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Courses - Fall 2013

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Fall 2013 courses are now availble in Albert, NYU's Student Information System. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.

NYU's new portal campus in Shanghai will officially enroll its first class of students in fall 2013.  A select group of courses from departments at the portal campus are open to study away students. A list of these courses can be seen here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs after registration.
  • Enrollment in a Chinese language class is required while studying at NYU Shanghai. No previous Mandarin is necessary and students arrive with all levels of language proficiency. Select a Chinese course that you think matches your current skill level. During the first week, you will be allowed to switch levels if needed and NYU will help make adjustments to your Albert enrollment in Chinese after your level is finalized on-site.
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass / fail
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check the final versions of your syllabi which will be passed out on the first day of class! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • SCA-UA 9042/INDIV-UG 9450 is a permission only class. Students must apply ahead of time for this course. Application information can be found here. During registration week, register for another course as a place holder in case you are not accepted.
  • Some Stern (Business) courses are restricted to Stern students only until Friday of Registration Week. Non-Stern students will be able to register beginning Friday.
  • Some courses require special permission to enroll. Pay close attention to course notes and email for permission when necessary.
  • If you’re wait-listing, don’t forget to SWAP!!! More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

Spring 2013 | Fall 2013 | Spring 2014

 

Required Course for All Students

This course is being offered to familiarize all students, irrespoective of college or concentration, with a range of issues that inform understandng of life in contemporary China. To complete the course, students will engage in experiential learning activities, learn about issues pertinent to Chinese society and history, and interact with experts in various fields of Chinese studies.


Chinese Language

All students are required to take a Chinese language for graded credit.  (This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail).

Note: On Albert course is posted under NYU Shanghai: Chinese Language

This course introduces students to Chinese language, history and culture. It is aimed at students with no prior knowledge of Chinese. The language component of the course runs for 14 weeks and focuses on the development of competence in verbal communication and communication structures which can be used in daily life in China. The ‘daily culture’ component includes weekly excursions that are closely tied to the language topics being studied. The history and broader cultural components of the course will start from Week 8 and involve a weekly lecture and/or film to provide students with a basic overview of important historical events, as well as more recent economic, social and environmental developments. This course does not cover Elementary Chinese I. It is designed for students who have already completed their language requirement for their major or who will complete their language requirement with another language. Students cannot take this class if they have already completed Elementary Chinese I or equivalent or more advanced course. This course is not intended for native Chinese speakers. Finally, completion of this course does not qualify students to take Elementary Chinese II.

This course is the first part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have no or almost no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to master the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones) with satisfactory pronunciation; (2) to understand the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional) and learn to write them correctly; (3) to understand and use correct basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to build up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level-appropriate passages (100-150 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have Chinese-speaking background and who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily life situations. It aims to develop students' correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing. Students who pass this class can enroll in "Intermediate Chinese I for Advanced Beginners".

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year elementary-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to reinforce and further develop language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as it relates to everyday life situations. The objectives of the course are: (1) to continue mastering the Chinese phonetic system (pinyin and tones); (2) to become further familiarized with the construction of commonly used Chinese Characters (both simplified and traditional); (3) to understand and use correctly basic Chinese grammar and sentence structures; (4) to continue building up essential vocabulary; (5) to read and write level appropriate passages (150-200 characters long); and (6) to become acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Elementary Chinese II or equivalent. It is designed to consolidate and develop overall aural-oral proficiency. Objectives are: (1) to be able to obtain information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in relative length, feelings and opinions on common topics; (3) to develop vocabulary needed to discuss common topics and begin learning to decipher meaning of compound words; (4) to develop reading comprehension of more extended narrative and expository passages; (5) to write, in relative length (200-250 characters long), personal narratives, informational narratives, comparison and discussion of viewpoints with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; (6) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed for students who have Chinese-speaking background and who can understand and speak conversational Chinese related to daily life situations. It aims to develop students' correct pronunciation, grammatical accuracy and overall competence in reading and writing. Students who pass this class can enroll in "Advanced Chinese 1".

