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Courses - Fall 2012

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.

Issues in Contemporary British Politics and Culture (zero to two credits) is a required course for all students.

Please review the NYU London Registration Guidelines for important information before registering for classes.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Fall 2012 | Spring 2013 | Fall 2013

 

Required Course For All Students

Required of all students enrolled at NYU London. No grade. Pass/Fail only.

Professor C. Bloom and others
This course will introduce students to the context of life in modern Britain through a series of talks by prominent figures in British society. The main objectives of the course are to give students access to those at the top of British politics and culture; to make students aware of the unique characteristics of British culture and to examine the reasons for the far-reaching changes in British society over the last thirty or forty years. It is important for NYU undergraduates who are studying abroad to study the socio-political context of that country as part of their experience abroad. This course will begin to explore important social and political issues that Britain has handled differently than the United States. 

Sample Syllabus


Africana Studies

Professor Primorac
Deals with the history of Pan-Africanism and its impact on the modern world. Focuses on the major themes of Pan-Africanism, including those of African unity, black rebellion against colonialism and racism, black diaspora, and black culture. Also considers the relations between Pan-Africanism and such movements as nationalism, Marxism, and Afrocentricity.

Professor D. Osborne

Introduces students to the tools of cultural criticism and theory, with particular emphasis on black culture, urban environment, and black people’s relationships to a variety of social and cultural institutions and practices. The latter may include the mass media, class and poverty, the police, urban development, education, music, art, and sports. 


Africana Studies (The School of Oriental and Africana  Studies, University of London)

Read more about the SOAS Africana Studies programme here. (Please note that SOAS courses outside of this selection are not open to NYU London students, and students on the NYU London program cannot enroll directly in University of London courses.)

Professor Dabiri
The aim of the course is to introduce students to cultural dimensions in Africa, and to ways of approaching the study of culture in Africa. It focuses on three overall themes: orality, performance and identity, exploring ways in which these find expression primarily (though not exclusively) through language, religious belief, music, literature, nationalism, and popular culture. After presenting a general theoretical framework for the study of the themes, it concentrates on specific cultural contexts, illustrated with "case studies". Students are also encouraged to do further reading within other culture areas of Africa and the African Diaspora. 

Professor J. Opland
This course provides students with knowledge of the diverse literatures composed and written in indigenous languages of Africa, as well as of the general issues relevant to the study of this literature. The languages covered include Swahili (East Africa), Hausa and Yoruba (Nigeria and West Africa), Xhosa (Southern Africa), and Somali (Horn of Africa). The literature is discussed largely according to major genre types, such as poetry and song, oral narratives, and written prose literature. No knowledge of these languages is required for the course. 

Professor K.Osei-Nyame
The course familiarizes students with a selection of the varying perspectives from which African experience has been perceived, analyzed, and interpreted, primarily by Africans and persons of African descent, both on the continent and in the diaspora. 

Professor L. Marten
An introduction to thinking about the human faculty of language within a specifically African context. The course focuses on issues of language within the framework of human society at all levels, and not so much on language as a structural entity. Topics include the general characteristics of human language; the description of the languages of Africa; the question of language and cultural contact in Africa; and the contemporary issues of language and sociopolitics in Africa. 

Professor K. Osei-Nyame
The course examines not only the common concerns but also the diverse traditions, as a result of historical, social, and cultural imperatives, that have informed the literature produced by African writers. Topics include colonialism; the question of language; race and identity; nationalism and literature; modernity; exile; and the politics of gender in the African context. 


Art History

Professor Eliya Ribak

The course is designed as an introduction to museum studies through the study of London Museums. We will cover the types and definitions of museums, using key London collections, such as the British Museum and the Tate as well as smaller collections such as the Wallace Collection.
The course will introduce contemporary theories and practices in museology, examine how collections evolve, interrogate the role of individual collectors, study the specific character of the permanent and temporary exhibitions, and discuss the relationship between museums, cultures, and society. We will examine current issues in the museum profession as it faces the future of museums in the twenty-first century.

