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Courses - Fall 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Fall 2014 courses with days and times will be available in Albert, NYU's Student Information System the week of March 31, 2014. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.

A select group of courses from departments at the portal campus are also open to study away students. A list of these courses can be seen here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs after registration.
  • Enrollment in a Chinese language class is required while studying at NYU Shanghai. No previous Mandarin is necessary and students arrive with all levels of language proficiency. Select a Chinese course that you think matches your current skill level. During the first week, you will be allowed to switch levels if needed and NYU will help make adjustments to your Albert enrollment in Chinese after your level is finalized on-site.
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass / fail
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check the final versions of your syllabi which will be passed out on the first day of class! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • SCA-UA 9042/INDIV-UG 9450 is a permission only class. Students must apply ahead of time for this course. Application information can be found here. During registration week, register for another course as a place holder in case you are not accepted.
  • Some Stern (Business) courses are restricted to Stern students only until Friday of Registration Week. Non-Stern students will be able to register beginning Friday.
  • Some courses require special permission to enroll. Pay close attention to course notes and email for permission when necessary.
  • If you’re wait-listing, don’t forget to SWAP!!! More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu


Required Course for All Students

This program is being offered to familiarize all students, irrespoective of college or concentration, with a range of issues that inform understandng of life in contemporary China. Students will engage in experiential learning activities, learn about issues pertinent to Chinese society and history, and interact with experts in various fields of Chinese studies.


Chinese Language

All students are required to take a Chinese language for graded credit.  (This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail).

This course introduces students to Chinese language, history and culture. It is aimed at students with no prior knowledge of Chinese. The language component of the course runs for 14 weeks and focuses on the development of competence in verbal communication and communication structures which can be used in daily life in China. The ‘daily culture’ component includes weekly excursions that are closely tied to the language topics being studied. The history and broader cultural components of the course will start from Week 8 and involve a weekly lecture and/or film to provide students with a basic overview of important historical events, as well as more recent economic, social and environmental developments. This course does not cover Elementary Chinese I. It is designed for students who have already completed their language requirement for their major or who will complete their language requirement with another language. Students cannot take this class if they have already completed Elementary Chinese I or equivalent or more advanced course. This course is not intended for native Chinese speakers. Finally, completion of this course does not qualify students to take Elementary Chinese II. 

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite: None

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily-life situations, but have not learned to read/write Chinese characters. This includes students who were raised in a non-Chinese speaking country but in a home where the Mandarin Chinese dialect was spoken, and/or students who have acquired a certain level of Mandarin Chinese language proficiency (primarily speaking and listening) by living or working in a Chinese speaking country/region for an extended time. Though speaking and listening will be an integral part of the course, the major focus will be on developing students’ competence in reading and writing. The objectives of the course are: 1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; 2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and write them correctly; 3) to build up essential vocabulary needed to read and write about topics covered in the textbook; 4) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; 5) to comprehend level appropriate passages and to be able to perform simple sentence analysis; 6) to write level appropriate essays (250-300 characters long) with grammatical, accuracy as well as cohesion and coherence; 7) to become acquainted with and be able to discuss in speech and writing aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite: Based on Placement Test.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-101.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-102

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have at least one year of Chinese language learning at NYU and who, before registering for this course, already command above-elementary aural-oral proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. The objectives are: to be able to obtain information from extended written passages; to both express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common social and cultural topics; to expand vocabulary and learn to decipher the meaning of compound words; to develop reading comprehension of extended expository and simple argumentative passages; to solve non-complex textual problems with the aid of dictionaries; to write in relative length personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as syntactical cohesion; to continue to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials. Prerequisite CHIN-111.

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guess about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing. Prerequisite CHIN-202.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing. Prerequisite CHIN-301

Sample Syllabus


Art and Arts Professions

Over the past three decades, the contemporary art scene in China has expanded fast. The massive political, economic, and social changes the country has undergone since the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976 have dramatically altered its cultural landscape. The course will survey the main development areas in Chinese contemporary art. Dedicated to responding to the new textures of China’s metropolitan culture, it will look at the relationship between visual arts, new media, architecture and performance in the mega-city of Shanghai, often regarded as the cradle of Chinese modernity. The class will be complemented by guest lectures and visits to public museums, galleries and artists’ studios in and around Shanghai. Students will have the opportunity to meet leading figures from the art world in China as well as the international art community, including artists, museum directors, curators, art critics, and art dealers.

Sample Syllabus

This course in meant for studio artists who want to create a succinct body of artwork while studying in Shanghai. Students will create contemporary artworks using traditional Chinese art forms to traverse both cultural and temporal barriers of expression, creating a unique integrated style of work. Students of traditional Western methods of art making, including drawing, painting, sculpture, and printmaking, are going to be asked to work out of traditional Chinese art methods. These include calligraphy, ink painting, scroll rendering, landscape sculpture, and birds eye perspective in the present time. Students will examine the content of artwork, including ideas in contemporary and traditional art, both Chinese and international, and build various skills to translate ideas into reality. A journal will be kept to record ideas, sketches, references and future plans. The course includes a study of ancient Chinese paintings, drawings of still-lifes and live models, as well as visits to local artists, galleries, and museums. Class time will be devoted to individual projects and critiques, lectures, and group discussions. As a final project, students will integrate their living experiences in Shanghai with personal experience and/or the societal landscape, to create a substantial body of artwork for a group exhibition. This course is open to students who have an art background or upon the approval of the professors.


Business

This course challenges undergraduate students to think deeply about legal systems and the continual evolution of business practice and business law. This process is multidimensional and involves social, political, ethical, and technological factors. In the course, students examine how key areas of business law influence the structure of societal and business relationships, while honing their analytical, communication, and writing skills. While focusing on the American legal tradition, the course taught in Shanghai Spring 2016 will involve select points of comparison with legal and business practice in China. Stephen Harder is the managing partner of the China practice of the international law firm Clifford Chance. He is based in Shanghai where his practice focuses on cross border project transactions of Chinese institutions. When based previously in Europe and New York, he acted as counsel for the Russian and Polish privatization programs and the Polish sovereign debt restructuring. He has written on "China's Sovereign Wealth Fund: The Need for Caution" in the International Financial Law Review, and spoken recently at Harvard and Columbia on "China Ventures Forth - Advising China on Foreign Investments" and "China in the Balance: Needed Reforms, Vested Interests and the Choices Facing China's New Leaders". He has also written on "Political Finance in the Liberal Republic" in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. He received his undergraduate degree in Chinese Studies from Princeton and his MBA and JD degrees from Columbia. Open to all Seniors, Juniors, with preference to Stern program students. Interested sophomores need to request permission from the instructor.

