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Courses - Spring 2015

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Spring 2015 courses with days and times will be available in Albert, NYU's Student Information System the week of October 13, 2014. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs after registration.
  • Enrollment in a Chinese language class is required while studying at NYU Shanghai. No previous Mandarin is necessary and students arrive with all levels of language proficiency. Select a Chinese course that you think matches your current skill level. During the first week, you will be allowed to switch levels if needed and NYU will help make adjustments to your Albert enrollment in Chinese after your level is finalized on-site.
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass / fail
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check the final versions of your syllabi which will be passed out on the first day of class! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • SCA-UA 9042/INDIV-UG 9450 is a permission only class. Students must apply ahead of time for this course. Application information can be found here. During registration week, register for another course as a place holder in case you are not accepted.
  • Some Stern (Business) courses are restricted to Stern students only until Friday of Registration Week. Non-Stern students will be able to register beginning Friday.
  • Some courses require special permission to enroll. Pay close attention to course notes and email for permission when necessary.
  • If you’re wait-listing, don’t forget to SWAP!!! More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu


Spring 2015 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2016 | Fall 2016 | Spring 2017

 

Required Course for All Students

This program is being offered to familiarize all students, irrespoective of college or concentration, with a range of issues that inform understandng of life in contemporary China. Students will engage in experiential learning activities, learn about issues pertinent to Chinese society and history, and interact with experts in various fields of Chinese studies.


Chinese Language

All students are required to take a Chinese language for graded credit.  (This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail).

This course introduces students to Chinese language, history and culture. It is aimed at students with no prior knowledge of Chinese. The language component of the course runs for 14 weeks and focuses on the development of competence in verbal communication and communication structures which can be used in daily life in China. The ‘daily culture’ component includes weekly excursions that are closely tied to the language topics being studied. The history and broader cultural components of the course will start from Week 8 and involve a weekly lecture and/or film to provide students with a basic overview of important historical events, as well as more recent economic, social and environmental developments. This course does not cover Elementary Chinese I. It is designed for students who have already completed their language requirement for their major or who will complete their language requirement with another language. Students cannot take this class if they have already completed Elementary Chinese I or equivalent or more advanced course. This course is not intended for native Chinese speakers. Finally, completion of this course does not qualify students to take Elementary Chinese II. 

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite: None

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily-life situations, but have not learned to read/write Chinese characters. This includes students who were raised in a non-Chinese speaking country but in a home where the Mandarin Chinese dialect was spoken, and/or students who have acquired a certain level of Mandarin Chinese language proficiency (primarily speaking and listening) by living or working in a Chinese speaking country/region for an extended time. Though speaking and listening will be an integral part of the course, the major focus will be on developing students’ competence in reading and writing. The objectives of the course are: 1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; 2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and write them correctly; 3) to build up essential vocabulary needed to read and write about topics covered in the textbook; 4) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; 5) to comprehend level appropriate passages and to be able to perform simple sentence analysis; 6) to write level appropriate essays (250-300 characters long) with grammatical, accuracy as well as cohesion and coherence; 7) to become acquainted with and be able to discuss in speech and writing aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite: Based on Placement Test.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-101.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-102

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have at least one year of Chinese language learning at NYU and who, before registering for this course, already command above-elementary aural-oral proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended written passages; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common social and cultural topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher the meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as syntactical cohesion; to continue to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-111.

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guess about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing. Prerequisite CHIN-202.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing. Prerequisite CHIN-301

Sample Syllabus


Art and Arts Professions

Over the past three decades, the contemporary art scene in China has expanded fast. The massive political, economic, and social changes the country has undergone since the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976 have dramatically altered its cultural landscape. The course will survey the main development areas in Chinese contemporary art. Dedicated to responding to the new textures of China’s metropolitan culture, it will look at the relationship between visual arts, new media, architecture and performance in the mega-city of Shanghai, often regarded as the cradle of Chinese modernity. The class will be complemented by guest lectures and visits to public museums, galleries and artists’ studios in and around Shanghai. Students will have the opportunity to meet leading figures from the art world in China as well as the international art community, including artists, museum directors, curators, art critics, and art dealers.

