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Course Offerings - Spring 2012

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.

Issues in Contemporary British Politics and Culture (zero to two credits) is a required course for all students.

Course days/times can be found on Albert.

Spring 2012 | Fall 2012 | Spring 2013

 

Required Course For All Students

Required of all students enrolled at NYU London. No grade. Pass/Fail only.

Professor C. Bloom and others
This course will introduce students to the context of life in modern Britain through a series of talks by prominent figures in British society. The main objectives of the course are to give students access to those at the top of British politics and culture; to make students aware of the unique characteristics of British culture and to examine the reasons for the far-reaching changes in British society over the last thirty or forty years. It is important for NYU undergraduates who are studying abroad to study the socio-political context of that country as part of their experience abroad. This course will begin to explore important social and political issues that Britain has handled differently than the United States. 

Sample Syllabus


Art History

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History elective credit.

Professor B. Hanson
British designers are playing an increasingly important part on the world stage. This course examines changing attitudes to design in Britain: from the eighteenth century, when it played a central role in the modernisation of the country, to the Millennium and beyond, when it is being called upon to rekindle some lost glory. We will ask whether there are features about British design over the last 250 years which are distinctively British; and to what extent British designers have been informed by developments in the rest of the world.

Design now seems all-encompassing, and this very fact also raises broader questions. Have we overvalued this work of the mind over more traditional hand-skills? Are we becoming cynical in the face of endless "rebrandings" (which includes the rebranding of cities and whole countries)? Does design necessarily falsify, or paper over the cracks? And is it good for the planet?

The course format consists of Lectures, and Visits: to museums, London sites etc. 

Sample Syllabus

This course is cross-listed with IDSEM-UG 9102 (Gallatin).

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

Professor M. Bohm-Duchen
This 15 week course will take an in-depth yet wide-ranging look at an important but curiously neglected aspect of modern western visual culture. Within a broadly chronological structure, topics to be dealt with will include the following: the relationship between art and atrocity, and the attendant problem of the aestheticisation of horror; the crucial influence of photography and the growth of mass communications; the issue of censorship, both external and internal, and the related issue of the "limits of representation" (above all, in relation to the Holocaust and Hiroshima); the distinction between official and unofficial war art, and between art and propaganda, between art that endorses and even glorifies war and an art of protest; issues of gender and sexuality; questions of cultural memory and the memorialization process, and the representation of war in contemporary art practice.

It will consist of a combination of informal lectures, student presentations, at least one gallery visit, and the occasional film showing. 


Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

Professor M. Douglas-Scott
A survey of British painting, sculpture and architecture of the 17ththrough 20th centuries. Museums, galleries, churches, palaces and stately homes in and around London will be visited to examine and critique major works.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History elective credit.

Professor E. Diestelkamp
London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape.

This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else. 

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

 Professor J. Beckett

London is the center of the British art world. This course will examine painting and sculpture of the 20th century with an emphasis on work after World War II. Recent art in Britain will be studied with trips to the museums, galleries and installations of significant new work. The format of the course will stress active visits to collections. Artists likely to be included are Henry Moore, Ben Nicholson, Lucien Freud, Francis Bacon, Anthony Caro, Richard Hamilton, David Hockney, Gilbert and George, Damien Hirst, and Rachel Whiteread. 

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

Professor M. Douglas-Scott
London has some of the richest collections of renaissance art in the world. Students in this course will be brought into direct contact with a large variety of artefacts to be found in museums and galleries such as the National Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Museum as well as the British Library. Works by Van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Durer and Holbein will be examined alongside those of less well-known artists. Rather than provide a standard chronological narrative of European Art History c. 1400- c. 1600, focus will be placed on subject areas such as the altarpiece and the private devotional image, the renaissance portrait, graphic practices, print culture, the materials and functions of sculpture, myth and allegory, the cabinet of curiosities, the concept of the 'Renaissance' itself. These topics will not be organised around traditional national or regional 'schools' considered in isolation from one another but instead interconnections will be explored between the development of different types, technical processes and cultural practices across the Netherlands, France, Germany and Italy. A special case will be made of the English Renaissance, in order to place it within the wider European context through additional visits to Westminster Abbey and Hampton Court. 