Sample Syllabus

This course focuses on China’s political and economic development over the last century and a half with particular attention to the last 33 years, the so-called Reform Period. Our three primary objectives are to (1) understand the historical trajectory of China’s development path; (2) consider in what ways and to what degree the growth experiences of East Asia’s high-performing economies helped inform China’s economic policymakers decisions and shed light on the prospects for the long-term success of reforms in China; (3) assess the state of China’s contemporary political economy.

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from the instructor.

Sample Syllabus

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels, from producer to consumer, and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas. Prerequisite: None.

Sample Syllabus

This course addresses contemporary management challenges stemming from changing organizational structures, complex environmental conditions, new technological developments, and increasingly diverse workforces. It highlights critical management issues involved in planning, organizing, controlling, and leading an organization. Ultimately, it aims to strengthen students’ managerial potential by providing general frameworks for analyzing, diagnosing, and responding to both fundamental and complex organizational situations. It also provides opportunities for students to enhance their communication and interpersonal skills, which are essential to effective management. The structure of the course encourages learning at multiple levels: through in-class lectures, exercises, and discussions; in small teams carrying out projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Prerequisite: None

Sample Syllabus


East Asian Studies

Students may apply 4 credits of non-language coursework taught at NYU Shanghai toward the East Asian Studies Major or Minor. Additional Major/Minor credit may be available for NYU Shanghai courses if approved in writing by the DUGS and as subject to Department regulations.

This course covers the history of China focusing on the past two centuries and especially the 20th century, when China underwent several major revolutions. We will follow chronologically the development of China starting with the foundation and consolidation of its last major dynasty, the Qing in 1644, moving through the collapse of the dynastic system and the rise of the first Republic of China in 1912, continuing through the Nationalist Revolution of 1927, and ending with discussions of the formation and development of the People’s Republic of China since 1949. Large themes that run through the course include the impact of Western colonialism on China, the role of internal rebellions and wars in giving rise to new political and social formations, the impact of Japanese aggression on China’s state and society, the Nationalist and Communist Revolutions, and the endurance of the centralized Chinese state. Two excursions to historic sites in Shanghai will reinforce students’ knowledge and understanding of the subject matter while also highlighting the important role of Shanghai in modern Chinese history.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

This course explores the environmental situation in China by examining both the very serious environmental challenges that China faces and the governance system(s) that exist in China for dealing with those challenges. In order to assess these challenges and systems, the course introduces a comparative dimension – looking at not only the Chinese system, but the American system as well, examining the environmental challenges and governance system of the United States, as well as the broader context within which China and the U.S. together constitute the two primary sources of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Is it possible to compare the American and Chinese systems? Can concepts of governance and assessment be translated between the two systems? What can China learn from the U.S.? What can America learn from China? Will the profound differences in our political and economic systems make environmental cooperation impossible, leading inevitably to conflict? Will globalization and technological innovation lead to healthy competition and cooperation to address common problems?

Sample Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

This course aims to complement and enhance the internship experience. Students will learn to critically examine their fieldwork in order to reflect upon what their particular, concrete experience reveals about life in contemporary Shanghai.

History

This course covers the history of China focusing on the past two centuries and especially the 20th century, when China underwent several major revolutions. We will follow chronologically the development of China starting with the foundation and consolidation of its last major dynasty, the Qing in 1644, moving through the collapse of the dynastic system and the rise of the first Republic of China in 1912, continuing through the Nationalist Revolution of 1927, and ending with discussions of the formation and development of the People’s Republic of China since 1949. Large themes that run through the course include the impact of Western colonialism on China, the role of internal rebellions and wars in giving rise to new political and social formations, the impact of Japanese aggression on China’s state and society, the Nationalist and Communist Revolutions, and the endurance of the centralized Chinese state. Two excursions to historic sites in Shanghai will reinforce students’ knowledge and understanding of the subject matter while also highlighting the important role of Shanghai in modern Chinese history.

Sample Syllabus


Journalism

This course provides an introduction to the work of the reporter, with particular focus on covering China, and offers students a chance to learn and practice basic journalism skills, including news writing, descriptive & feature writing, and writing for TV etc. Feedback on assignments is given in individual meetings. Visiting speakers and field trips also offer insights into the role of the journalist and the challenges faced. Prerequisites: None.

Sample Syllabus

Law & Society

In its remarkable rise, China studies the world. But, in applying lessons from abroad, China often modifies them to reflect China’s own cultural values and traditions, as they have evolved over millennia. In Beijing and Shanghai as well as Washington and New York, officials, experts, and students use the same global vernacular of “governance” to discuss approaches to pressing public problems. Students in either country will hear terms (often in English) such as rule of law, democracy, transparency, environmental sustainability, and CSR (corporate social responsibility.) But the practical meanings of such terms are shaped by what might be called different “operating systems.” This course will seek to provide students with basic “vocabulary” (words, concepts and frameworks) of history, political, legal and economic systems needed to begin to “translate” between American and Chinese governance systems. To do so, the course will draw on the diverse backgrounds of NYU Shanghai students, and students’ daily experiences as students in at NYU Shanghai. We hope to learn about China (and the US), but also to reflect—in the light of 911, the 2008 global economic crisis, the explosion of social media and cyberissues, and climate change—on the ways in which NYU Shanghai students may learn how to navigate and help address the 21st century’s core challenges.

Sample Syllabus

Media, Culture, & Communication

This course looks at the transformation of China’s media landscape since the 1990s through market reforms and new technology. Topics include the rise of 'commercial' newspapers, magazines and TV stations; animation and new media; the role of advertising, and tensions between political control and demands for greater freedom of expression on the Internet and social media. Students follow latest developments in the Chinese media; field trips and talks by media professionals provide historical, regulatory and social context.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces the philosophy of cybernetic machines with reference to the technological trends affecting contemporary China. Topics will include: Chinese cyberspace and the Great Fire Wall; the revolutionary potential of microblogs; hacking; gaming; the ICT economy, maker innovations and machine intelligence.


