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Courses - Spring 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Spring 2014 courses are now availble in Albert, NYU's Student Information System. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.

NYU's new portal campus in Shanghai will officially enroll its first class of students in fall 2013.  A select group of courses from departments at the portal campus are open to study away students. A list of these courses can be seen here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs after registration.
  • Enrollment in a Chinese language class is required while studying at NYU Shanghai. No previous Mandarin is necessary and students arrive with all levels of language proficiency. Select a Chinese course that you think matches your current skill level. During the first week, you will be allowed to switch levels if needed and NYU will help make adjustments to your Albert enrollment in Chinese after your level is finalized on-site.
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass / fail
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check the final versions of your syllabi which will be passed out on the first day of class! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • SCA-UA 9042/INDIV-UG 9450 is a permission only class. Students must apply ahead of time for this course. Application information can be found here. During registration week, register for another course as a place holder in case you are not accepted.
  • Some Stern (Business) courses are restricted to Stern students only until Friday of Registration Week. Non-Stern students will be able to register beginning Friday.
  • Some courses require special permission to enroll. Pay close attention to course notes and email for permission when necessary.
  • If you’re wait-listing, don’t forget to SWAP!!! More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu


Spring 2014 | Fall 2014 | Spring 2015

 

Required Course for All Students

This course is being offered to familiarize all students, irrespoective of college or concentration, with a range of issues that inform understandng of life in contemporary China. To complete the course, students will engage in experiential learning activities, learn about issues pertinent to Chinese society and history, and interact with experts in various fields of Chinese studies.


Chinese Language

All students are required to take a Chinese language for graded credit.  (This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail).

Note: On Albert course is posted under NYU Shanghai: Chinese Language

This course introduces students to Chinese language, history and culture. It is aimed at students with no prior knowledge of Chinese. The language component of the course runs for 14 weeks and focuses on the development of competence in verbal communication and communication structures which can be used in daily life in China. The ‘daily culture’ component includes weekly excursions that are closely tied to the language topics being studied. The history and broader cultural components of the course will start from Week 8 and involve a weekly lecture and/or film to provide students with a basic overview of important historical events, as well as more recent economic, social and environmental developments. This course does not cover Elementary Chinese I. It is designed for students who have already completed their language requirement for their major or who will complete their language requirement with another language. Students cannot take this class if they have already completed Elementary Chinese I or equivalent or more advanced course. This course is not intended for native Chinese speakers. Finally, completion of this course does not qualify students to take Elementary Chinese II.

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correct basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level-appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have Chinese-speaking background and who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily life situations. It aims to develop students' correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing. Students who pass this class can enroll in "Intermediate Chinese I for Advanced Beginners".

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have Chinese-speaking background and who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily life situations. It aims to develop students' correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing. Students who pass this class can enroll in "Advanced Chinese 1".

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guesses about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Sample Syllabus


Art and Arts Professions

Students will work with traditional and digital photographic practices to engage with the people, art, and traditions of China. The class will include field trips to museums, galleries and studios, allowing students to interact with outstanding local photographers, media-based artists, and the city's creative community. Assigned readings will help students understand the historical and theoretical context of photographic work, and deepen the meaning of critiques and discussions. Experimentation will be encouraged, and students will respond to the experiences, ideas, and influences they encounter abroad through the work they create. Projects may range from classical photographs to digital prints and installation.

Sample Syllabus

The contemporary art scene in China has developed quickly over the past three decades. The massive political, economic, and social changes the country has undergone since the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976 have dramatically altered the country’s cultural landscape. In this seminar course, the course will survey the main development areas in Chinese contemporary art from the end of the 1920s to the present day. Dedicated to responding to the new textures of China’s metropolitan culture, it will look at the relationship between visual arts, new media, architecture, and performance in the mega-city of Shanghai, often regarded as the cradle of Chinese modernity. The class will be complemented by guest lectures and visits to public museums, galleries and artists’ studios in and around Shanghai. Students will have the opportunity to meet leading figures from the art world in China as well as the international art community, including artists, museum directors, curators, art critics, and art dealers.