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

Professor M. Douglas-Scott
The principal aim of this course is to familiarise students with the history of British art from the Stuarts to the end of the Georgian era. Teaching will be conducted entirely on sites in London or its immediate vicinity. The course will begin with the elite patronage of the Stuart court and end with the development of public institutions of art from the mid-eighteenth century. The Social significance of portraiture, the cult of antiquity, the art market and the rise of landscape will all be studied as themes. There will be a strong emphasis on the European sources of British visual culture and the emergence of a distinctive national tradition of painting from Hogarth through to Turner.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

Professor M. Douglas-Scott
London has some of the richest collections of renaissance art in the world. Students in this course will be brought into direct contact with a large variety of artefacts to be found in museums and galleries such as the National Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Museum as well as the British Library. Works by Van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Durer and Holbein will be examined alongside those of less well-known artists. Rather than provide a standard chronological narrative of European Art History c. 1400- c. 1600, focus will be placed on subject areas such as the altarpiece and the private devotional image, the renaissance portrait, graphic practices, print culture, the materials and functions of sculpture, myth and allegory, the cabinet of curiosities, the concept of the 'Renaissance' itself. These topics will not be organised around traditional national or regional 'schools' considered in isolation from one another but instead interconnections will be explored between the development of different types, technical processes and cultural practices across the Netherlands, France, Germany and Italy. A special case will be made of the English Renaissance, in order to place it within the wider European context through additional visits to Westminster Abbey and Hampton Court. 

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History Elective credit & Urban Design credit.

Professor G. Stamp
British architecture is studied, from the Roman remains to the Post-Modern ITV Studios in London. Architecture, urban systems, preservation, and planning issues will be studied. While examining the past and present, the future of architecture will also be explored with an emphasis on the importance of renovating and refurbishing old buildings. There will be site visits in and around the City.

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only.

Professor E. Gee
London, like New York is a rich and complicated city. Unlike New York however, it has been continuously occupied for just under 2000 years. Almost every epoch of London’s history can be detected in the city’s architecture and distinctive streetscape.

This course is designed to work in three ways. Firstly it is an opportunity to learn about London’s architecture and art by physically exploring it. Secondly this class is an introduction to sketching and keeping a travel notebook, a basic and useful skill that any liberal arts student should have an experience of. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, this course teaches how to 'read' a town or city. The ability to visually make sense of European built-environment should really help in understanding the architecture of New York City and, of course, town and cities throughout the United States, and anywhere else. 

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Art History elective credit.

 Professor J. Beckett

London is the center of the British art world. This course will examine painting and sculpture of the 20th century with an emphasis on work after World War II. Recent art in Britain will be studied with trips to the museums, galleries and installations of significant new work. The format of the course will stress active visits to collections. Artists likely to be included are Henry Moore, Ben Nicholson, Lucien Freud, Francis Bacon, Anthony Caro, Richard Hamilton, David Hockney, Gilbert and George, Damien Hirst, and Rachel Whiteread. 

Sample Syllabus

Students in the NYU Art History Dept: This course counts for Architecture and Urban Design credit only

Professor B. O'Looney
Re-cycling or re-using buildings is one of the most important subjects in the built environment. It is an area in which there have been some remarkable successes in recent years both in America and in Europe: impressive and much loved public buildings have been given new life by progressive architects and developers, helping ensure that our towns and cities retain their individual character. Unlike international modern buildings, historic buildings are strong markers of the industry, aspirations, local materials and resources of a particular place. Recycling old buildings is crucial so our architectural and social history can be read in the townscape that surrounds us.

A course about recycling old buildings presents an opportunity to explore some basic themes in the built environment – architecture history, environmental issues and the rise of the conservation movement in the 19th and 20th centuries. Buildings are responsible for 50% of our carbon emissions each year, and more than half of a building’s energy footprint is expended in the relatively short spell of its construction. Re-using our redundant historic architecture for new purposes has obvious positive benefits for the planet. Equally, upgrading historic buildings in use, like our housing stock, is environmentally smarter that demolishing parts of our cities and starting again with new structures.

The locations and nature of industrial production has changed across the world. Most western cities have a surfeit of industrial spaces and buildings lying empty, often in their centres. This course will first cover the story of the development of industrial architecture from the 18th century onwards and look at how these robust, proud and often highly decorative structures can accommodate new uses. Based in London, we will have the opportunity to visit a number of key examples of re-use where we can see first-hand how industrial history, modern technology and the changing use of our city centres combine to form this essential story in contemporary urbanism.  


Biology

Prerequisite: High School Chemistry
Students registering for this course must also register for a Laboratory section & a Recitation section.

Professor V. Wells
Introductory course mainly for science majors designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics, and history and classification of life forms and evolution.