This course is the second part of a one-year intermediate-level Chinese course designed for students who have completed NYU-SH’s Intermediate Chinese I or equivalent. It is designed to continue consolidating and developing overall aural-oral proficiency, gradually focusing more on semi-formal or formal linguistic expressions. Objectives are: (1) to further develop competence in obtaining information from more extended conversation; (2) to express and expound on, in more extended length, feelings and opinions on socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop more specialized vocabulary needed to discuss sociocultural topics; (4) to improve students’ ability to decipher meaning of compound words; (5) to further develop reading comprehension of extended narrative, expository and simple argumentative passages; (6) to learn to solve simple syntactical problems independently; (7) to write, in relative length (250-300) characters long) informational narratives, expository and simple argumentative passages with level-appropriate vocabulary and grammatical accuracy, as well as basic syntactical cohesion; and (7) to continue being acquainted with aspects of Chinese culture and society related to the course materials.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the first part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Intermediate Chinese II at NYU-SH, or who have at least the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to learn to apply formal linguistic expressions in speaking and writing; (2) to acquire specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics; (3) to develop reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to learn to make context-based guesses about the meaning of a new word and further enhance students’ ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to learn to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; and (6) to learn to employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Sample Syllabus

This course is the second part of a one-year Advanced Chinese course designed for students who have successfully completed Advanced Chinese I at NYU-SH, or who have the equivalent knowledge of Chinese upon registration. It is designed to reinforce and further improve students’ overall communicative competence by incorporating semi-formal or formal usages. The objectives of the course are: (1) to enhance further students’ oral and written communicative competence using formal linguistic expressions; (2) to expand further specialized vocabulary and patterns necessary for conducting formal discussions of socio-cultural topics relevant to today’s China; (3) to improve further students’ reading comprehension of texts with more advanced syntax; (4) to develop further their competence in making context-based guess about the meaning of a new word, and further enhance ability to analyze as well as produce sentences with more complex syntactical features; (5) to improve further their ability to write expository and argumentative passages in more extended length; (6) to improve their ability to effectively employ basic rhetoric devices in writing.

Sample Syllabus


Art and Arts Professions

Students will work with traditional and digital photographic practices to engage with the people, art, and traditions of China. The class will include field trips to museums, galleries and studios, allowing students to interact with outstanding local photographers, media-based artists, and the city's creative community. Assigned readings will help students understand the historical and theoretical context of photographic work, and deepen the meaning of critiques and discussions. Experimentation will be encouraged, and students will respond to the experiences, ideas, and influences they encounter abroad through the work they create. Projects may range from classical photographs to digital prints and installation.

Sample Syllabus

The contemporary art scene in China has developed quickly over the past three decades. The massive political, economic, and social changes the country has undergone since the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976 have dramatically altered the country’s cultural landscape. In this seminar course, the course will survey the main development areas in Chinese contemporary art from the end of the 1920s to the present day. Dedicated to responding to the new textures of China’s metropolitan culture, it will look at the relationship between visual arts, new media, architecture, and performance in the mega-city of Shanghai, often regarded as the cradle of Chinese modernity. The class will be complemented by guest lectures and visits to public museums, galleries and artists’ studios in and around Shanghai. Students will have the opportunity to meet leading figures from the art world in China as well as the international art community, including artists, museum directors, curators, art critics, and art dealers.

Sample Syllabus


Business

This course focuses on China’s political and economic development over the last century and a half with particular attention to the last 33 years, the so-called Reform Period. Our three primary objectives are to (1) understand the historical trajectory of China’s development path; (2) consider in what ways and to what degree the growth experiences of East Asia’s high-performing economies helped inform China’s economic policymakers decisions and shed light on the prospects for the long-term success of reforms in China; (3) assess the state of China’s contemporary political economy and the current role of the government in generating or inhibiting economic activity.

This course investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. The course develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems, and introduces students to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis and class discussion.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the field of marketing by introducing and developing central concepts and philosophies of marketing, and exploring the relationship of marketing with other business disciplines. Keeping in mind the perspectives of both producer and consumer, the course examines the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. The course concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Ethical issues in marketing are also addressed. In addition to lecture, the course uses case studies and student projects as methods for student learning.

Sample Syllabus

Every professional business person must be aware of how legal systems work and effect business decisions. Furthermore, the interaction between Law and Business is multidimensional involving international, ethical, and technological considerations. In this course, students examine how key areas of business law, including contracts, torts, and business organizations, influence the structure of domestic and international business relationships. Students actively participate in legal studies designed to enhance business skills such as analytical thinking, written communication, oral presentation, conflict resolution, and team work problem-solving.