Sample Syllabus


Business

Every professional business person must be aware of how legal systems work and effect business decisions. Furthermore, the interaction between Law and Business is multidimensional involving international, ethical, and technological considerations. In this course, students examine how key areas of business law, including contracts, torts, and business organizations, influence the structure of domestic and international business relationships. Students actively participate in legal studies designed to enhance business skills such as analytical thinking, written communication, oral presentation, conflict resolution, and team work problem-solving.

Sample Syllabus

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from the instructor.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the field of marketing by introducing and developing central concepts and philosophies of marketing, and exploring the relationship of marketing with other business disciplines. Keeping in mind the perspectives of both producer and consumer, the course examines the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. The course concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Ethical issues in marketing are also addressed. In addition to lecture, the course uses case studies and student projects as methods for student learning.

Sample Syllabus

This course investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. The course develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems, and introduces students to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis and class discussion.

Sample Syllabus


East Asian Studies

Students may apply 4 credits of non-language coursework taught at NYU Shanghai toward the East Asian Studies Major or Minor. Additional Major/Minor credit may be available for NYU Shanghai courses if approved in writing by the DUGS and as subject to Department regulations.

In this course we will select a number of critical issues in modern Chinese history to examine the political, social and cultural transformations of modern China. Topics of lectures include Confucianism and its modern fate, popular movements, the Great Leap Forward Movement, the role of Shanghai in modern China, Tiananmen Movement and the prospect of Chinese political reforms. The course will be approached through lectures, site visits, class discussions, and research.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines Chinese films in their social, cultural and political context. Spanning the history of Chinese film, this course traces the stylistic development of Chinese cinema, and the political and social movements that shaped film content and aesthetics as well as the structure of film production.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

This course explores the environmental situation in China by examining both the very serious environmental challenges that China faces and the governance system(s) that exist in China for dealing with those challenges. In order to assess these challenges and systems, the course introduces a comparative dimension – looking at not only the Chinese system, but the American system as well, examining the environmental challenges and governance system of the United States, as well as the broader context within which China and the U.S. together constitute the two primary sources of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Is it possible to compare the American and Chinese systems? Can concepts of governance and assessment be translated between the two systems? What can China learn from the U.S.? What can America learn from China? Will the profound differences in our political and economic systems make environmental cooperation impossible, leading inevitably to conflict? Will globalization and technological innovation lead to healthy competition and cooperation to address common problems?

Sample Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

This course aims to complement and enhance the internship experience. Students will learn to critically examine their fieldwork in order to reflect upon what their particular, concrete experience reveals about life in contemporary Shanghai.


History

In this course we will select a number of critical issues in modern Chinese history to examine the political, social and cultural transformations of modern China. Topics of lectures include Confucianism and its modern fate, popular movements, the Great Leap Forward Movement, the role of Shanghai in modern China, Tiananmen Movement and the prospect of Chinese political reforms. The course will be approached through lectures, site visits, class discussions, and research.

Sample Syllabus


Journalism

This course provides an introduction to the work of the reporter, with particular focus on covering China, and offers students a chance to learn and practice basic journalism skills, including news writing and descriptive/feature writing. Visiting speakers will also offer insights into the role of the journalist and the challenges faced, and provide additional feedback on students’ work and ideas.

Sample Syllabus


Law & Society

This course will study China’s governance in the context of America’s own governance system. We will consider how to compare American and Chinese governance systems, and whether and how concepts can be translated between them—so that the countries, and their citizens can learn from, and cooperate with, one another. In the process, we hope to learn about China, but also to reflect—in the light of 9/11 and Iraq-- more deeply on our own understanding of how American governance works—and how it is seen by the world.