Taken in conjunction with the Principles of Biology I lecture.

Professor V. Wells 
Laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems. 

Taken in Conjunction with Lecture and Lab. 


Business

This course is only open to Stern BPE Students.

Professor Gabay
Course description coming soon.

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Analysis (also accepted: STAT-UB 1, ECON-UA 18, or ECON-UA 20), ECON-UB 1 Microeconomics (also accepted: ECON-UA 2 or ECON-UA 5), and ACCT-UB 1 Principles of Financial Accounting.

Professor D. Nitzsche
A rigorous course developing the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Basic concepts of return and risk are explored in detail with a view to understanding how financial markets work and how different kinds of financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and the utilization of these markets by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk. The course includes a segment on the use and application of computer-based quantitative technology for financial modeling purposes.

Sample Syllabus

Professor D. Bourne
Investigates the nature, functions, and responsibilities of the management of organizations. Develops an analytical approach to the identification, structuring, analysis, and solution of organizational problems. Introduces the student to organizational policies and structures, functional areas, and production processes (including resource allocation, measurement and evaluation, and control), leadership style, and organizational adaptation and evolution. Teaching methodologies include lectures, case analysis, and class discussion.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Foundations of Finance (FINC-UB 2) and Statistics or equivalents.

Professor D Edelshain
The class focuses on the nature of financial management from a number of perspectives including the national, the corporate and the individual, but particularly the corporate. You will become familiar with the financial system, including that relating to banking, though there will be little overlap with courses that deal with the functioning of financial markets. The importance of behavioural finance will also be stressed during the course. 

Prof. L. Mistelis
Every professional business person must be aware of how legal systems work and effect business decisions. Furthermore, the interaction between Law and Business is multidimensional involving international, ethical, and technological considerations. In this course, students examine how key areas of business law, including contracts, torts, and business organizations, influence the structure of domestic and international business relationships. Students actively participate in legal studies designed to enhance business skills such as analytical thinking, written communication, oral presentation, conflict resolution, and team work problem-solving. 

Professors Vince Mitchell & TBA

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and as a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels from producer to consumer and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases and projects to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: STAT-UB 103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression/Forecasting Analysis (also accepted: ECON-UA 18, ECON-UA 20, or BOTH STAT-UB 1 and STAT-UB 3)

 Professor J. Beasley

Designed to give students a better understanding of how firms can gain competitive advantage from their operations function. Typically this requires the firm to achieve, at a minimum, cost, quality and ecological parity; responsiveness and adaptability to customer needs and desires; rapid time to market; process technology leadership; and sufficient and responsive capacity. A problem-solving framework is developed that enables students to undertake managerial and technical analysis that should result in the desired competitive advantage. Both service and manufacturing case examples are utilized.

Sample Syllabus


Chemistry

Prerequisite: CHEM-UA 102 College Chemistry II or its equivalent.

Students registering for this course must also register for the Laboratory & Recitation sections

Professor D. Urch
An introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds, the course is presented in the functional group framework incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, and spectroscopy (IR, NMR, UV/visible, and mass spectroscopy). 

Taken in conjuction with Organic Chemistry I Lecture

Professor D. Urch
Provides training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, including crystallization, distillation, extraction, and other separation techniques such as column chromatography and gas chromatography. Experiments involving the synthesis of organic compounds are introduced as well as those performing qualitative organic analysis. 

Taken in conjunction with Organic Chemistry I Lecture and Lab.

Prof. D. Urch


Cinema Studies

Students registering for this class must also register for the Screenings section.

This course carries an additional fee of £20 to cover the cost of course materials.

Prof. P. Drummond
This course provides an exciting and challenging introduction to British Cinema, studying the rich and varied relationships between the society and its films. It is organised in four main parts, offering an Introduction to Film Studies; a look at National Identity and the Cinema in relation to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the UK as a whole; case studies in key authors Mike Leigh and Ken Loach; and approaches to narrative and genre.

Students registering for this class must also register for the Lecture section. 


Creative Writing

Professor E. Sweeney
Beginning workshop in creative writing designed to explore and refine the student's individual writing interests. This course may include fiction and/or poetry and creative non-fiction. 


