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Courses - Spring 2015

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Spring 2015 courses with days and times will be available in Albert, NYU's Student Information System the week of October 13, 2014. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students must participate in Global Orientations. Students do not need to enroll for this course during registration.
  • Enrollment in a Spanish Language course is required; select one that matches your skill level.
  • Students that have not previously taken a college-level Spanish class should review the posted information on the Spanish Language Placement Test and take the test or email requesting exemption as directed.
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass/fail.
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • FINC-UB 9002 Foundations of Finance has prerequisites, visiting students email global.academics@nyu.edu for permission.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

Spring 2014 | Fall 2014Spring 2015 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2016

 
 

Required Course for All Students

Global Orientations aims to put you (students) in direct contact with Spain, so that you have the opportunity to get to know and engage in Spanish culture and language, regardless of your level of Spanish. This workshop will help you to be able to engage in Spanish culture and language by means of an active, practical and lively learning experience. During Orientation week and over the course of the semester, you’ll attend sessions with NYU Madrid professors, tour Madrid and surrounding cities, visit two of Madrid’s most renowned art museums, take a weekend trip to a different part of Spain, and you’ll have the opportunity to take part in interactive workshops (Spanish cooking, wine or dance). Finally, you’ll read an article that will help you to reflect on your observations of and experiences in Madrid, and you’ll write a brief paper incorporating your conclusions. All in all, Global Orientations seeks to help you make the most of your experience in Madrid so that you leave knowing where you’ve been and how the experience may have affected you as a person. 


Spanish Language 

All students are required to take a Spanish language course (or course taught in Spanish) for graded credit. This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

Open to students with no previous training in Spanish and to others on assignment by placement test. NYU students: After completing this course, students who wish to continue studying Spanish must take a qualifying exam. Completes the equivalent of a year's elementary course in one semester.

Sample Syllabus

Completes the CORE language requirement for NYU students. Prerequisite for NYU students: SPAN-UA 2 or SPAN-UA 10 and passing grade on qualifying exam.

Promotes proficiency in reading and writing as well as oral performance. Completes the equivalent of a year's intermediate course in one semester.

Sample Syllabus

Continuation of SPAN-UA 3. Readings and discussions of contemporary Hispanic texts and review of the main grammatical concepts of Spanish. Completion of this course fulfills the MAP foreign language requirement. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: SPAN-UA 20 or SPAN-UA 4; permission of the department; or a satisfactory score on the SAT II, AP or NYU language placement exam. For non-native speakers only. Highly recommended to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9551 Debating Current Issues in Spain. Students of Spanish Speaking Background: see SPAN-UA 9110 Techniques of Translation

Advanced course designed to expand and consolidate lexical and grammatical understanding of the language and to introduce fundamental principles of expository writing as they apply to Spanish, through exercises, readings, and intensive practice of various expository prose techniques and styles. For nonnative speakers only.

Sample Syllabus


Courses Taught in Spanish at the Intermediate Level

To be taken concurrently with Intermediate Spanish (SPAN-UA 9020 or SPAN-UA 9004)

Only for students concurrently registered in SPAN-UA 9020 or SPAN-UA 9004. This course does not count for Spanish minors or majors.

The course is designed for students in SPAN-UA 9020 or SPAN-UA 9004 that would like to perfect their Spanish, as they expand their knowledge regarding literature, cinema, and social and political problems that exist today within modern Spanish society. The reading of different texts, such as newspaper articles and short stories, and various videos and films throughout the semester will serve to expand lexicon, strengthen grammar and improve students’ language oral and written skills. The students will participate actively in class discussions and be guided to conduct their own research on topics related to Spain today.

Sample Syllabus

Only for students concurrently registered in SPAN-UA 9020.

This course is directed to students in SPAN-UA 9020 that would like to perfect their Spanish and acquire knowledge about Hispanic language and culture in the United States. The study and debate in class on a variety of materials (literary texts and periodicals, advertisements, radio programs from the Internet, movies) will permit us to take on current topics related to the Hispanic presence in American society, for example, emigration, border culture, Hispanic media, "Latin" identity, problems of gender and ethnicity, the political importance of Hispanic communities and bilingualism.