Sample Syllabus


Business

This course challenges undergraduate students to think deeply about legal systems and the continual evolution of business practice and business law. This process is multidimensional and involves social, political, ethical, and technological factors. In the course, students examine how key areas of business law influence the structure of societal and business relationships, while honing their analytical, communication, and writing skills. While focusing on the American legal tradition, the course taught in Shanghai Spring 2016 will involve select points of comparison with legal and business practice in China. Stephen Harder is the managing partner of the China practice of the international law firm Clifford Chance. He is based in Shanghai where his practice focuses on cross border project transactions of Chinese institutions. When based previously in Europe and New York, he acted as counsel for the Russian and Polish privatization programs and the Polish sovereign debt restructuring. He has written on "China's Sovereign Wealth Fund: The Need for Caution" in the International Financial Law Review, and spoken recently at Harvard and Columbia on "China Ventures Forth - Advising China on Foreign Investments" and "China in the Balance: Needed Reforms, Vested Interests and the Choices Facing China's New Leaders". He has also written on "Political Finance in the Liberal Republic" in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. He received his undergraduate degree in Chinese Studies from Princeton and his MBA and JD degrees from Columbia. Open to all Seniors, Juniors, with preference to Stern program students. Interested sophomores need to request permission from the instructor.

Sample Syllabus

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from the instructor.

Sample Syllabus

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels, from producer to consumer, and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas. Prerequisite: None.

Sample Syllabus

This course addresses contemporary management challenges stemming from changing organizational structures, complex environmental conditions, new technological developments, and increasingly diverse workforces. It highlights critical management issues involved in planning, organizing, controlling, and leading an organization. Ultimately, it aims to strengthen students’ managerial potential by providing general frameworks for analyzing, diagnosing, and responding to both fundamental and complex organizational situations. It also provides opportunities for students to enhance their communication and interpersonal skills, which are essential to effective management. The structure of the course encourages learning at multiple levels: through in-class lectures, exercises, and discussions; in small teams carrying out projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Prerequisite: None

Sample Syllabus


East Asian Studies

Students may apply 4 credits of non-language coursework taught at NYU Shanghai toward the East Asian Studies Major or Minor. Additional Major/Minor credit may be available for NYU Shanghai courses if approved in writing by the DUGS and as subject to Department regulations.

This course covers the history of China focusing on the past two centuries and especially the 20th century, when China underwent several major revolutions. We will follow chronologically the development of China starting with the foundation and consolidation of its last major dynasty, the Qing in 1644, moving through the collapse of the dynastic system and the rise of the first Republic of China in 1912, continuing through the Nationalist Revolution of 1927, and ending with discussions of the formation and development of the People’s Republic of China since 1949. Large themes that run through the course include the impact of Western colonialism on China, the role of internal rebellions and wars in giving rise to new political and social formations, the impact of Japanese aggression on China’s state and society, the Nationalist and Communist Revolutions, and the endurance of the centralized Chinese state. Two excursions to historic sites in Shanghai will reinforce students’ knowledge and understanding of the subject matter while also highlighting the important role of Shanghai in modern Chinese history.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

This course explores the environmental situation in China by examining both the very serious environmental challenges that China faces and the governance system(s) that exist in China for dealing with those challenges. In order to assess these challenges and systems, the course introduces a comparative dimension – looking at not only the Chinese system, but the American system as well, examining the environmental challenges and governance system of the United States, as well as the broader context within which China and the U.S. together constitute the two primary sources of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Is it possible to compare the American and Chinese systems? Can concepts of governance and assessment be translated between the two systems? What can China learn from the U.S.? What can America learn from China? Will the profound differences in our political and economic systems make environmental cooperation impossible, leading inevitably to conflict? Will globalization and technological innovation lead to healthy competition and cooperation to address common problems?

Sample Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

This is a 2nd-semester course aiming to complement and enhance the internship experience. Students will learn to critically examine their fieldwork in order to reflect upon what their particular, concrete experience reveals about life in contemporary Shanghai. 


History

This course covers the history of China focusing on the past two centuries and especially the 20th century, when China underwent several major revolutions. We will follow chronologically the development of China starting with the foundation and consolidation of its last major dynasty, the Qing in 1644, moving through the collapse of the dynastic system and the rise of the first Republic of China in 1912, continuing through the Nationalist Revolution of 1927, and ending with discussions of the formation and development of the People’s Republic of China since 1949. Large themes that run through the course include the impact of Western colonialism on China, the role of internal rebellions and wars in giving rise to new political and social formations, the impact of Japanese aggression on China’s state and society, the Nationalist and Communist Revolutions, and the endurance of the centralized Chinese state. Two excursions to historic sites in Shanghai will reinforce students’ knowledge and understanding of the subject matter while also highlighting the important role of Shanghai in modern Chinese history.