Sample Syllabus

In this course, students learn how to increase their communication effectiveness for business and professional goals. During the semester, students focus on the strategic implications of communication for modern organizations. A variety of assignments are given to stress the following communication competencies: written, spoken and nonverbal communication basics for business; effective team communication strategies; informative, persuasive and collaborative presentations; communication techniques for required junior and senior year projects. Students regularly receive personal feedback about their writing and their oral presentations from the instructor.

Sample Syllabus


East Asian Studies

Students may apply 4 credits of non-language coursework taught at NYU Shanghai toward the East Asian Studies Major or Minor. Additional Major/Minor credit may be available for NYU Shanghai courses if approved in writing by the DUGS and as subject to Department regulations.

In this course we will select a number of critical issues in modern Chinese history to examine the political, social and cultural transformations of modern China. Topics of lectures include Confucianism and its modern fate, popular movements, the Great Leap Forward Movement, the role of Shanghai in modern China, Tiananmen Movement and the prospect of Chinese political reforms. The course will be approached through lectures, site visits, class discussions, and research.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines Chinese films in their social, cultural and political context. Spanning the history of Chinese film, this course traces the stylistic development of Chinese cinema, and the political and social movements that shaped film content and aesthetics as well as the structure of film production.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

This course explores the environmental situation in China by examining both the very serious environmental challenges that China faces and the governance system(s) that exist in China for dealing with those challenges. In order to assess these challenges and systems, the course introduces a comparative dimension – looking at not only the Chinese system, but the American system as well, examining the environmental challenges and governance system of the United States, as well as the broader context within which China and the U.S. together constitute the two primary sources of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Is it possible to compare the American and Chinese systems? Can concepts of governance and assessment be translated between the two systems? What can China learn from the U.S.? What can America learn from China? Will the profound differences in our political and economic systems make environmental cooperation impossible, leading inevitably to conflict? Will globalization and technological innovation lead to healthy competition and cooperation to address common problems?

Sample Syllabus


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Application information available here. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite. 

Sample Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

This course aims to complement and enhance the internship experience. Students will learn to critically examine their fieldwork in order to reflect upon what their particular, concrete experience reveals about life in contemporary Shanghai.

Sample Syllabus


History

In this course we will select a number of critical issues in modern Chinese history to examine the political, social and cultural transformations of modern China. Topics of lectures include Confucianism and its modern fate, popular movements, the Great Leap Forward Movement, the role of Shanghai in modern China, Tiananmen Movement and the prospect of Chinese political reforms. The course will be approached through lectures, site visits, class discussions, and research.

Sample Syllabus

From the Warring States period to the present, what have Chinese and others understood to be the meaning of “China,” and what have been the broad implications of this understanding? This course is divided into four chronological periods: Antiquity—from the period of the ‘central kingdoms’ to the formation of the early empire; Middle Period—China Among Equals; Early Modern: 1350-1910—China, Global Trade, and Imperialism; Modern: 1910-present—China Redux


Journalism

This course provides an introduction to the work of the reporter, with particular focus on covering China, and offers students a chance to learn and practice basic journalism skills, including news writing and descriptive/feature writing. Visiting speakers will also offer insights into the role of the journalist and the challenges faced, and provide additional feedback on students’ work and ideas.

Sample Syllabus


Law & Society

This course will study China’s governance in the context of America’s own governance system. We will consider how to compare American and Chinese governance systems, and whether and how concepts can be translated between them—so that the countries, and their citizens can learn from, and cooperate with, one another. In the process, we hope to learn about China, but also to reflect—in the light of 9/11 and Iraq-- more deeply on our own understanding of how American governance works—and how it is seen by the world.

Sample Syllabus


Media, Culture, & Communication

This course is designed to introduce contemporary media industries in China, involving print, broadcasting, film, PR, advertising, and new media. This course reviews the structures, functions, and influences of various forms of media industries. Practical media work is emphasized. Additionally, it analyzes existing issues on these media industries from historical, regulatory, social, and technological perspectives.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces the philosophy of cybernetic machines with reference to the technological trends affecting contemporary China. Topics will include: Chinese cyberspace and the Great Fire Wall; the revolutionary potential of microblogs; hacking; gaming; the ICT economy, maker innovations and machine intelligence.