Sample Syllabus


Media, Culture, & Communication

This course is designed to introduce contemporary media industries in China, involving print, broadcasting, film, PR, advertising, and new media. This course reviews the structures, functions, and influences of various forms of media industries. Practical media work is emphasized. Additionally, it analyzes existing issues on these media industries from historical, regulatory, social, and technological perspectives.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces the philosophy of cybernetic machines with reference to the technological trends affecting contemporary China. Topics will include: Chinese cyberspace and the Great Fire Wall; the revolutionary potential of microblogs; hacking; gaming; the ICT economy, maker innovations and machine intelligence.

Requires departmental approval prior to registration. Open only to NYU Media, Culture, & Communication students. Interested MCC students should contact Jonathan Martinez jm4599@nyu.edu


Metropolitan Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

The main aim of this course is to facilitate a rich engagement with Shanghai. The underlying premise is that the city is a critical site of globalization. Rather than view globalization as an external force acting on Shanghai, this course aims instead to show how globalization is inherent in the city and that an investigation of the distinctive features of Shanghai -- from the abandoned factories now revived as creative clusters, to the lilong architecture, luxury malls and street peddlers -- sheds light on both the past and future of globalization.

Sample Syllabus


Politics

This course focuses on China’s political and economic development over the last century and a half with particular attention to the last 33 years, the so-called Reform Period. Our three primary objectives are to (1) understand the historical trajectory of China’s development path; (2) consider in what ways and to what degree the growth experiences of East Asia’s high-performing economies helped inform China’s economic policymakers decisions and shed light on the prospects for the long-term success of reforms in China; (3) assess the state of China’s contemporary political economy and the current role of the government in generating or inhibiting economic activity.  

Sample Syllabus

This course has been cancelled for the fall 2014 semester

This course combines two parts: (1) introduction to theories of international politics and, (2) their applications to the understanding of US-China relations. The first part examines competing approaches to international politics, explains their basic concepts and rationales, and evaluates their explanatory insights. The principal objective of this part is for students to develop an appreciation of the ways in which various theoretical perspectives lead to different understandings of the structures and practices of world politics. The second part offers students an advanced understanding of US-China relations, focusing on the post-Cold War period, with a special emphasis on issues of security, human rights and economy. This part is intended to provide the means for students to develop their own theoretically informed analyses of major issues in US-China relations, such us how China’s membership in the WTO affects American economy, including the quality of employment opportunities in the United States.

Sample Syllabus


Religious Studies

This course is a survey of the major historical and contemporary currents of China's religious thought and practice, including Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism and “popular religion”. It will focus on the interactions between such teachings and practices, as well as on the contributions of all four to Chinese culture. You will study various topics including divination, visual culture, ritual, ancestor worship, morality, longevity techniques, healing practices and meditation. A selected number of primary and secondary sources will be discussed in lecture; documentary films and visits to sacred spaces will be also be key constituents of the course.

Sample Syllabus


Sociology

The main aim of this course is to facilitate a rich engagement with Shanghai. The underlying premise is that the city is a critical site of globalization. Rather than view globalization as an external force acting on Shanghai, this course aims instead to show how globalization is inherent in the city and that an investigation of the distinctive features of Shanghai -- from the abandoned factories now revived as creative clusters, to the lilong architecture, luxury malls and street peddlers -- sheds light on both the past and future of globalization.

Sample Syllabus


Courses Offered by NYU Shanghai's Portal Campus

The following courses from departments at NYU Shanghai's portal campus (new fall 2013), while not officially cross-listed with Washington Square departments are open to students studying away at NYU Shanghai. Please note that all courses listed below have limited enrollment space for study away students and are by permission only. For permission to enroll, please contact shanghai.advising@nyu.edu. Please include a note of endorsement from your academic advisor indicating your need for you to enroll in the indicated courses. To view days and times for these courses, scroll down to the NYU Shanghai section in the Albert course search or use the search tool. These courses will not appear under the Study Away drop down menu with the courses sponsored by the NYC departments above.