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History Elective credit & Urban Design credit.

Professor G. Stamp
British architecture is studied, from the Roman remains to the Post-Modern ITV Studios in London. Architecture, urban systems, preservation, and planning issues will be studied. While examining the past and present, the future of architecture will also be explored with an emphasis on the importance of renovating and refurbishing old buildings. There will be site visits in and around the City.

Sample Syllabus


Biology

Prerequisite: high school chemistry and BIOL-UA 11, Principles of Biology I or equivalent

Students registering for this course must also register for the Laboratory section

Professor V. Wells
Introductory course mainly for science majors designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics, and history and classification of life forms and evolution. 

Sample Syllabus

Taken in conjunction with the Principles of Biology II Lecture

Professor V. Wells
Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.


Business

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Analysis (also accepted: STAT-UB 1, ECON-UA 18, or ECON-UA 20), ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics (also accepted: ECON-UA 2 or ECON-UA 5), and ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting.

Professor D. Nitzsche
A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Sample Syllabus

Professor D. Bourne
Investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. Develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems. Introduces the student to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis, and class discussion.

Sample Syllabus

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

Professors C. Love & V. Mitchell

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and as a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels from producer to consumer and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases and projects to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Analysis (also accepted: ECON-UA 18, ECON-UA 20, or BOTH STAT-UB 1 and STAT-UB 3)

 Professor J. Beasley

Designed to give students a better understanding of how firms can gain competitive advantage from their operations function. Typically this requires the firm to achieve, at a minimum, cost, quality and ecological parity; responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs and desires; rapid time to market; process technology leadership; and sufficient and responsive capacity. A problem-solving framework is developed that enables students to undertake managerial and technical analysis that should result in the desired competitive advantage. Both service and manufacturing case examples are utilized.

Sample Syllabus

Professor T. Greener/ G. Cohen
This course provides the theoretical fundamentals in communication, applies communication strategy to oral and written business assignments, and focuses on how organizations communicate to their varied internal and external stakeholders.

Sample Syllabus


Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 243, Organic Chemistry I or its equivalent

Students registering for this course must also register for the Laboratory section

Professor T. Toube & Professor D. Urch
Continuation of Organic Chemistry I, emphasizing alcohols, amines, ethers, and carbonyl compounds. Some topics related to compounds of relevance to biochemistry (carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids) 

Sample Syllabus (Toube)

Sample Syllabus (Urch)

Taken in conjunction with the Organic Chemistry II Lecture

Professor D. Urch
Microscale experiments involving the synthesis of organic materials are covered. An extensive research project is conducted in the second half of the semester. The use of IR and NMR spectroscopy is explored.

Sample Syllabus


Chinese Language

Professor Guo

Introductory course in modern Chinese using Lin’s College Chinese. Covers both spoken and written aspects of the language. Open to students who have had no training in Chinese, the course includes translation from and into Chinese and a basic study of elementary Chinese grammar.


Cinema Studies

Students registering for this class must also register for the Screenings section.

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

Prof. P. Drummond
This course provides an exciting and challenging introduction to British Cinema, studying the rich and varied relationships between the society and its films. It is organised in four main parts, offering an Introduction to Film Studies; a look at National Identity and the Cinema in relation to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the UK as a whole; case studies in key authors Mike Leigh and Ken Loach; and approaches to narrative and genre.

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this class must also register for the Lecture section. 


Cultures and Contexts (Morse Academic Plan)

Open to all students. For NYU, fulfills MAP Cultures & Contexts requirement.