Metropolitan Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Any writing on Shanghai today seems to run out of superlatives to describe the city’s dazzling transformation, spectacular architecture, and booming economy. But is it really the Global City it strives to be? In this course we will explore this question by looking into the urban development of the city from its status as a relatively unimportant trading town to the world metropolis of today. Besides regular seminar classes, the course involves field trips and guest lectures, and each student has to do their own semester-long research project.

Sample Syllabus


Politics

This course has been cancelled for the fall 2014 semester

This course combines two parts: (1) introduction to theories of international politics and, (2) their applications to the understanding of US-China relations. The first part examines competing approaches to international politics, explains their basic concepts and rationales, and evaluates their explanatory insights. The principal objective of this part is for students to develop an appreciation of the ways in which various theoretical perspectives lead to different understandings of the structures and practices of world politics. The second part offers students an advanced understanding of US-China relations, focusing on the post-Cold War period, with a special emphasis on issues of security, human rights and economy. This part is intended to provide the means for students to develop their own theoretically informed analyses of major issues in US-China relations, such us how China’s membership in the WTO affects American economy, including the quality of employment opportunities in the United States.

Sample Syllabus


Religious Studies

This course is a survey of the major historical and contemporary currents of China's religious thought and practice, including Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism and “popular religion”. It will focus on the interactions between such teachings and practices, as well as on the contributions of all four to Chinese culture. You will study various topics including divination, visual culture, ritual, ancestor worship, morality, longevity techniques, healing practices and meditation. A selected number of primary and secondary sources will be discussed in lecture; documentary films and visits to sacred spaces will be also be key constituents of the course.

Sample Syllabus


Sociology

Any writing on Shanghai today seems to run out of superlatives to describe the city’s dazzling transformation, spectacular architecture, and booming economy. But is it really the Global City it strives to be? In this course we will explore this question by looking into the urban development of the city from its status as a relatively unimportant trading town to the world metropolis of today. Besides regular seminar classes, the course involves field trips and guest lectures, and each student has to do their own semester-long research project.

Sample Syllabus


Additional courses Offered by NYU Shanghai's Portal Campus

The following courses from departments at NYU Shanghai's portal campus  have limited enrollment space for study away students and are by permission only. For permission to enroll, please contact shanghai.advising@nyu.edu. Please include a note of endorsement from your academic advisor indicating your need for you to enroll in the indicated courses. To view days and times for these courses, scroll down to the NYU Shanghai section in the Albert course search or use the search tool. These courses will not appear under the Study Away drop down menu with the courses sponsored by the NYC departments above.

Please check with your departmental advisor regarding any courses you wish to satisfy major, minor, or degree requirements.

Art

This course will be an introduction to the use of photography as a medium of documentation and expression. Students will learn to use digital imaging to come to terms with their experience in Shanghai, a different cultural environment. The student will use photography to witness and create images to begin to understand their cross-cultural experience. Basic digital photography techniques will be taught, including use of a digital camera and Photoshop. Lectures, technical demonstrations, and group critiques, as well as field trips and presentations by guest photographers will be included. Assignments on individual photographers and artists will be required. This course is for beginning photography students with minor or no experience with photography. Students will provide their own cameras. This course is open to all students with or without an art background.

This course will be an introduction to studio art for students who want to learn traditional Chinese art forms with contemporary expression, to traverse both cultural and temporal barriers of visual arts. These include calligraphy and ink painting as seen from a modern perspective.
Students will examine the content of artwork, including ideas in contemporary and traditional art, both Chinese and international, and build various skills to translate ideas into reality.
The course includes a study of ancient Chinese paintings, drawings of still-lifes, as well as visits to local artists, galleries, and museums. Class time will be devoted to individual projects and critiques, lectures, and group discussions.
This course is open to all students with or without an art background.

Business and Finance

This course is a rigorous, quantitative introduction to financial market structures and financial asset valuation. It has three goals: 1. To develop the concepts of arbitrage, the term structure of interest rates, diversification, the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), valuation of an individual firm, efficient and inefficient markets, performance evaluation of investment management , and valuation of derivative securities, particularly options. 2. To provide sufficient background knowledge about financial institutions and market conventions for students seeking an overview of capital markets as an introduction to advanced finance courses. 3. To introduce the principles of asset valuation from an applied perspective. The majority of the class is concerned with the valuation of financial securities. These valuation issues are heavily used in portfolio management and risk management applications. Throughout the course every effort will be made to relate the course material to current financial news. To take this course, students must be comfortable with statistics, linear algebra, calculus, and microeconomics. Prerequisites BUSF-101 and ECON-150.

Develops students’ abilities to understand business transactions and financial statements and to determine the most appropriate financial measures for these events. Investigates the underlying rationale for accounting practices and assesses their effectiveness in providing useful information for decision making. Emphasis is placed on accounting practices that purport to portray corporate financial position, operating results, cash flows, manager performance, and financial strength. Prerequisite: None.