Please check with your departmental advisor regarding any courses you wish to satisfy major, minor, or degree requirements.

Art

This course will be an introduction to the use of photography as a medium of documentation and expression. Students will learn to use digital imaging to come to terms with their experience in Shanghai, a different cultural environment. The student will use photography to witness and create images to begin to understand their cross-cultural experience. Basic digital photography techniques will be taught, including use of a digital camera and Photoshop. Lectures, technical demonstrations, and group critiques, as well as field trips and presentations by guest photographers will be included. Assignments on individual photographers and artists will be required. This course is for beginning photography students with minor or no experience with photography. Students will provide their own cameras. This course is open to all students with or without an art background.

Note: in the Albert course search this course is located under NYU Shanghai in the regular course listings (not under the Study Away Programs drop down menu.)

This course in meant for studio artists who want to create a succinct body of artwork while studying in Shanghai. Students will create contemporary artworks using traditional Chinese art forms to traverse both cultural and temporal barriers of expression, creating a unique integrated style of work. Students of traditional Western methods of art making, including drawing, painting, sculpture, and printmaking, are going to be asked to work out of traditional Chinese art methods. These include calligraphy, ink painting, scroll rendering, landscape sculpture, and birds eye perspective in the present time. Students will examine the content of artwork, including ideas in contemporary and traditional art, both Chinese and international, and build various skills to translate ideas into reality. A journal will be kept to record ideas, sketches, references and future plans. The course includes a study of ancient Chinese paintings, drawings of still-lifes and live models, as well as visits to local artists, galleries, and museums. Class time will be devoted to individual projects and critiques, lectures, and group discussions. As a final project, students will integrate their living experiences in Shanghai with personal experience and/or the societal landscape, to create a substantial body of artwork for a group exhibition. This course is open to students who have an art background or upon the approval of the professors.

Business and Finance

This course introduces students to the use of statistical methods. Topics include: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inference concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; correlation; analysis of variance; linear regression, including multiple regression analysis. Applications to empirical situations are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: None.


Computer Science

How to design algorithms to solve problems and how to translate these algorithms into working computer programs. Experience is acquired through programming projects in a high-level programming language. Intended primarily as a first course for computer science and computer engineering majors but also suitable for students of other scientific disciplines. Programming assignments.


Core Science


Economics

Basic microeconomic principles: applications of supply and demand analysis; consumer choice; theory of the firm under perfect and imperfect competition; game theory and strategy; and theory and policy issues in market imperfections, such as monopoly and antitrust, externalities and regulation, imperfect information and regulation, income distribution, etc. Prerequisite: None.


Experiential Discovery in the Natural World

Over half of the human population lives within 100 km of a coast and coastlines contain more than two-thirds of the world’s largest cities. As a result, the world’s natural coastal environments have been substantially modified to suit human needs. This course uses the built and natural environments of coastal cities as laboratories to examine the environmental and ecological implications of urban
development in coastal areas. Using data from multiple coastal cities, student teams use fieldbased studies and Geographic Information System
(GIS) data to examine patterns and processes operating in coastal cities. This course uses the local terrestrial, marine, and built environments as a laboratory to address these issues, and team projects requiring field work form a core
component of the learning experience. As part of the NYU Global Network University initiative this course is being offered simultaneously in several
NYU sites globally and students are collaborating extensively with students from their sister campuses through the duration of this course.