Prof. P. Woods
This class meets the requirements of  NYU Cultures and Context (MAP)  courses in that it introduces students to an in-depth academic study of changing views of British national identity and culture, using a variety of primary and secondary sources. Britain is a multi-national state,  a union of 4 nations, each with their own distinctive cultures and heritages.  Three of the nations, Wales, Scotland and Ireland have been brought under the English monarchy and political system, and, in the case of the first two, they have been long-term partners in the benefits accruing to the largest empire the world has seen and the first, and for a long time, the most successful industrial nation.  The height of that unity was probably in the period of the Second World War and its aftermath. Since then, with the collapse of the British Empire, Britain's membership of the European Union, devolution of power to Scotland and Wales, the union has come under increasing pressure from centrifugal forces.  The course examines the image that Britain presents to the world, the myths on which the national identity of the component nations were formed and the institutions that might be considered to hold the union together today. This involves looking at the self-image of Britain in relation to empire, foreign policy, immigration and multiculturalism, monarchy, parliament , sport  and media representations.  British national identity is revealed as an increasingly contested concept in a globalised world.

Sample Syllabus


Drama

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of £130 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

Professor M. Hattaway
Explores the works of Shakespeare as text and performance. A variety of critical methodologies, including biographical and cultural analysis, are used to reveal the continuing vitality of these plays and their relevance to the theatre of our time.

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this class must also register for the Lecture section.


Dramatic Literature

Cross-listed with ENGL-UA 9133 (English)

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of £280 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

Professor N. Jones
This course, designed to introduce students to the range of 20th-century drama staged in the contemporary London theater scene, presents a wide variety of British, American, and multicultural works currently playing. Students analyze the history of the modern theatre in London. Emphasis is placed on comparative interpretation of texts and the dramatic performances of works.

Cross-listed with ENGL-UA 9133 (English)

Students registering for this course must also register for the Lecture section.


Economics

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 2 and MATH-UA 121 (Calculus I). (Not open to NYU Stern students.)

Professor Verry
Examines the manner in which producers, consumers, and resource owners acting through the market determine the prices and output of goods, the allocation of productive resources, and the functional distribution of incomes. The price system is seen as a network of interrelated decisions, with the market process serving to communicate information to decision makers.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 1, ECON-UA 2, and MATH-UA 121.

Professor Hannah
Study of aggregate economic analysis with special attention paid to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation. Critically examines both the theories and the policies associated with them.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisite: ECON-UA 9001, Economic Principles or ECON-UA 9005, Introduction to Economic Analysis

Professor S. Hannah
The principal characteristics of the financial system and its current challenges; derivatives, financial innovation and the banking industry; money supply and monetary policy; bonds, equities and interest rates; financial supervision and regulation; pricing of financial securities and balanced portfolios; foreign exchange and how currency markets impact policy and asset choices; international policy co-ordination; banking crises and reform programmes.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisite: ECON-UA 9001, Economic Principles and ECON-UA 9002, Economic Principles II

Professors J. Olmo & J. Saraswati
This course focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department’s more advanced course in V31.0324. The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Sample Syllabus


English

This course cannot be taken for NYU English major credit.

Professor C. Bloom

On Christmas Day, 1764 Horace Walpole published The Castle of Otranto, the very first Gothic novel. The Gothic flourished especially in the nineteenth century, creating a whole vocabulary of new creatures and landscapes and two of the great books of the genre: Frankenstein And Dracula. This course concentrates on the great works of Gothic which are central to an understanding of literature, film, early Romanticism and popular culture. Specialising on the works of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we will also explore how those texts were reinvented for film and what new elements were added in the twentieth century. Using a selection of texts and using a variety of approaches from the historical to the post modern and the feminist to queer theory we will explore the multifarious levels of meaning in Gothic texts as well as looking at narrative strategies and a variety of themes including the political and revolutionary, the erotic and the exotic, the Promethian and the undead, the role of religion, the role of women, the Wandering Jew and the 'mock' medieval.

Sample Syllabus

Professor Leya Landau
This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film). We will also examine the texts in relation to issues such as gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals. 

