions in Australia’s self-image.

Sample Syllabus


Anthropology

This course offers an introduction to some of the classical and current issues in the anthropology of
Indigenous Australia. The role of anthropology in the representation and governance of Indigenous
life is itself an important subject for anthropological inquiry, considering that Indigenous people of
Australia have long been the objects of interest and imagination by outsiders for their cultural
formulations of kinship, ritual, art, gender, and politics. These representations—in feature films
about them (such as Rabbit-Proof Fence and Australia), New Age Literature (such as Mutant
Message Down Under), or museum exhibitions (such as in the Museum of Sydney or the Australian
Museum—are now also in dialogue with Indigenous forms of cultural production, in genres as
diverse as film, television, drama, dance, and archiving. The course will explore how Aboriginal
people have struggled to reproduce themselves and their traditions on their own terms, asserting
their right to forms of cultural autonomy and self-determination. Through the examination of
ethnographic texts, historical accounts, films, live performances, and an autobiography, we will consider the ways in which Aboriginalities are being challenged and constructed in contemporary
Australia.

Sample Syllabus

 

This course is a survey of the principal themes and issues in the development of Indigenous art in Australia. It focuses on some of the regional and historical variations of Aboriginal art in the context of the history of a settler nation, while considering the issues of its circulation and evaluation within contemporary discourses of value. Topics include the cosmological dimensions of the art, its political implications, its relationship to cultural identity, and its aesthetic frameworks. Students will visit some of the major national collections of Indigenous Australian art as well as exhibitions of contemporary works. There will also be guest presentations from Indigenous artists and Indigenous art curators.

Sample Syllabus


Asian/Pacific/American Studies (Social and Cultural Analysis)

This course is a survey of the principal themes and issues in the development of Indigenous art in Australia. It focuses on some of the regional and historical variations of Aboriginal art in the context of the history of a settler nation, while considering the issues of its circulation and evaluation within contemporary discourses of value. Topics include the cosmological dimensions of the art, its political implications, its relationship to cultural identity, and its aesthetic frameworks. Students will visit some of the major national collections of Indigenous Australian art as well as exhibitions of contemporary works. There will also be guest presentations from Indigenous artists and Indigenous art curators.

Sample Syllabus


Business

Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (6 credits) OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (4 credit) plus ECON-UA 19/STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces you to the concepts and skills you need to create and critique effective marketing. Business people in all areas need a solid understanding of marketing to succeed. What is marketing? Simply put - Effective marketing satisfies consumer needs and creates consumer value while allowing the firm to achieve its objectives.

Marketing covers several kinds of activities, each of which affects the others. Firms must resist the temptation to focus on one of these at the expense of the others. This creates ineffective, unbalanced marketing. Furthermore, firms need to create a balanced, coordinated marketing mix, where all elements of its marketing activities work together. Marketing also requires combining qualitative and quantitative analysis. This course will give you experience in coordinating the marketing mix and combining quantitative and qualitative analysis. The course uses a combination of lectures, class discussion, case studies, assignments and exams.

Sample Syllabus


Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies

Prerequisite: PSYCH-UA 1/Intro to Psychology

While psychopathology courses are commonplace among undergraduate psychology curricula, courses focusing on child and adolescent psychopathology are relatively rare. More novel still is the opportunity to receive instruction in child and adolescent psycho pathology from practicing psychiatrists and psychologists at an internationally renowned clinical and research center. Through lecture presentations and discussions, this course will focus on disease etiology, epidemiology, phenomenology, nosology, and diagnosis. We will engage students in a critical review of common child and adolescent psychopathology and challenge social and cultural assumptions of what constitutes “normal” vs. “pathological” behavior, cognition, and emotion.

Sample Syllabus  


College Core Curriculum

How has Australian cinema engaged with significant and often contested historical, political and cultural events in the nation’s past? The films in this course offer critical perspectives on the history of colonisation in Australia; the legacies of the Stolen Generations; the controversies surrounding Australia’s role in World War One and the Vietnam War; as well as Australia’s relationships with its Pacific Asian neighbours. We will focus on films that have marked significant shifts in public consciousness about the past such as Gallipoli (1981), Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002) and Balibo (2009). We will also draw on films that have employed innovative narrative and aesthetic strategies for exploring the relationship between the past and the present such as Two Laws (1982) and The Tracker (2002). Throughout the course, students will develop their understanding of the basic methods and concepts of cinema studies. In particular, students will develop a critical vocabulary for analysing how filmmakers have approached the use of memory, testimony, re-enactment, researched detail, allegory and archives across a diverse range of examples. This includes restorations, revivals and re-imaginings of Australian cinema history such as the controversial restoration of Wake in Fright (1971) as an Australian classic; the reconstruction of Australia’s first feature film, The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906); and the revived interest in Ozploitation after the release of Not Quite Hollywood (2008).