The principal objective of the course is the development of the student's communicative capacity through written and oral presentations, debates, and commentaries on each week's materials, as well as listening comprehension and vocabulary exercises. As a secondary objective, the student should acquire a consciousness of the reality of the United States as a place of encounter and transformation of different cultures, including Hispanic cultures that today play a predominant role. 

Sample Syllabus


Courses Taught in Spanish at the Advanced Level

Prerequisite SPAN-UA 0100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100. For students of Spanish speaking background this course replaces SPAN-UA 9100.

Comparison of Spanish and English grammar, syntax, and style, mainly by examining American and Spanish movie scripts and plays. Special attention is paid to colloquial expressions and cognates in both languages.

 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100. For non-native Spanish speakers only.

This course is designed for students who wish to attain a command of Spanish in relation to the worlds of business and international relations. Special emphasis on the development of oral expression through activities that focus on business practices. 

Sample Syllabus

Formerly titled Critical Approaches: Reading, Writing and Textual Analysis

Prerequisite of  SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100.

Introduction to literary analysis through close readings of texts from the early to modern periods of peninsular Spanish and Spanish American literatures. Engages students in the practice of textual explication, provides basic critical skills, and encourages reflection on literature as a system.

Sample Syllabus

 

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 200 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9200.

This course offers an introduction to the construction of modern Spain through the study of a variety of cultural texts—literature, film, the visual arts, advertising and pop music--from the 19th century to the end of the 1980s. We will analyze the works that writers and artists have used to articulate their views of modernity and of the conflicts between centers and peripheries (in a territorial but also a in political, economic, and social sense), focusing on the following axes: Spanish nationalism/peripheral nationalism; urban Spain/rural Spain; victors/defeaters (in the Civil War); and public/private space (masculine/feminine).

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100.

From the 8th century until the 17th century, Islam played a crucial role in the history of the Iberian Peninsula. Today this period is often portrayed as one of inter-religious harmony, while al-Andalus is simultaneously mourned in contemporary Islamist discourse as a lost paradise. While we look at the history of Al-Andalus and assess the importance of the contributions of Al-Andalus to Europe and America, we evaluate the significance of its legacy in modern Spain. Furthermore, we will study the protagonist role that Spain has played in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic countries during the Modern Age. Students will gain further understanding and contextualization of current Arab-Muslim geopolitics. As a case study, we will address the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, as well as its ensuing process of decolonization and the consequences that shape the current international relations between the two neighboring countries, Spain and Morocco.

Note:  This Class does NOT currently include a trip to Morocco as in past semesters.

Sample Syllabus

 Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100.

 

Art History Students: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

 

A gallery course focusing on the baroque schools of Rubens and Rembrandt, "tenebrist" painting, Velázquez, and the etchings and paintings of Goya. Ends with a survey of the painters of the 18th and 19th centuries.

 

Sample Syllabus

A study of society, culture, and ethnic groups in Spain and Iberoamerica. The Latin American social reality and the most important historical processes that have shaped present-day Latin America are discussed, as well as the cultural relationship that exists between Spain and Iberoamerica.

 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite of  SPAN-UA 200 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9200.

In this course, we will read both the first and second part of the Don Quijote and analyze it's significance from literary, philosophical, political and social perspectives.

Sample Syllabus   

Prerequisite for NYU students: SPAN-UA 100 or concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100. For non-native Spanish speakers only.

The course Debating Current Issues in Spain aims to develop students’ awareness about the contemporary culture of Spain, while improving students’ oral competence in Spanish. With this purpose, the course will analyze different conversational techniques and linguistic resources in order to facilitate the students’ performance on presentations, debates, formal and informal conversations, interviews, reports, etc. The culture and daily life of Spain in the 21st century will be examined through these oral practices in Spanish. Spain will be presented in its diversity, richness, and uniqueness with the help of supporting materials such as newspaper articles, TV and radio programs, commercials, short films, chats, etc. Finally, our goal is that the students gain an understanding of the new culture and that they be able to create new intercultural spaces by means of the comparisons to their own culture. This course is based on culture, language and training in oral communication. 

Sample Syllabus

No Prerequisites if taught in English.