Sample Syllabus


Journalism

This course provides an introduction to the work of the reporter, with particular focus on covering China, and offers students a chance to learn and practice basic journalism skills, including news writing, descriptive & feature writing, and writing for TV etc. Feedback on assignments is given in individual meetings. Visiting speakers and field trips also offer insights into the role of the journalist and the challenges faced. Prerequisites: None.

Sample Syllabus


Law & Society

In its remarkable rise, China studies the world. But, in applying lessons from abroad, China often modifies them to reflect China’s own cultural values and traditions, as they have evolved over millennia. In Beijing and Shanghai as well as Washington and New York, officials, experts, and students use the same global vernacular of “governance” to discuss approaches to pressing public problems. Students in either country will hear terms (often in English) such as rule of law, democracy, transparency, environmental sustainability, and CSR (corporate social responsibility.) But the practical meanings of such terms are shaped by what might be called different “operating systems.” This course will seek to provide students with basic “vocabulary” (words, concepts and frameworks) of history, political, legal and economic systems needed to begin to “translate” between American and Chinese governance systems. To do so, the course will draw on the diverse backgrounds of NYU Shanghai students, and students’ daily experiences as students in at NYU Shanghai. We hope to learn about China (and the US), but also to reflect—in the light of 911, the 2008 global economic crisis, the explosion of social media and cyberissues, and climate change—on the ways in which NYU Shanghai students may learn how to navigate and help address the 21st century’s core challenges.

Sample Syllabus


Media, Culture, & Communication

This course looks at the transformation of China’s media landscape since the 1990s through market reforms and new technology. Topics include the rise of 'commercial' newspapers, magazines and TV stations; animation and new media; the role of advertising, and tensions between political control and demands for greater freedom of expression on the Internet and social media. Students follow latest developments in the Chinese media; field trips and talks by media professionals provide historical, regulatory and social context.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces the philosophy of cybernetic machines with reference to the technological trends affecting contemporary China. Topics will include: Chinese cyberspace and the Great Fire Wall; the revolutionary potential of microblogs; hacking; gaming; the ICT economy, maker innovations and machine intelligence.


Metropolitan Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Any writing on Shanghai today seems to run out of superlatives to describe the city’s dazzling transformation, spectacular architecture, and booming economy. But is it really the Global City it strives to be? In this course we will explore this question by looking into the urban development of the city from its status as a relatively unimportant trading town to the world metropolis of today. Besides regular seminar classes, the course involves field trips and guest lectures, and each student has to do their own semester-long research project.

Sample Syllabus


Religious Studies

This course is a survey of the major historical and contemporary currents of China's religious thought and practice, including Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism and “popular religion”. It will focus on the interactions between such teachings and practices, as well as on the contributions of all four to Chinese culture. You will study various topics including divination, visual culture, ritual, ancestor worship, morality, longevity techniques, healing practices and meditation. A selected number of primary and secondary sources will be discussed in lecture; documentary films and visits to sacred spaces will be also be key constituents of the course.

Sample Syllabus


Sociology

Any writing on Shanghai today seems to run out of superlatives to describe the city’s dazzling transformation, spectacular architecture, and booming economy. But is it really the Global City it strives to be? In this course we will explore this question by looking into the urban development of the city from its status as a relatively unimportant trading town to the world metropolis of today. Besides regular seminar classes, the course involves field trips and guest lectures, and each student has to do their own semester-long research project.

Sample Syllabus


Additional courses Offered by NYU Shanghai's Portal Campus

Additional courses from departments at NYU Shanghai's portal campus will have limited enrollment space for study away students. Some of these courses are open by permission only while others will open to Study Away Students on November 21. Registration restrictions and instructions for requesting permission where necessary can be found in the course notes for each course. You can view a list of these courses in the Albert Course Search under the NYU Shanghai school heading. NOTE: In order to view these courses you must NOT have NYU Shanghai selected under the Study Away Programs Filter. Please consult your advisor for any questions you may have regarding which courses may satisfy major, minor, or degree requirements.

Button: Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester


Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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