The objective of this course is to provide future decision-makers with a systematic understanding of critical aspects of economic development and the global business environment. We will examine the basic workings of the national economies (macroeconomics) and then explain the role of international trade and international finance. We show how the forces of globalization affect international business, down to the impact on the future careers of NYU students. The challenges presented by tepid economic growth in Europe, a soft landing in China, and the changing dynamics in the US, and the long run prospects for global economic growth and development are discussed The course is divided into three parts: • Part I Understanding the modern macro economy. An understanding of the modern macro economy is essential in order to look at the relationships among countries. We start by defining the measures that characterize evolving economic well-being, from economic growth to inflation and income distribution. We examine how the economy grows in the long term and the role of productivity. We focus on the business cycle and how fiscal and monetary policies affect the economy in the short run and long run. Finally, we explore the role of banks and central breaks and the importance of financial stability and the consequences of financial crises. • Part II Trade and trade policy. As international trade plays a central role in fostering globalization, we start with an examination of the economics of international trade in goods and services. We examine the role of comparative advantage as a determinant of the location of production and the direction of trade. We also examine the reasons for and effects of government policies that create impediments to international trade. We show the impact of tariff and subsidies on real life situations, such as the agricultural barriers in Europe and the effect of the MTA on Chinese exports. • Part III Exchange rates, international finance, crises and development. The final module addresses the role of money and finance in an international context. We start with the Balance of Payments and macroeconomics of international financial flows. We then turn to the role of exchange rates in international finance and explore the factors that determine exchange rates such as inflation, growth and interest rates. Government exchange rate policies and the choice between fixed and flexible exchange rates are examined. We discuss the impact of the non-convertibility of the yuan, we ask when a monetary union such as the Euro area makes sense and discuss whether the Euro will survive. In short, Economics of Global Business provides NYU students with an overview of global economic issues. It serves as the basis for the International Studies Project and is a guide for many elective courses in international business and economics. Pre-requisite: ECON-SHU 150

Chemistry

This course uses an interactive, problems-based approach to study the structure and bonding of organic materials, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy, topics that partly trace their roots to the development of quantum theory. The topics covered include basic reaction mechanisms such as substitution and elimination, and the reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines, carbonyl compounds, and carboxylic acids. The course incorporates modern analytical methods that are the cornerstone of contemporary organic chemistry. Prerequisite SCIE-110

Computer Engineering

This module provides a rigorous introduction to topics in digital logic design. Introductory topics include: classification of digital systems, number systems and binary arithmetic, error detection and correction, and switching algebra. Combinational design analysis and synthesis topics include: logic function optimization, arithmetic units such as adders and subtractors, and control units such as decoders and multiplexers. In-depth discussions on memory elements such as various types of latches and flip-flops, finite state machine analysis and design, random access memories, FPGAs, and high-level hardware description language programming such as VHDL or Verilog. Timing hazards, both static and dynamic, programmable logic devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA will also be covered. Prerequisite: Intro to Programming or Intro to Computer Science

Computer Science

This course has three goals. First, the mastering of a modern object-oriented programming language, enough to allow students to tackle real-world problems of important significance. Second, gaining an appreciation of computational thinking, a process that provides the foundations for solving real-world problems. Finally, providing an overview of the very diverse and exciting field of computer science - a field which, arguably more than any other, impacts how we work, live, and play today. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming or placement exam. Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 101

Use and design of data structures, which organize information in computer memory. Stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees: how to implement them in a high-level language, how to analyze their effect on algorithm efficiency, and how to modify them. Programming assignments. Prerequisite: CSCI-101 Equivalency: This course counts for CSCI-UA 102 Data Structures (NY).

Core Science

This is a survey of the history of scientific disciplines and scientific methods from the “Scientific Revolution” of the seventeenth century to the present. We will discuss the ways of knowing such as reason, observation, experiment, and modeling. Our topics include science and religion, science and war, and the development of key scientific disciplines, institutions, and forms of communication. While focusing on physical and life sciences we will also ask about connections between a science of things and a science of human beings and human society. Students read original works by Newton, Lavoisier, Darwin, Freud, and Einstein, among others. 

This course will explore urgent issues concerning the relation of human civilization to the natural environment in which it is embedded. There are three main components: The first investigates the human relationship with animals, starting from what are the differences between us and animals, and what these differences mean today. Second, we explore broader issues of "nature": how we humans have conceived of ourselves as distinct from, or even superior to Nature; or, alternatively, enslaved to our inner nature. Third, we study global environmental issues, including how environmentalism emerged in the industrial era, what is its place in today's world, and what the prospects are for finding solutions to the most urgent global problems. 

In 1754 the antiquarian Horace Walpole coined the word serendipity based on the Persian fairy tale “The Three Princes of Serendip,” whose heroes “were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of.” In the ensuing centuries,the word has had a colored history. Many of the major scientific and technological developments that shape our modern economy and culture had serendipitous components, including X-rays, penicillin, nylon, vulcanization of rubber, Post-Its, Velcro, saccharin, Nutrasweet, Teflon, insulin, the Pap test, super glue and a host of others. In this course we examine the history of serendipity, the synergism between the scientific background and experience of the individual scientist and researcher, and some of the many serendipitous breakthroughs that have changed and extended our lives and continually improved our standard of living. 

Proclamations of the “personal computer revolution” and the advent of the “Information Age” are now history, if only three decades old. Recently developed digital media have also been associated with radical changes and even the “death” of traditional forms of communication. This class will evaluate the relationship between information technology and society, “the media and the message,” from a broad historical perspective. Students will learn about the major material transformations in information support, from scroll to web, with a focus on Western civilization. A comparative attention to the Middle East and East Asia for the Early Modern period and the Soviet political project for twentieth century developments will allow for a more nuanced interpretation of the notion of “modernity” associated with the “from printing press to Internet” narrative arc.
We will build toward an understanding of the interdependencies between technological and social systems in several steps. First, we will establish a longue duree perspective by surveying the scroll-to-codex transformation, and sketch contours of a Eurasian geographical plane by following paper's transition from China to the Middle East and Europe. Next, we will read foundational texts on the history of the printing press with a special focus on transformations in science and religion. We will then overview the famous nineteenth-century developments in information and communication technologies. We will ask about their roles in shaping individuals' gender and professional identities as well as in the governance of transatlantic empires. The emergence of big corporations in parallel with the modern bureaucratic apparatus and new recording and data processing technologies is our fourth step. Toward the end of the class, we look at how the WWII calculating machine, the computer, acquired the functions of a “media machine” and took center stage in the debates about alternative political systems. We conclude with an exploration of contemporary visions for blurring space and time, ubiquitous computing, and promises of ultimate technological transcendence: trans-humanism. To preserve a uniting element in this wide ranging material, each of these steps will systematically explore particularly important locations where technological and social changes are negotiated, such as the library, the printing workshop, the publishing house, the office, and, finally, the classroom and the body itself. 