Sample Syllabus

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of £250 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

ENGL-UA 9133.001 (Cross-listed with DRLIT-UA 9133.001) - 4 points - Open to Theatre and English majors/minors ONLY. ENGL-UA 9133.002 - 4 points - Open to non-majors/minors ONLY

Professor N. Jones
This course, designed to introduce students to the range of 20th-century drama staged in the contemporary London theater scene, presents a wide variety of British, American, and multicultural works currently playing. Students analyze the history of the modern theatre in London. Emphasis is placed on comparative interpretation of texts and the dramatic performances of works. 

Sample Syllabus

Cross-listed with DRLIT-UA 9133 (Dramatic Literature)

Students registering for this course must also register for the Lecture section.

Professor N. Jones
Both lecture sections take theatre visits together. 

Professor M. Ferguson
This course will examine the major British novels of the 19th Century in the context of their setting in London and British culture. The course will include visits to London sites presented in the works that will be read. Readings include such major novelists as Dickens, Thackeray, Wilde, Woolf, and others. 

Sample Syllabus

Professor J. Majeed
This course explores the meaning of colonialism and postcolonialism in India by examining its historical background, its main themes and its defining problems. The course introduces students to some of the key texts of British cultural and educational policy in India. It also gives students the opportunity to examine a major ethnographic text. The course will then grapple with a cross-section of colonial and postcolonial literary representations of India. The focus here will be on issues of identity and strategies of narrative in colonialist and nationalist texts. The course concludes with an overall view of postcolonial studies as it relates to India and some suggestions as to its future developments. 

Sample Syllabus


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Cross listed with SOC-UA 9452 (Sociology) and HIST-UA 9452 (History)

Professor D. Feldman
To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

Cross-listed with ARTH-UA 9650 (Art History)

Professor M. Bohm-Duchen

This 15 week course will take an in-depth yet wide-ranging look at an important but curiously neglected aspect of modern western visual culture. Within a broadly chronological structure, topics to be dealt with will include the following: the relationship between art and atrocity, and the attendant problem of the aestheticisation of horror; the crucial influence of photography and the growth of mass communications; the issue of censorship, both external and internal, and the related issue of the "limits of representation" (above all, in relation to the Holocaust and Hiroshima); the distinction between official and unofficial war art, and between art and propaganda, between art that endorses and even glorifies war and an art of protest; issues of gender and sexuality; questions of cultural memory and the memorialization process, and the representation of war in contemporary art practice.

It will consist of a combination of informal lectures, student presentations, at least one gallery visit, and the occasional film showing. 


History

Professor S. Inwood
The course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London's changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world has ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size. Each week (unless there is a field trip) there will be a lecture and a discussion in which you will be able to present ideas and information gathered from lectures and from your weekly reading. There will also be four walking tours of parts of London which relate to the period we are studying at a particular time. 

Sample Syllabus

Professor D. Judd
This course will focus on a history of Modern Imperialism from the beginning of the nineteenth century to post-Second World War decolonisation: with particular reference to the British Empire.

Sample Syllabus

Professor A. Crozier
Covers the impact of World War II, the postwar division of Europe, the onset of the cold war, the economic recovery and transformation of Western Europe, Stalinism in Eastern Europe, the 1960s and events of 1968, the origins and development of the European community, and the cultural and intellectual life of European nations in this period. Ends with a discussion of the Eastern European revolutions of 1989 and their significance, together with the reunification of Germany, for the future of the continent. 

Sample Syllabus

Cross listed with SOC-UA 9452 (Sociology) and IDSEM-UG 9101 (Gallatin)

Professor D. Feldman
To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

Cross-listed with MEIS-UA 9694 (Middle Eastern Studies)

Professor K. Hirschler
This course examines the evolution of diplomatic, trade, and cultural contacts between Islam and the West. Particular attention is paid to the complex relationship that developed between these two civilizations and their historical impact on each other.

Sample Syllabus


Journalism & Mass Communication

Students in this course must also register for the Methods and Practice Theatre visit on Thursday evenings.

This course carries an additional fee of £180 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.Students should also be prepared to pay up to £120 for extra tickets while in London as part of the Methods & Practice course.