When Taught in Spanish: Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100 with permission of the director.

 

A study of Spain and its integration into the European Common Market. The historical background examines Europe in the aftermath of World War II, Spain under Franco's dictatorship and its relationship to other European countries, as well as the events leading up to the actual foundation of the European Economic Community (EEC). Emphasis is on the negotiations leading to Spain's incorporation into the EEC, and a detailed analysis is given of the present-day European Common Market and its goals for the future.

 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100.

This course approaches Surrealism as historical fact and as a current system, somehow useful to establish creative relations. The course studies the historical precedents, creators, and offspring of the surrealist phenomenon.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100. For students of Spanish speaking background this course replaces SPAN-UA 9100.

This course will provide students with basic journalistic skills so that they may report on their cultural experience in Spain. We will work with newspaper articles, podcasts, radio and TV programs from the Spanish media to cover current social, political and cultural issues, such as immigration, national identities, regional differences, gender roles, tourism and famous personalities. The coverage of political and cultural developments in Spain in the American media will also be examined to complement our newsgathering and research. Course projects include the publication of a blog with articles on the students´ experience at NYU in Madrid – planned trips, visits to museums and other activities - as well as visits to a radio or TV station in Madrid. Our aim will be to acquire a broad understanding of contemporary Spanish society while developing new linguistic skills in Spanish. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 100 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9100.

A survey of Spanish cinema from the early beginnings of the silent movie to the present day. Important figures, such as Luis Buñuel, Luis García Berlanga, Edgar Neville, Juan Antonio Bardem, Fernando Fernán Gómez, Carlos Saura, and others are studied, as well as the phenomenon of cinema as a reflection of the political, social, and cultural development of the country and its people. A selection of the most representative films is shown in class.

 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite of SPAN-UA 200 or to be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9200 with permission of the director.

In recent years, the idea of “the three cultures” of medieval Spain — Christianity, Islam and Judaism — has become a popular ideal and model for modernity among a wide variety of thinkers and writers; and both utopian and distopian visions of Sefarad and Andalus (the Hebrew and Arabic terms that refer to the Iberian Peninsula) permeate discourses on politics, religion and even education. This course will examine the ways in which that nostalgia for a lost Andalus or Sefarad is both explored as a theme and used as a device in a wide variety of modern novels and short stories (as well as some poetry), and the ways in which modern authors deploy this trope to comment on the worlds they inhabit. Reading medieval Spanish texts alongside the writing they inspired in modernity will provide a diachronic framework for better understanding medieval Iberian literature and will also raise questions about the salience of the past for the present. 


Courses Taught in English 

This survey will examine the major artists and institutions that shaped the development of Spanish art from 1888, the date of Barcelona's Universal Exposition, to the end of the Spanish Civil War. The course takes as it's working model the question of art's relation to social movements, including: the rising tides of cultural and political nationalism in the Basque and Catalan regions; the Colonial Disaster of 1898 and the question of national regeneration; the impact of fin-de-siglo anarchist and worker's movements; the birth of authoritarian politics with the Dictatorship of Primo de Rivera; and the ideological chaos and social violence unleashed during the Spanish Civil War) Class sessions examine the complex roles played by some of Spain's most prominent artists and architects -- Antoni Gaudí, Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, Luis Buñuel, Josep Lluís Sert, and Salvador Dalí -- and their multivalent responses to modernization, political instability, and social praxis. The course is supplemented by regular visits to the Museo Nacional de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid's museum of modern art.

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. 

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and a minimum of 16 hours of fieldwork per week (two full days). Internship placements are made by EUSA, an internship placement organization partnering with NYU.

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Prerequisites: (1) STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Models OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (6 credits) OR ECON-UA 18 Statistics (4 credit) plus ECON-UA 19/STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) OR STAT-UB 1 Statistics for Business Control (4 credit) plus STAT-UB 3 Regression/Forecasting (2 credit) AND (2) one of the following: ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics OR ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II, OR ECON-UA 5 Introduction to Economic Analysis, AND (3) ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting AND (4) At least Sophomore Standing.

A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and as a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels from producer to consumer and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases and projects to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas.