Cultural Foundations

This course, the first segment in a two-semester survey of Chinese-language film history, traces the origins of Chinese cinema and its transformation and diversification into a multi-faceted, polycentric trans-regional phenomenon in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan up to the 1960s. We study a number of film cultures in Shanghai/China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, including the complex web of their historical kinship ties, and place them within the regional and global contexts of modernity, revolution, nation-building, and attendant socio-cultural transformations. To investigate these unique yet interrelated films cultures together raises the question of national cinema as a unitary object of study, while suggesting new avenues for analyzing the complex genealogy of a cluster of urban, regional, commercial or state-sponsored film industries within a larger comparative and transnational framework. Topics related to screenings and discussions include urban modernity, exhibition and spectatorship, transition to sound, stardom and propaganda, gender and ethnic identities, and genre formation and hybridization. 

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods in film studies by focusing on a select number of eminent auteurs in Asian cinemas. Our objectives are many: first, we situate within their particular socio-historical contexts the masterworks by master-directors like Akira Kurosawa, Yasujiro Ozu, Zhang Yimou, John Woo, Wong Kar-wai, Hou Hsiao-Hsien, Sanjay Leela Bhansali, Mani Ratnam, and Deepa Mehta. In doing so, we learn the divergent developments between and within Japanese, Chinese, and South Asian film industries. We then analyze how these directors make various stylistic choices to address issues of kinship, nation, gender, historical memory, modernity, and globalization. Against the background of 20th century cross-cultural encounters, we also study the contributions of these auteurs to world cinemas and the cross-fertilization in style between these film masters.

Beginning with the Chinese arts of Zhezhi (paper folding) and Jianzhi (paper cutting) the paper craft movement has roots on all continents. This course reviews the history of both Chinese and international traditions, in addition to examining contemporary practices. Additionally, students will have hands-on experience through weekly exercises in the fundamentals of paper engineering techniques and basic conductive materials, creating movable books and sculptures.

Economics

In order to enter the economics major, students must have completed Calculus and Mathematics of Systems and Dynamics. This course builds on those courses by introducing students to the way in which advanced mathematical techniques in calculus and statistics are applied to empirical problems in economics. Prerequisite: MATH-160

Experiential Discovery in the Natural World

This course will consider the origins and development of science in the West. What ancient principles are preserved? Beginning with early Greek “proto scientific” philosophy we will explore emerging paradigms of science through a consideration and replication of great experiments that had significant impact by changing accepted world views. Before turning to the scientific and ontological revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries we will investigate the assumptions of pre-modern science. Philosophical, religious and scientific arguments will be studied and evaluated. Representative works of Bacon, Descartes, Galileo and Newton will be read to introduce the outlook of early modern science. The course will conclude with a survey of some contemporary scientific theories that evoke the legacy of tradition.
One lecture and laboratory each week. In the lab students will, to the extent possible, replicate classic experiments from the history of science (list and descriptions of experiments in preparation). 

Foundations of Science

Course description coming soon.

Foundations of Science 1: Energy and Matter provides a comprehensive introduction to these two fundamental concepts that are so famously unified in the equality E=mc2. Following an introduction to the physical sciences, the course focuses on velocity, acceleration, forces, and energy, while simultaneously introducing students to atoms and molecules. Chemical reactions are examined, and the energy changes associated with them are investigated via a thorough analysis of the three laws of thermodynamics. Laboratory exercises focus on the guiding principles of the scientific method and an introduction to experimental design, data analysis, and scientific presentation, including technical writing Focused disciplinary tutorials in biology, chemistry, and physics provide an opportunity for in-depth analysis and discussion of classic papers, enhanced understanding of fundamental concepts, and development of practical skill sets. Weekly discussion sections are designed to hone proficiency at solving problems in a collaborative, team environment. 

Foundations of Science 1. “Energy and Matter;” provides a comprehensive introduction to these two fundamental concepts, which are so famously unified in the equality E=mc2. Following an introduction to the physical sciences, it focuses on velocity, acceleration, forces, and energy, while simultaneously introducing students to atoms and molecules. Chemical reactions are examined, and the energy changes associated with them are investigated via a thorough analysis of the three laws of thermodynamics. Laboratory exercises focus on the guiding principles of the scientific method and an introduction to experimental design, data analysis, and scientific presentation, including technical writing.


Foundations of Science 2, “Forces and Interactions,” introduces students to fundamental forces, including gravity and electromagnetic forces. Concurrently, atomic theory, the theory of molecular bonding, and atomic and molecular structures and shapes, in which forces and energy play a role, are investigated. Students apply these concepts to understanding molecules related to the life sciences. Laboratory exercises focus on acquisition of computer skills and modeling with a continued emphasis on technical presentation. Focused disciplinary tutorials in biology, chemistry, and physics provide an opportunity for in-depth analysis and discussion of classic papers, enhanced understanding of fundamental concepts, and development of practical skill sets. Weekly discussion sections are designed to hone proficiency at solving problems in a collaborative, team environment.
Co-requisite: MATH-110 

Foundations of Science 2, “Forces and Interactions,” introduces students to fundamental forces, including gravity and electromagnetic forces. Concurrently, atomic theory, the theory of molecular bonding, and atomic and molecular structures and shapes, in which forces and energy play a role, are investigated. Students apply these concepts to understanding molecules related to the life sciences. Laboratory exercises focus on acquisition of computer skills and modeling with a continued emphasis on technical presentation. Focused disciplinary tutorials in biology, chemistry, and physics provide an opportunity for in-depth analysis and discussion of classic papers, enhanced understanding of fundamental concepts, and development of practical skill sets. Weekly discussion sections are designed to hone proficiency at solving problems in a collaborative, team environment.
Co-requisite: MATH-121 

Foundations of Science 5, “Propagating Change,” focuses on disturbances in physical and living systems that bring about change. In physics, disturbances generate waves that are associated with the transmission of light and sound. These same waves generate responses in living organisms as sensory systems detect them, including nerves in some species. Electromagnetic waves, interactions among light, matter, and living systems, and the responses of nerve cells are examined. Changes during the maturation of organisms are explored at the molecular level as well. In addition, evolution is introduced as the fundamental means of propagating change that gives rise to new species in the living world. Laboratory exercises fuse physics, chemistry and biology as students engage in projects related to recombinant DNA technology, gene cloning, and protein synthesis and characterization.
Prerequisite: CCSC-110 