Requires departmental approval prior to registration. Open only to NYU Media, Culture, & Communication students. Interested MCC students should contact Jonathan Martinez jm4599@nyu.edu


Metropolitan Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Application information available here. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite. 

Sample Syllabus

The main aim of this course is to facilitate a rich engagement with Shanghai. The underlying premise is that the city is a critical site of globalization. Rather than view globalization as an external force acting on Shanghai, this course aims instead to show how globalization is inherent in the city and that an investigation of the distinctive features of Shanghai -- from the abandoned factories now revived as creative clusters, to the lilong architecture, luxury malls and street peddlers -- sheds light on both the past and future of globalization.

Sample Syllabus


Politics

This course has been cancelled for the fall 2014 semester

This course combines two parts: (1) introduction to theories of international politics and, (2) their applications to the understanding of US-China relations. The first part examines competing approaches to international politics, explains their basic concepts and rationales, and evaluates their explanatory insights. The principal objective of this part is for students to develop an appreciation of the ways in which various theoretical perspectives lead to different understandings of the structures and practices of world politics. The second part offers students an advanced understanding of US-China relations, focusing on the post-Cold War period, with a special emphasis on issues of security, human rights and economy. This part is intended to provide the means for students to develop their own theoretically informed analyses of major issues in US-China relations, such us how China’s membership in the WTO affects American economy, including the quality of employment opportunities in the United States.

Sample Syllabus


Religious Studies

This course is a survey of the major historical and contemporary currents of China's religious thought and practice, including Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism and “popular religion”. It will focus on the interactions between such teachings and practices, as well as on the contributions of all four to Chinese culture. You will study various topics including divination, visual culture, ritual, ancestor worship, morality, longevity techniques, healing practices and meditation. A selected number of primary and secondary sources will be discussed in lecture; documentary films and visits to sacred spaces will be also be key constituents of the course.

Sample Syllabus


Sociology

The main aim of this course is to facilitate a rich engagement with Shanghai. The underlying premise is that the city is a critical site of globalization. Rather than view globalization as an external force acting on Shanghai, this course aims instead to show how globalization is inherent in the city and that an investigation of the distinctive features of Shanghai -- from the abandoned factories now revived as creative clusters, to the lilong architecture, luxury malls and street peddlers -- sheds light on both the past and future of globalization.

Sample Syllabus


Courses Offered by NYU Shanghai's Portal Campus

The following courses from departments at NYU Shanghai's portal campus (new fall 2013), while not officially cross-listed with Washington Square departments are open to students studying away at NYU Shanghai. Please note that some courses have limited enrollment space for study away students and are by permission only. Please check with your departmental advisor regarding any courses you wish to satisfy major, minor, or degree requirements.

Business and Finance

This course introduces students to the use of statistical methods. Topics include: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inference concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; correlation; analysis of variance; linear regression, including multiple regression analysis. Applications to empirical situations are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: None.


Core Science

Since the formation of trade routes connecting early civilizations, networks have been central to human exchange. Silk, jade, gold, and other goods, as well as the cultural elements of language, art, scientific discovery, philosophy and religion traveled the 6,500 km between southeast Asia and southern Europe on an elaborate system of trails, roads and waterways. This course will explore the development of several human-made networks beginning with these early trade routes. Further consideration will be given to the construction of transcontinental railways, the development of electrical telegraph and telephone systems, in addition to the evolution of modern digital communication platforms such as the world wide web. The cultural conditions that encouraged the emergence of these networks, as well as the social outcomes resulting from their adoption, will both be explored through readings and critical dialog. Students will become familiar with: economic principles; network theories and topologies; the development and standardization of protocols; methods for encoding information; concerns about infrastructure, logistics, and security; as well as legislation governing information ownership, privacy, and censorship. Students will also be asked to consider the future of networks as it relates to themes such as crowd-sourcing, software-defined networks, and the Internet of Things.


Cultural Foundations

Beginning with the Chinese arts of Zhezhi (paper folding) and Jianzhi (paper cutting) the paper craft movement has roots on all continents. This course reviews the history of both Chinese and international traditions, in addition to examining contemporary practices. Additionally, students will have hands-on experience through weekly exercises in the fundamentals of paper engineering techniques and basic conductive materials, creating movable books and sculptures.