Taking advantage of its location in Madrid, this course analyzes the ways inwhich historical, geopolitical, cultural, artistic, and popular viewsfunction to constitute and continuously transform a national culture.Specifically, the course concentrates on epistemological constructionsof Spain—the idea of Spain—that emerges from competing external andinternal perspectives. Students will examine how this national cultureis constructed in three modules. The first analyzes Spain from NorthAfrican perspectives as, on the one hand, the traditional site and mythof a lost paradise in Sephardic nostalgic poetry as well asHispano-Arabic literary traditions and, on the other, as the place towhich some contemporary, radical movements view as a strategic goal.The second module looks at American perspectives in which the idea ofSpain pits notions of Spanish imperial power and grandeur against theBlack Legend, a term that protestant circles in Europe and the UnitedStates promoted to attack the legitimacy of Spain’s New World empire.The third perspective focuses on European views and analyzes thedepiction of Spain as the embodiment of German and French Romanticideals beginning at the end of the 17th century and the reemergence ofthe same notion during the Spanish Civil War (1933-36). Throughout thecourse, students will have the opportunity to examine some of the principal textual and visual images that contribute to the historicaland contemporary construction of a national culture that emerged atgeographic and cultural crossroads.

Sample Syllabus

 

 Art History Students: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

A gallery course focusing on the baroque schools of Rubens and Rembrandt, "tenebrist" painting, Velázquez, and the etchings and paintings of Goya. Ends with a survey of the painters of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Sample Syllabus

This course examines the interaction between two coupled systems, the Earth system and humanity’s political systems. Beginning with an analysis of the effects of anthropogenic industrial carbon dioxide gas emissions on the Earth system as derived from the scientific evidence this course attempts to understand the reaction of the global, European and Spanish political governance systems to these transformations. In order to understand something as apparently specific as the impact of climate change in the Iberian peninsula and the Spanish state’s response to it we must first understand, therefore, how the United Nations and the European Union are responding to climate change since the Spanish political system’s control and mitigation policies are largely determined by these two larger governance systems’ responses.

Sample Syllabus 

This course is an introduction to urban politics in Europe. It is designed to provide the student with practical and theoretical tools to understand and critically analyze European cities. We will take a close look at the social, political and urban challenges these cities are currently facing.

 

Both English & Spanish Taught sections will be offered in Spring 2015

From the 8th century until the 17th century, Islam played a crucial role in the history of the Iberian Peninsula. Today this period is often portrayed as one of inter-religious harmony, while al-Andalus is simultaneously mourned in contemporary Islamist discourse as a lost paradise. While we look at the history of Al-Andalus and assess the importance of the contributions of Al-Andalus to Europe and America, we evaluate the significance of its legacy in modern Spain. Furthermore, we will study the protagonist role that Spain has played in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic countries during the Modern Age. Students will gain further understanding and contextualization of current Arab-Muslim geopolitics. As a case study, we will address the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, as well as its ensuing process of decolonization and the consequences that shape the current international relations between the two neighboring countries, Spain and Morocco.

Note: This Class does NOT currently include a trip to Morocco as in past semesters.

Sample Syllabus

This course is a study of comparative human rights between European countries, including
Spain, and the United States of America. International human rights legislation imposes
the same obligations on all signatory countries. Despite this, however, interpretation and
application of these rights vary considerably between countries. Students will explore a set
of controversial issues in order to understand the complex differences between the United
States and European countries’ interpretation of human rights obligations, and will also look
at how these differences are portrayed in society by comparing international and national
media coverage of the issues.

Sample Syllabus

 

The city of Madrid will be the primary object of study in this course: its history, its architecture, its people, its neighborhoods, and its place in the Spanish imaginary. Through readings, film viewings, walking tours, and the production of their own documentary shorts, students will have an opportunity to explore, engage with, and document aspects of this protean city. The course, moreover, will provide an introduction to documentary theory, tradition and practice, will encourage students to look, listen and explore Madrid with a documentarian’s gaze, to represent the city from new perspectives, and to seek out stories that deepen their understanding of Madrid and Spain.

Button: Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Spring Semester


Priority: September 15

Regular: October 15

Applications received after October 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.

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