Foundations of Science 5, “Propagating Change,” focuses on disturbances in physical and living systems that bring about change. In physics, disturbances generate waves that are associated with the transmission of light and sound. These same waves generate responses in living organisms as sensory systems detect them, including nerves in some species. Electromagnetic waves, interactions among light, matter, and living systems, and the responses of nerve cells are examined. Changes during the maturation of organisms are explored at the molecular level as well. In addition, evolution is introduced as the fundamental means of propagating change that gives rise to new species in the living world. Laboratory exercises fuse physics, chemistry and biology as students engage in projects related to recombinant DNA technology, gene cloning, and protein synthesis and characterization.
Prerequisite: CCSC-110 

Description

 

 


Foundations of Science 6, “Oscillations,” examines how repetitious or cyclical events, although presumably predictable, are associated with inherent uncertainty in their outcomes. This is embodied in physics and chemistry in quantum theory and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. But living systems, especially when populations are studied, provide countless examples of oscillatory events that possess inherent uncertainty when scientists try to predict outcomes. Indeed, this final chapter in Foundations of Science challenges students to consider the very nature of studying complex problems and systems and assessing the uncertainty associated with the scientific method. The laboratory exercises involve collaborative projects in which teams of students must apply their acquired knowledge and skills to design experiments focused on answering a question or solving a problem, keeping uncertainty in mind as they report their results and discuss additional data that would be needed to provide a better answer or solution.
Prerequisite: CCSC-111

Foundations of Science 6, “Oscillations,” examines how repetitious or cyclical events, although presumably predictable, are associated with inherent uncertainty in their outcomes. This is embodied in physics and chemistry in quantum theory and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. But living systems, especially when populations are studied, provide countless examples of oscillatory events that possess inherent uncertainty when scientists try to predict outcomes. Indeed, this final chapter in Foundations of Science challenges students to consider the very nature of studying complex problems and systems and assessing the uncertainty associated with the scientific method. The laboratory exercises involve collaborative projects in which teams of students must apply their acquired knowledge and skills to design experiments focused on answering a question or solving a problem, keeping uncertainty in mind as they report their results and discuss additional data that would be needed to provide a better answer or solution.
Prerequisite: CCSC-112 

Global China Studies

This is a lecture course focusing on the changing relationship between East Asian countries and the United States in the 20th-century. On the basis of reviewing the early encounters between East Asia and America in the 18th and 19th centuries, this course covers the major political, economic, military, and cultural developments, as well as the dynamics underlying them, that have shaped the confrontation and cooperation between various East Asian countries and the United States in the past 100 years. In particular, this course aims to help students develop a better understanding of how nations with different values, cultural-historical backgrounds, political institutions, and levels of economic development may coexist in today’s world.

What do people think they are talking about when they refer to “China”? Does the term refer to a geographical, cultural, political, hybrid, or other type of entity? How and why has that changed both within China and outside China? This course is about reality and representation; it will address both the shifting geographical, political, cultural and human reality of “China” and what “China” meant to both inhabitants and outsiders in different periods and in different contexts. The goals of the course are 1) to deepen understanding of the history of China and the role of the past in the present 2) to introduce different ways of thinking about China in the world and the world in China, 3) to learn to distinguish between opinion, hypothesis and fact in historical inquiry; 4) to reinstate a concept of China as dynamic, varied, and interactive. Prerequisite: None.

This course introduces students to computational thinking with specific reference to Global China Studies, and provides a foundation for future research. Areas of focus may include the creation, enhancement, and analysis of digitized written texts, especially primary sources; methodologies for the use of the internet as a research and translation tool; the production and processing of photographs: audio recordings: video clips: and geospatial data. Prerequisite: None. 

Humanities

This course invites students to think about some of the most carefully controlled but also fervently sought-after questions since the time of Plato: what is the difference between gender and sex? What is the relationship between our gendered bodies, behaviors, and identities? How does sex, something we do, translate to the discourse of sexuality, something we talk about? What is the measurement of normality? If art indeed imitates and even changes life, in what ways do images of gender performance in literary and visual culture also reproduce and perhaps reshape our own experiences as gendered and sexed beings in a society? What can gender and sexuality tell us about the construction of culture, its boundaries, and its “outlaws”? Through the reading of philosophical, literary, historical, medical, and visual texts, and through discussions of case studies in mass media, we learn to see gender and sexuality as an evolving historical phenomenon rather than essentialist notions. We ask how the development of human interest in sexuality coincides with the burgeoning of governing techniques in modern times to police and promote sex simultaneously—as desirable and useful on the one hand, but also forbidden and harmful on the other. Lastly, as humanists, we ask how the boundary of our body (that is, our inside and outside in the most literal sense) is marked less by our blood cells, skin pores, or molecules than by our use of lan­­guage. 

This course provides an introduction to the history and culture of Shanghai through the eyes of fiction writers. We will read short stories (in English translation) by Chinese, British, American, Japanese, French, Polish, and South African writers who lived in the city between 1910 and 2010. Their stories will take us on an imaginary city tour through time and space: from businessmen, politicians, and prostitutes gathering in the nightclubs of the old Bund, to Jewish refugees struggling to find a home in the poor shikumen neighborhoods of Hongkou, to teachers and students fighting political battles at the university campuses during the Cultural Revolution, and young urban youth pursuing cosmopolitan lifestyles in the global city of today. The course also includes trips to various places featured in the stories and guest lectures by some of Shanghai’s most famous writers today.

This course explores global economic history from the second industrial revolution and colonial economies of the late nineteenth century to the multipolar globalization of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. It will trace the rise and relative decline of different national economies, especially the United States, and chart how technology, trade, investment, and politics created different economic connections. Topics will include different forms of production, changing cultures of consumption, shifting labor forces, economic crises, and the economic theories such as Keynesianism, neoliberalism, communism, and modernization, which have shaped economies across the long twentieth century.

Jeffrey Frieden’s Global Capitalism: Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century will be the basic text for the course. Additional articles and book chapters will supplement this book. Excepts from documentaries and feature films on such themes as microcredit, mass consumption and deindustrialization/reindustrialization will be shown.