Sample Syllabus


Creative Writing

In this class students are encouraged to consider the intersectional environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) that they interact with and within, and how their sensibilities differ living away from home to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing. We will engage with a diverse range of readings – featuring many Australian authors – and discuss technical elements and affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Weeks are devoted to crafting the short story, contemporary indigenous storytelling, creative nonfiction, and poetry. The class emphasizes the importance of embodied interaction with the city through a field trip using ‘The Disappearing’ – a downloadable app featuring over 100 site-specific poems spanning a ‘poetic map’ of Sydney, created by The Red Room Company. Students will think about the possibilities of marrying new technologies with writing as they navigate using poems as landmarks. Students shall workshop their drafts during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique.

Sample Syllabus


English

This course is an introduction to the literatures of Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific region, with a focus on indigenous, migrant and diasporic writing. In addition to major texts from Australia and New Zealand, we will also encounter a range of works from Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, and the Pacific islands. Some questions we will tackle include: How have the cultural, historical, and economic processes of colonialism, diaspora and migration connected and shaped this diverse region? How have issues of race and indigeneity been central to various discourses of nationalism? What particular roles have Australia and New Zealand, as sub-imperial powers, played in the region? Finally, what can the latest generation of migrant writing in Australia show us about new forms of interconnections across the globalizing Asia-Pacific? Students in this course will examine novels, poetry, films and theoretical texts to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills. Along the way, they will gain a solid grounding in the problematics of postcolonialism, race, diaspora, indigeneity, nationalism and multiculturalism.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

In this hybrid reading / writing class, we will explore environmental journalism from an Australian perspective. Each week we will read and discuss work that explores this journalistic tradition, its forms and its themes and the place it takes in the new media world. Drawing our inspiration from great writers, we will find our own stories, our own voices and learn to tell our own tales. We will grapple with the debates around environmental advocacy, ethics and objectivity and develop techniques to help us wade through the quicksand of scientific proof and funding agendas. Big local issues in the environmental conversation in Australia include water scarcity and the battle over inland rivers, damage caused by intensive agriculture such as spreading dryland salinity, land clearing, the felling of old-growth forests, combating exotic animals and plants, preserving the Wild, marine conservation and the Reef, protecting our primarily coastal homes from rising sea-levels, our economic reliance on uranium, coal and other mining, urban encroachment into agricultural land and the tension between indigenous rights and environmental aims. As a big coal and uranium miner, Australia also plays an important part in global debates around nuclear issues and ocean and air quality.

Sample Syllabus


Gallatin

In this class students are encouraged to consider the intersectional environments (natural, urban, cultural, historical etc.) that they interact with and within, and how their sensibilities differ living away from home to contemplate how a sense of place can be conveyed through writing. We will engage with a diverse range of readings – featuring many Australian authors – and discuss technical elements and affective poetics to learn how to ‘read as a writer’. Weeks are devoted to crafting the short story, contemporary indigenous storytelling, creative nonfiction, and poetry. The class emphasizes the importance of embodied interaction with the city through a field trip using ‘The Disappearing’ – a downloadable app featuring over 100 site-specific poems spanning a ‘poetic map’ of Sydney, created by The Red Room Company. Students will think about the possibilities of marrying new technologies with writing as they navigate using poems as landmarks. Students shall workshop their drafts during the course, learning how to effectively communicate critical feedback and how to be receptive to constructive critique.

Sample Syllabus

Course is currently under development.  Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by CAPA International (CAPA), an organization partnering with NYU. CAPA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Advertising
Business
Broadcasting
Education
Engineering
Film
Healthcare
Hospitality
Journalism
Politics and International Relations
Public Relations
Social Sciences

The internship course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.