Professor M. Wolf
Using the cultural life of London as its focus, this course aims to enable students to report on the diversity of cultural and artistic activity in the British capital in eight main areas - film, photography, literature, architecture, music, visual arts, travel, and London in literature. Several forms and techniques will be explored through lecture, discussion and assignments, including: news reports, interviews, reviews (film, literature, theater), feature stories, essays, and commentaries. During the course, students will learn not only about London's cultural landscape but they will be encouraged to examine it in various journalistic and literary forms. Weekly theatre visits are a key component of this course.

Sample Syllabus

Students in this course must also register for the Methods and Practice: Reporting the Arts Lecture. 

Professor T. Fenton
Designed to interrogate the impact of various forms of media on "society" and various notions of society on "media." Students consider conventional and unconventional media in Britain - from the London Times to movies to fashion magazines - in an effort to interpret British culture. The key question is not "Is this text 'good'?" but "What does this text mean?"

Sample Syllabus 


Mathematics

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in V63.0121 Calculus I or the equivalent.

Professor A. Bijura

Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer's rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms.

Sample Syllabus


Media, Culture, & Communication

Professor D. Thussu
A review of theories and evidence of cultural and political transformations in culture underway in the era of media proliferation, multinational conglomerates, and cyberspace. The role of international flows and national differences.


Metropolitan Studies

Professor Y. Evans
An urban centre for nearly two millennia, London has both shaped and been shaped by processes stretching over ever widening geographical scales, to claim its place within a select network of cities that are said to command contemporary globalisation. This course explores London’s evolving global reach, examining its role in key economic, social, political, cultural and spatial processes and identifying the effects that these have in turn had in its own urban life and landscape. The course briefly documents London’s establishment as an outpost of the Roman Empire in early history to its rise as the politico-administrative heart of the British Empire, to focus on London’s emergence as a global city. Largely oriented by the work of Human Geography scholars, the course examines the unravelling of London’s global connections through concepts such as urban space and place, globalisation, spatial division of labour, networks and flows, migration, transnationalism and multiculturalism.

The course is based on a mix of lectures and student-led seminars, and also includes a guided city walk and a museum visit. Lectures by the course convenor address the key themes of the weekly programme. Students are required to read designated texts for the week ahead. In seminars, students present and discuss their findings from different learning activities (readings, field walk, museum visit, their personal experience of London, lectures). Students are expected to participate actively in learning activities, especially seminars, and their participation constitutes one assessment component. 

Sample Syllabus


Middle Eastern Studies

Cross-listed with POL-UA 9540 (Politics)

Professor H. M. Segal

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Sample Syllabus

Cross-listed with HIST-UA 9520 (History)

Professor K. Hirschler
This course examines the evolution of diplomatic, trade, and cultural contacts between Islam and the West. Particular attention is paid to the complex relationship that developed between these two civilizations and their historical impact on each other.

Sample Syllabus


Philosophy

Professor A. Price
Examines fundamental questions of moral philosophy. What are our most basic values and which of them are specifically moral values? What are the ethical principles, if any, by which we should judge our actions, ourselves, and our lives?

Sample Syllabus

Professor A. Price
Discusses general questions concerning the nature of reality and truth. What kind of things exist? Are there minds or material bodies? Is change illusory? Are human actions free or causally determined? What is a person and what, if anything, makes someone one and the same person?

Sample Syllabus


Physics

Prerequisite: PHYS-UA 9011, General Physics I with a grade of C- or better

Students registering for this course must also register for the Laboratory section and the Recitation Section. Students should note that the Physics lab takes place at King’s College in Waterloo. This is roughly a 30 minute bus journey from the academic centre.

Professor K. Whitehead
This course is a continuation of V85.9011. This course is composed of a lecture and laboratory-recitation. Topics include electric charge, field, and potential; magnetic forces and fields; resistive, capacitive, and inductive circuits; electromagnetic induction; wave motion, electromagnetic waves; geometrical optics; interference, diffraction, and polarization of light; relativity; atomic and nuclear structure; elementary particle physics. 