Economics

Basic microeconomic principles: applications of supply and demand analysis; consumer choice; theory of the firm under perfect and imperfect competition; game theory and strategy; and theory and policy issues in market imperfections, such as monopoly and antitrust, externalities and regulation, imperfect information and regulation, income distribution, etc. Prerequisite: None.


Humanities

This course provides an introduction to the history and culture of Shanghai through the eyes of fiction writers. We will read short stories (in English translation) by Chinese, British, American, Japanese, French, Polish, and South African writers who lived in the city between 1910 and 2010. Their stories will take us on an imaginary city tour through time and space: from businessmen, politicians, and prostitutes gathering in the nightclubs of the old Bund, to Jewish refugees struggling to find a home in the poor shikumen neighborhoods of Hongkou, to teachers and students fighting political battles at the university campuses during the Cultural Revolution, and young urban youth pursuing cosmopolitan lifestyles in the global city of today. The course also includes trips to various places featured in the stories and guest lectures by some of Shanghai’s most famous writers today.


Interactive Technology and Media

What can computation add to human communication? Creating computer applications, instead of just using them, will give you a deeper understanding of the essential possibilities of computation. Conversely excitement about your project ideas for using computation will best propel your acquisition of skills necessary to realize those ideas. This fourteen week course is divided into two parts. The first portion starts with the expressive capabilities of the human body and how we move through the world. The Physical Computing skills will allow you to go past the limitations of the mouse, keyboard and monitor interface and at locations other than the home or the office. The platform for the class is a microcontroller (Arduino brand), a very small inexpensive single-chip computer that can be embedded anywhere and sense and actuate in the physical world. The core technical concepts include digital, analog and serial input and output. The second portion of the course focuses on fundamentals of computer programming (variables, conditionals, iteration, functions, and objects) as well as more advanced techniques such as data parsing, image processing, networking, computer vision, and 3D graphics. The Java-based 'Processing' programming environment is the primary vehicle. Processing is more oriented towards visual displays on desktops, laptops, tablets or smartphones but can also connect back to the physical sensor and actuators from the first part of the class. The course is designed for computer programming novices but the project-centered pedagogy will allow more experienced programmers the opportunity to play further with their project ideas and potentially make friends by helping the other students.


Mathematics

This course presents the foundations of calculus by examining functions and their derivatives and integrals, with an emphasis on proofs and theorems and an introduction to basic mathematical analysis. While the derivative measures the instantaneous rate of change of a function, the definite integral measures the total accumulation of a function over an interval. Indeed, the relationship between differentiation (finding a derivative) and integration (determining an integral) is described in the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: None.

Systems of linear equations, matrices, L U decomposition, determinants,vector spaces,linear independence, basis and dimensions, subspaces and quotient spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Jordan canonical forms, inner product and orthogonality, quadratic forms and extrema of functions,symmetric and positive matrices. Prerequisite: MATH-121 (Calculus) or Equivalent.

(Fast Track Honors Calculus) Function, limit and continuity; velocity, tangent lines and rate of changes, derivatives, differentials higher order derivatives and applications; extremas of functions; mean-value theorem, L'hospital's rule and Taylor expansions, implicit and inverse function differentiations and theorems; area and distance, definite integrals; fundamental theorem of calculus and change variables; functions of several variables ,limits, continuity and partial derivatives, extrema and constrained extrema of function; double and triple integrals; line and surface integrals; Divergence, Green and Stokes theorems. Prerequisite: MATH-121.


Social Foundations

This course provides a brief survey of Chinese philosophy from the pre-Qin period to the present. To capture the quintessence of traditional Chinese wisdom, it focuses on the three most influential schools of thought in ancient China, namely Confucianism from the classical period to Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism; Daoism from classical texts to Wei-Jin Neo-Daoism, and Buddhism, noting its sinicization and taking Zen as a paradigm case. In modern times, against the background of the exchange between Chinese and Western cultures, traditional Chinese wisdom obtained a new lease on life through the creative work of modern Chinese thinkers. Students examine the three most prominent schools of 20th-century Chinese philosophy, namely contemporary Neo-Confucianism, the Tsinghua school of realism, and Chinese Marxism.

Button: Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester

Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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