Global Public Health

For Global Public Health Majors

The global health undergraduate internship has a three-fold goal: It: 1) broadens the student’s exposure to public health issues, 2) facilitates opportunities for student’s to observe public health work and leadership in action, and 3) increases the student’s knowledge of specific career opportunities. The internship is a semester long course where the student engages in fieldwork (a minimum of 90 hours) and attends in-class seminar sessions. The integration of didactic and practice experiences provide the student with opportunities to critically reflect on the fieldwork experience, complete a public health project that is mutually beneficial to the student and the organization, and synthesize public health knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

Course Objectives
• apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes gained from public health courses to global health practice setting(s)
• observe the culture, milieu, goals, work-ethic, and deliverables of a public health professional and/or public health practice
• enhance basic leadership skills in establishing, developing, and refining interpersonal and work relationships
• enhance critical thinking , analytic, and problem solving skills
• broaden awareness of public health career opportunities
• contribute to the internship site through the completion of an appropriate public health project or task
 

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Internship

Course is currently under development.  Enrollment by permission only. Application required.

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and 15 hours fieldwork per week. Internship placements are made by CAPA International (CAPA), an organization partnering with NYU. CAPA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

Advertising
Business
Broadcasting
Education
Engineering
Film
Healthcare
Hospitality
Journalism
Politics and International Relations
Public Relations
Social Sciences

The internship course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.


Journalism

In this hybrid reading / writing class, we will explore environmental journalism from an Australian perspective. Each week we will read and discuss work that explores this journalistic tradition, its forms and its themes and the place it takes in the new media world. Drawing our inspiration from great writers, we will find our own stories, our own voices and learn to tell our own tales. We will grapple with the debates around environmental advocacy, ethics and objectivity and develop techniques to help us wade through the quicksand of scientific proof and funding agendas. Big local issues in the environmental conversation in Australia include water scarcity and the battle over inland rivers, damage caused by intensive agriculture such as spreading dryland salinity, land clearing, the felling of old-growth forests, combating exotic animals and plants, preserving the Wild, marine conservation and the Reef, protecting our primarily coastal homes from rising sea-levels, our economic reliance on uranium, coal and other mining, urban encroachment into agricultural land and the tension between indigenous rights and environmental aims. As a big coal and uranium miner, Australia also plays an important part in global debates around nuclear issues and ocean and air quality.

Sample Syllabus


Media, Culture, & Communication

This course brings together diverse issues and perspectives in rapidly evolving areas of international/global communication. Historical and theoretical frameworks will be provided to help students to approach the scope, disparity and complexity of current developments in our media landscape.

Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Key concepts associated with international communication will be examined, including a focus on trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalisation, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with a particular emphasis on Australia.

Ultimately, we will examine the ways in which global communication is undergoing a fundamental paradigm shift, as demonstrated by the Arab spring, the Olympics coverage, and the creeping dominance of Google, Facebook and Twitter.

Sample Syllabus


Psychology

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

This course provides a detailed introduction to the major topics in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including perception, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision making. The course will discuss cutting-edge developments from research using behavioural, neuroimaging, and clinical methods. The class will involve lectures, student presentations, discussion, video material to accompany lectures, and occasional example class experiments. The course also has a practical component, for which students work in small groups and conduct an empirical study, which they write up in a research report.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

Introduces and examines selected core topics of research in Social Psychology. What is Social
Psychology? What are the methods used to study social psychological behaviour? What social factors
influence human behaviour? What situational and group factors influence human thinking and
behaviour? Can these factors explain individuals’ attitudes, prejudice and leadership styles? The format
of the course will be lectures, excerpts from illustrative movies, and class discussions, with selected
sessions on research methods and student presentations.

Sample Syllabus

 


Social & Cultural Analysis 

Please note that other SCA courses are found under their specific program headings.

This course will look at contemporary Australian society and culture from an historical perspective. It will examine the central issues in Australian life today and trace their antecedents. Australia is a western, liberal democracy that shares profound cultural similarities with America and Great Britain. This course will help to illuminate what makes the Australian experience of life different to other such western, liberal democracies. In measuring these differences it will look at issues such as: Australian settler culture’s relationship with Aboriginal Australians; Australia’s experience of migration and multiculturalism; Australians’ relationship with their environment; and Australians’ sense of national identity. It will look to see how these issues have played out in popular culture, and students will be expected to use primary sources to gauge the attitudes of Australians. This course will not only provide students with an understanding of the specificities of the Australian experience, it will also help them to understand American culture better, through a comparative approach.

Sample Syllabus


Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Spring Semester


Priority: September 15

Regular: October 15

Applications received after October 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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