Global China Studies

The literary scene in the 20th centuryChinese-speaking world is diverse in sound and script, vast in the scope of subject matters, and challenging for those migrant or exilic minds whose creative energy is driven by their critical insight to the world around them. Working in,outside, and between places like mainlandChina, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, America, and France, Chinese-language writers may have in mind an imagined community of fellow countrymen when they write. Oftentimes, however, they may also ask provocative questions about nationalism, linguistic loyalty, and authenticity as Anglophone, Francophone, or bilingual writers living in the West. From andacross multiple cultural margins, they speak to probe the nature of modernity, cultural contact, and otherness amid the global flows of labor and ideas. How do Lu Xun, Lao She, Ha Jin, Alai, and Gao Xingjian represent China on the world stage and find their place in this picture? Where in their works can we find stylistic and cultural hybridization? How do novels and stories by Zhang Ailing, Bai Xianyong, Maxine Hong Kingston, Gish Jen, and Shirley Lim cement or deconstruct the conventional ground on which we compare Eastern and Western civilizations? What kind of an alternative literary geography, and worldview, do these writers offer?

This course introduces students to the history and complexities of worldwide Chinese migrations and diasporic communities, including change over time and evolving global diasporic relationships and interactions. A signature Global Network University course, it may be coordinated with parallel courses held at other sites in the network, so that student research on the multiple inflections of the Chinese experience of diaspora globally is both collaborative and comparative.


Humanities

Throughout history, few people lived for very long in a polity that consisted entirely or even mainly of people with whom they shared a language and culture. Any examination of the variety of human cultures must take account of the political structures within which people tried to make their way, sometimes seeking higher degrees of autonomy, sometimes accommodating to rulers' authority, sometimes trying to extend their own power over others. Empires–polities which maintained and enhanced social and cultural distinction even as they incorporated different people–have been one of the most common and durable forms of political association. This course will focus on the comparative study of empires from ancient Rome and China to the present, and upon the variety of ways in which empires have inspired and constrained their subjects' ideas of rights, belonging, and power. The study of empire expands our ideas of citizenship and challenges the notion that the nation-state is natural and necessary. Students in this course will explore historians' approaches to studying empires. We will investigate how empires were held together–and where they were weak– from perspectives that focus on political, cultural, and economic connections over long distances and long time periods. Readings will include historical scholarship on the Roman,Chinese, Mongol, Ottoman, Habsburg, Russian, French, British, German, and American empires, as well as primary sources produced by people living in these and other imperial polities.


Interactive Technology and Media

Communications Lab: An introductory course designed to provide students with the digital toolkit. The forms and uses of new communications technologies, including digital imaging, sound, video, animation, and basic web development, are explored in a laboratory context of hands-on experimentation, readings, and discussion. Principles of interpersonal communications, media theory, and human factors are introduced. Weekly assignments, team and independent projects, and project reports are required.

Contemporary animation is no longer constrained to the single flat screen; it can now be seen on surfaces of any shape and size. This course takes students from traditional animation techniques to contemporary outputs. In the first part of the course students will learn the process of character design as well as script and storyboard development to create two animated shorts. The course then examines outputs afforded by new technologies, such as interactivity, multiple screens and projection mapping. Software includes DragonFrame (for stop motion capture), Adobe After Effects and Premiere (for digital compositing, animating, and sequencing), as well MadMapper (for projection mapping), and Processing (for interactivity). Drawing skills are not necessary for this course, however students will keep a personal sketchbook.

The Web now permeates most aspects of modern existence, and as a result, web development has become an indispensable skill complementary to many diverse disciplines. Students in this course will gain fluency in essential web languages and development approaches through a series of creative yet practical exercises aimed at touching on many important aspects of today’s multi-faceted World Wide Web – by building responsive websites, engaging games, and rich internet applications for the desktop, mobile devices, and Arduino microcontroller. Design principles will be explored through corresponding HTML and CSS structures, and will be based on a consideration for typography, images, audio and video. Dynamic data and interaction will be investigated through client-side scripting techniques using JavaScript, including the popular jQuery library. User generated content and the importance of content management will be reflected on through server-side scripting techniques utilizing the PHP based WordPress platform. Data storage and retrieval will be made possible through the application of MySQL databases and the HTML5 Local Storage specification. And universal data exchange formats, JSON and XML, will be part of an ongoing experimentation with third party APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) such as Flickr, Freebase, Google Maps, Twitter, Xively & YouTube.