Students will write two six page papers and have a final exam. In addition, they will be asked to track one country and its changing place and fortunes/misfortunes in the global economy and submit brief reports on that throughout the term. Students will choose a smaller country rather than one of the major global players about whom we will read more extensively. Those reports will be 1-2 pages each and will be submitted every third week of the semester, for a total of 4 reports and a total of 6-8 pages of writing. The final exam will be a mixture of short identifications and two essay questions. A list of 5 essay questions will be given out in advance and on the day of the exam, Professor Nolan will choose the questions on which students will write. 

Interactive Media and Technology

In this foundation course students will be asked to think beyond the conventional forms of human computer interaction (i.e. the keyboard and mouse) to develop interfaces that consider the entire human body, the body’s capacity for gesture, as well as the relationship between the body and it’s environment. Students will learn the fundamentals of electronics and programming as they build projects using the Arduino microcontroller platform. Arduino is a small computer based on open source hardware and software. When used in conjunction with various sensors and actuators, Arduino is capable of gathering information about and acting upon the physical world. In addition to these physical computing techniques, students will also learn to harness the methods of traditional computation. The fundamentals of programming: variables, conditionals, iteration, functions, arrays and objects, will be explored using the Processing programming language. Processing has a simplified syntax and approachable computer graphics programming model, making it an ideal platform for first-time programmers. Students will gain a deeper appreciation of the expressive possibilities of computation as they learn to author their own software, and not simply use that which has been provided to them. Additional topics will include algorithmic drawing and animation techniques, digital modeling and fabrication, data exchange, manipulation, and presentation, as well as control of images, audio and video, including computer vision techniques. Structured weekly exercises are aimed at building specific skills, however students are free to pursue their own diverse interests in their midterm and final projects. Required Course. Prerequisite: None.

Beginning with a design problem or challenge, and following a period of analysis and research, a designer can begin to draft, prototype, test, and evaluate possible solutions, often repeating these operations several times until the design reaches maturity. Agile software development methodologies, which involve the formation of self-organized cooperative teams, frequent deadlines with deliverables, and a willingness to accept changing conditions and requirements, have radically changed the way software is being produced. Additionally, new applications, such as Fritzing, 123D Circuits, and Eagle have greatly facilitated the process of electronic circuit design. And Computer Aided Design (CAD) applications, for example Rhinocerous and Tinkercad, and newly available digital fabrication equipment have dramatically quickened the pace with which designers can create physical prototypes. Students in this course will be confronted with a series of design challenges for which they have to propose and prototype possible solutions. The first design challenge will entail the entire class working together to produce a software prototype by adopting agile strategies. The second design challenge will involve students in the process of refining a circuit, and will require bringing a prototype from schematic, to breadboard, perfboard, and finally resulting in a printed circuit board. For the third design challenge, students will explore the use of 3D printers, laser cutters, computer numerical control (CNC) machines, and other tools to produce a physical prototype. Students will then be free to work on a personal design challenge for their final project. 

In this course students will explore various techniques, both practical and experimental, for sound and video synthesis as it relates to the production of multimedia applications as well as live audio visual performance. Comprehensive practical experience and substantial applied knowledge will be acquired through lectures, coursework, and critique. Students will begin by learning to work with the Max graphical programming environment, which is based on a patch bay metaphor, to produce their own programs (Max patches). Working with Max involves the visual arrangement and interconnection of blocks representing various inputs, outputs, and functions. Through the application of Max’s MSP and Jitter extensions, students will take advantage of the real-time audio and video processing capabilities of the application. Additionally, sound sequencing software, Ableton Live, will be integrated with Max. The application of sound control protocols, such as MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) and OSC (Open Sound Control), will be introduced and investigated. Students will be encouraged to consider new possibilities for input and output afforded by the use of various sensors and actuators with Arduino. Existing off-the-shelf motion controllers, for example the Wii Remote, Microsoft Kinect, and Leap Motion will also be adopted to capture and interpret movement and gesture for the purposes of controlling audio and video. For their final projects, students will create a unique musical instrument. The class culminates in a live performance where students will perform their instruments in front of an enthusiastic audience. 

In this foundation course, designed to provide students with a framework to effectively communicate through digital means, students will explore the possibilities of digital media by successively producing projects that make use of digital images, audio, video, and the Web. Students learn in a laboratory context of hands-on experimentation, and principles of interpersonal communications, media theory, and human factors will be introduced in readings and investigated through discussion. Adobe Creative Cloud and other relevant software applications will be examined, and the basics of fundamental web languages HTML, CSS and JavaScript will be studied, to establish a diverse digital toolkit. Both traditional and experimental outputs, including online and interactive media platforms, will be explored. Weekly assignments, group and independent projects, as well as project reports will be assigned in each of the core areas of study.. Required Course. Prerequisite: None

Mathematics

This course is designed as both a preparation for the calculus sequence and an introduction to basic mathematical tools used in applied mathematics. Much of this course revolves around the notion of function, but the emphasis is on algebraic properties. Functions under study in this course include polynomials, rational functions, trigonometric functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions. Other topics covered include vector geometry in two and three dimensions, matrix algebra, conic sections, sequences and series, binomial expressions, and data modeling. Equivalent to MATH – UA 9, MATH – AD 101. Prerequisite: Placement via NYU SH mathematics placement exam.

This course is a continuation of Honors Calculus. Topics covered include integration techniques, trigonometric functions, the logarithm, exponential functions, approximation by polynomials, sequences, series, convergence, uniform convergence, power series, Taylor series, complex numbers and functions, Euclidean spaces, and basic topology. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH-SHU 201. Equivalency: This course counts for MATH-UA 328.

Prerequisite: Analysis II or equivalent.

This course is a continuation of Analysis II, with emphasis on functions of several variables. Topics covered include the topology of Euclidean space, the Stone-Weierstrass theorem, the implicit and inverse function theorems in several variables, Jordan regions, linear transformations, differentiation of integrals, and integration of differential forms.

This course presents the foundations of calculus for functions of a single variable. Topics addressed include limits, continuity, rules of differentiation, approximation,antiderivatives, indefinite and definite integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, integration techniques, and improper integrals. Prerequisite: Placement via NYU SH Mathematics Placement Examination or a grade of C or better in MATH-SHU 009.