Sample Syllabus

Professor G. Wilson
Taken in Conjunction with the General Physics II Lecture and Recitation. Students should note that the Physics lab takes place at King's College in Waterloo. This is roughly a 30 minute bus journey from the academic centre.

Professor S. Zochowksi
Taken in Conjunction with the General Physics II Lecture and Lab. 


Politics

Professor S. Kelly
Introduction to the politics and society of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Traces the political and social development of the historic countries of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales; the growth of British hegemony and imperialism; the politics of decline and decay; and the promise of rebirth. Studies contemporary political institutions and processes that have undergone massive transformation over the past 50 years. Examines the continuing conflict and terrorism in Northern Ireland and dynamics of change in the Thatcher era and beyond.

Sample Syllabus

Cross-listed with MEIS-UA 9750 (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies)

Professor H. Segal

Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.

Sample Syllabus

Professor E. Thielemann
This course critically investigates European integration, the operation of the EU as a political system and European policies. The course explores the origins, development, institutions, major policies, policy-making, current problems and matters of controversy of the European Community / Union. The major approaches applied to explain integration as well as the complex operation of the EU as a political system are described and discussed. The political and economic logic behind different national perspectives on European integration are examined.

Sample Syllabus

Prof. Newman

Characteristics and conditions of war and peace and the transition from one to the other from the perspective of political and social science. Examines the role and use of coercion in global affairs, with emphasis on attempts to substitute negotiation, bargaining, market forces, politics, and law for the resort to massive violence in moderating disputes. Considers recent developments in both the theory and practice of peacebuilding demonstrating the differing ways in which particular conflicts tend to be viewed by participants, external commentators and policy-makers.  Students will also undertake their own research on a case study of conflict.

The course will be taught in the form of an informal lecture and a class discussion, and students will present preliminary versions of their case studies to the class. A visiting speaker from an organisation dealing with issues of violent conflict and peace will also participate in one of the sessions (to be arranged).

Sample Syllabus

 

Prof. Abouharb

This course will examine how we generate systematic knowledge about why governments repress or respect the human rights of their citizens. It will examine some of the qualitative and quantitative approaches to the generation of knowledge about human rights repression. The course will then examine some of the different theoretical questions that have been systematically examined to uncover the determinants of repression and respect for human rights. 

Sample Syllabus


Psychology

Professor T. Chamorro-Premuzic
Fundamental principles of psychology, with emphasis on basic research and applications in psychology's major theoretical areas of study: thought, memory, learning, perception, personality, social processes, development, and the physiological bases of psychology. Direct observation of methods of investigation by laboratory demonstrations and by student participation in current research projects.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Students should already have taken Introduction to Psychology.

Professor J. De Fockert

Introduction to theories and research in some major areas of cognitive psychology, including human memory, attention, language production and comprehension, thinking and reasoning.

Sample Syllabus

Professor T. Chamorro-Premuzic
Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology.

Sample Syllabus

Professor T. Chamorro-Premuzic
Introduction to research in personality, including such topics as the self-concept; unconscious processes; how we relate to others; and stress, anxiety, and depression.

Sample Syllabus

Professor K. Lowenthal
The kinds, dynamics, causes, and treatment of psychopathology. Topics include early concepts of abnormal behavior; affective disorders, anxiety disorders, psychosis, and personality disorders; the nature and effectiveness of traditional and modern methods of psychotherapy; and viewpoints of major psychologists past and present.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Students should already have taken Introduction to Psychology.

Professor D. Richardson

Introduction and overview of theoretical issues and selected research in developmental psychology. Focus on infancy through adolescence. Lectures interweave theory, methods, and findings about how we develop as perceiving, thinking, and feeling beings.

Sample Syllabus


Sociology

Cross listed with IDSEM-UG 9101 (Gallatin) and HIST-UA 9452 (History)

Professor D. Feldman
To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

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Upcoming Application Deadlines

Spring Semester

Priority: September 15

Regular: October 15

Applications received after October 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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