Mathematics

This course introduces the main ideas of ordinary differential equations. Topics include vector fields, existence and uniqueness of solutions to first-order linear differential equations, stability, higher order differential equations, the Laplace transform and numerical methods, linear and nonlinear systems, and Sturm-Liouville theory. Equivalent to MATH – UA 262, MATH – AD 121. Prerequisite: MATH- SHU 160 and MATH- SHU 201.

This course is a continuation of Analysis I. Topics covered include the real number system, metric spaces, connectedness, compactness, completeness, Riemann integrability, uniform convergence, and power, Taylor, and Fourier series. Equivalent to MATH – UA 325. Prerequisite: MATH- SHU 201.

This course presents the foundations of calculus by examining functions and their derivatives and integrals with a view towards applications. Topics addressed include basic techniques of differentiation and integration for functions of one variable, including linear approximation and optimization, forming an essential treatment of calculus for any applied science.

This course explores functions of several variables and applications of calculus to differential equations, which arise in virtually all fields of applied mathematics; examples include equations of motion, chemical reactions, and current flow. Topics addressed include surface and line integrals; divergence, gradient, and curl; and the theorems of Gauss, Green, and Stokes, as well as first and second order differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH –110.

This is a post-calculus mathematics course that is designed to prepare students to enter a broad set of majors, from natural sciences through social sciences. Specific topics include elements of network theory, linear algebra, and differential equations. These topics are integrated to provide a unifying course that introduces analysis methods and mathematical models for understanding dynamical behavior of networks or populations of interacting units, such as genetic and neuronal circuits in biology or social networks of friends. Prerequisite: MATH-SHU 110.


Social Foundations

This course introduces to students contemporary Chinese political thought. It also explores in depth China's developmental path in the last three decades. During the course students will learn about official discourses such as Deng Xiaoping's theory on socialist reform as well as influential intellectual discourses including liberalism, the New Left, nationalism, etc. Questions such as "how do Chinese leadership and prominent thinkers understand China's prosperity and rapid development?" will be addressed and discussed. The course takes students step by step to see China from an “inner angle.” Via a thorough examination through such inner angle, students will acquire a better understanding of China's developments, as well as the problems it faces. Hence the course will be organized around such key words: market reform, democratization, socialism with Chinese characteristics, liberal globalization, the New Left, Nationalism, political Confucianism, good governance, the China model. This course will provide: (1) a survey of post-Maoist Chinese thought; (2) critical analyses of various aspects of the "China path" or the "China model," as well as “Chinese interpretations” of China’s prosperity,; (3) an investigation of those critical “key ideas” (e.g. “harmonious society,” "good governance" etc.) which constitute the dominant ideology in today’s China, and how these ideas shape Chinese understandings of present-day mainland society and China’s relations with the world. During the term students will examine their views on various aspects of today’s China. Along the way they will: (1)see how those political discourses and “key ideas” discussed in the course can help them understand China’s present reality; (2)read academic texts on China’s development, in order to analyze the authors’ arguments and evaluate their answers to the questions of the course; (3)learn about how the Chinese Communist Party thinks about itself, its organization and management, its ideology and theories of institutional reforms, its links to society and the economy, and its role in the world; and (4)express their understandings and observations on China through arguments – both verbal and written.

Less than a century ago, the Paris-of-the-East Shanghai and the Paris-of-the-West Detroit belonged to the most modern, booming metropolises in the world, until both cities declined. Today, the global city of Shanghai has revived its old glory days, while Detroit officially filed for bankruptcy in July this year. In this course, we take Shanghai and Detroit as case studies to examine the challenges and consequences of our fast-urbanizing world. We will explore the historical and economic factors influencing the transformation of these cities, as well as look at how its citizens are experiencing these sweeping changes.

Button: Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Spring Semester


Priority: September 15

Regular: October 15

Applications received after October 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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