This one-semester course serves as an introduction to great ideas in mathematics. During the course we will examine a variety of topics chosen from the following broad categories. 1) A survey of pure mathematics: What do mathematicians do and what questions inspire them? 2) Great works: What are some of the historically big ideas in the field? Who were the mathematicians that came up with them? 3) Mathematics as a reflection of the world we live in: How does our understanding of the natural world affect mathematics (and vice versa). 4) Computations, proof, and mathematical reasoning: Quantitative skills are crucial for dealing with the sheer amount of information available in modern society. 5) Mathematics as a liberal art: Historically, some of the greatest mathematicians have also been poets, artists, and philosophers. How is mathematics a natural result of humanity's interest in the nature of truth, beauty, and understanding? Why is math a liberal art? Prerequisite: None. For students in Humanities

Linear systems appear throughout the applied sciences; examples include chemical equations, electrical networks, and heat distribution. This course covers linear algebra and its applications. Topics discussed include systems of linear equations, matrices and their determinants, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, quadratic forms, and matrix decompositions, all with a view towards applications. Prerequisite: MATH-SHU 110. 

This course comprises a combination of the theory of probability and the mathematical foundations with techniques of modern statistical analysis. It is designed to acquaint the student with both probability and statistics in the context of their applications to the sciences. In probability: mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; law of large numbers and the normal distribution; application to coin-tossing, radioactive decay, and so on. In statistics: sampling; normal and other useful distributions; testing of hypotheses; confidence intervals; correlation and regression; and applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH-SHU 121. Not open to students who have taken MATH-SHU 233. Equivalency: This course counts for MATH-UA 235.

Complex variables and functions play an essential role in many branches of mathematics and science. In this course, we cover basic aspects of the theory, including differentiation of complex functions, the Cauchy-Riemann equations, Cauchy’s theorem and integral formula, singularities, Laurent series, conformal mapping, analytic continuous, and applications to fluid flow. Prerequisite: MATH- SHU 201 and MATH- SHU 208. 

Neural Science

Introductory lecture course covering the fundamental principles of neuroscience. Topics include principles of brain organization, structure and ultrastrucIntroductory lecture course covering the fundamental principles of neuroscience. Topics include principles of brain organization, structure and ultrastructure of neurons, neurophysiology and biophysics of excitable cells, synaptic transmission, neurotransmitter systems and neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, neuroendocrine relations, molecular biology of neurons, development and plasticity of the brain, aging and diseases of the nervous system, organization of sensory and motor systems, structure and function of the cerebral cortex, and modeling of neural systems. Prerequisite: CCSC-110.

Social Foundations

In this course we explore the special place of "cultural heritage" in global life today. We will trace the journeys of cultural heritage items around the world — from the war trophies and curiosity cabinets of history, to our modern era’s museums, and the global movements in antiquities, art, and other objects from the global South to collectors and museums in the global North, through looting, smuggling, and trade. Topics we’ll investigate include "biographical objects" and the anthropology and psychology of collecting; the social life of objects of desire; the construction of value and knowledge in the representation and display of such objects; the beginnings of museums and their global spread; the concepts of national and global cultural heritage; as well as a series of ongoing international legal and moral battles over heritage, including cases related to China. 

This course will give a brief survey of Chinese philosophy from the pre-Qin period to the present in the perspective of world philosophy. To capture the quintessence of traditional Chinese wisdom, we will focus on three most influential schools of thought in ancient China, namely, Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism. We will delineate the evolution of Confucianism from Confucius to Neo-Confucianism in Song and Ming dynasties, distinguish Taoism as philosophy from Taoism as religion, and examine the process of sinicization of Buddhism, taking Zen Buddhism as a paradigm case. In modern times, against the background of the exchange between the Chinese and the Western cultures, traditional Chinese wisdom, through the creative work of modern Chinese thinkers, obtained a new lease of life. Under the heading of the modernization of traditional Chinese wisdom, we will examine three most prominent schools in the 20thcentury Chinese philosophy, namely, contemporary Neo-Confucianism, Tsinghua school of realism (the Chinese analytic philosophy), and Chinese Marxism. Students are required to read the assigned texts before each class and actively participate in class discussions. Prerequisite: None.

Social Science

What are the causes of war? Why are some countries able to cooperate over issues like trade or the environment, while others are not? What is the role of international organizations and alliances, such as the UN, NATO, and the EU in the international state system? This course will give students an introduction to thinking analytically and systematically about outcomes in the international system, will teach them the prevailing major theories about these issues, and will equip students to begin to formulate their own answers to these questions. Students will learn a set of formal tools to analyze complex world events, which will prepare them for upper level international relations and other social science courses, as well as to become comfortable applying social science methodologies and theories to better understanding the world around us. The class will use some basic math, including introductory game theory, and some background in inferring statistical results will be helpful, but is not required. Over the course of the semester students will be challenged to apply the models and theories from class to real world situations.

Making words and images public used to be difficult, complex, and expensive. Now it's not. That change, simple but fundamental, is transforming the media landscape. A publisher used to be required if you wanted to put material out into the public sphere; now anyone with a keyboard or a camera can circulate their material globally. New, cheap forms of communication have opened the floodgates to a massive increase in the number and variety of participants creating and circulating media. This change, enormous and permanent, is driving several effects in the media landscape today.

This course covers the transition from a world populated by professional media makers and a silent public to one where anyone who has a phone or a computer can be both producer and consumer. This change, brought about by the technological and economic characteristics of digital data and networks, is upending old industries -- newspapers, music publishing, moviemaking -- faster than new systems can be put in place. The result is chaos and experimentation as new ways of participating in the previously sparse media landscape are appearing everywhere.

This course will provide a brief history and economics of the previous media landscape, the design of digital networks that upend those historical systems, and new modes of participation for sharing words, images, audio and video. We will look at the dynamics of both English-language services, such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, and, in translation, Chinese-language services such as Sina Weibo, Weixin and QQ.

The class will consist of class discussion around readings and lectures, in-class presentations and analysis of new uses of media that you observe (or participate in) outside class. There will be two written analyses of the media landscape, one at mid-term and one final paper.

Button: Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester


Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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