Dramatic Literature

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of £280 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

Professor N. Jones
This course, designed to introduce students to the range of 20th-century drama staged in the contemporary London theater scene, presents a wide variety of British, American, and multicultural works currently playing. Students analyze the history of the modern theatre in London. Emphasis is placed on comparative interpretation of texts and the dramatic performances of works. 

Students registering for this course must also register for a Lecture section.

Professor N. Jones
Both lecture sections take theatre visits together. 

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of £130 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

Professor Mick Hattaway
This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors' companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet. 

Students registering for this class must also register for the Lecture section. 


Economics

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisite: ECON-UA 9001, Economic Principles and ECON-UA 9002, Economic Principles II

Professors J. Olmo & J. Saraswati
This course focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department’s more advanced course in V31.0324. The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisite: ECON-UA 9001, Economic Principles or ECON-UA 9005, Introduction to Economic Analysis

Professor S. Hannah
The principal characteristics of the financial system and its current challenges; derivatives, financial innovation and the banking industry; money supply and monetary policy; bonds, equities and interest rates; financial supervision and regulation; pricing of financial securities and balanced portfolios; foreign exchange and how currency markets impact policy and asset choices; international policy co-ordination; banking crises and reform programmes.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 1, ECON-UA 2, and MATH-UA 121.

Professor Hannah
Study of aggregate economic analysis with special attention paid to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation. Critically examines both the theories and the policies associated with them.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 2 and MATH-UA 121 (Calculus I). (Not open to NYU Stern students.)

Professor Verry
Examines the manner in which producers, consumers, and resource owners acting through the market determine the prices and output of goods, the allocation of productive resources, and the functional distribution of incomes. The price system is seen as a network of interrelated decisions, with the market process serving to communicate information to decision makers.

Sample Syllabus


English

Professor C. Bloom
On Christmas Day, 1764 Horace Walpole published The Castle of Otranto, the very first Gothic novel. The Gothic flourished especially in the nineteenth century, creating a whole vocabulary of new creatures and landscapes and two of the great books of the genre: Frankenstein And Dracula. This course concentrates on the great works of Gothic which are central to an understanding of literature, film, early Romanticism and popular culture. Specialising on the works of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we will also explore how those texts were reinvented for film and what new elements were added in the twentieth century. Using a selection of texts and using a variety of approaches from the historical to the post modern and the feminist to queer theory we will explore the multifarious levels of meaning in Gothic texts as well as looking at narrative strategies and a variety of themes including the political and revolutionary, the erotic and the exotic, the Promethian and the undead, the role of religion, the role of women, the Wandering Jew and the 'mock' medieval. 

Professor Leya Landau
This course will study a variety of texts written at particular times in the history of London. The aims of the course are to encourage student to think historically, in terms of the way London and representations of the city have changed and developed over time; and theoretically, in terms of the way the city is mediated through different forms and genres (e.g. poetry, novels, essays, film). We will also examine the texts in relation to issues such as gender, the definition of the modern metropolis as a labyrinthine city of Babylon, the influence of metropolitan culture on Modernism and Modernity, assimilation versus multiculturalism, immigration, and the effects of new modern spaces on individuals. 

Students registering for this course must also register for the theatre visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of £280 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

Professor Nesta Jones
This course, designed to introduce students to the range of 20th-century drama staged in the contemporary London theater scene, presents a wide variety of British, American, and multicultural works currently playing. Students analyze the history of the modern theatre in London. Emphasis is placed on comparative interpretation of texts and the dramatic performances of works. 

Students registering for this course must also register for a Lecture section.

Professor N. Jones
Both lecture sections take theatre visits together. 

Professor M. Ferguson
This course will examine the major British novels of the 19th Century in the context of their setting in London and British culture. The course will include visits to London sites presented in the works that will be read. Readings include such major novelists as Dickens, Thackeray, Wilde, Woolf, and others. 

Students registering for this class must also register for the Theatre Visits section.

This course carries an additional fee of £130 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.

Professor Mick Hattaway
This course provides an introduction to the dramatic work of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Students read and attend representative comedies, tragedies, and histories, their selection to be determined by the plays actually in production in and around London, particularly at the Barbican, New Globe, and Stratford to which at least one excursion will be made. Special attention will be given to the playhouses and the influence they had on the art of the theatre, actors' companies, and modes of production and performance. Lectures and discussions will focus on the aesthetic quality of the plays, their relationship with the audiences (then and now), the application of the diverse attitudes and assumptions of modern critical theory to the Elizabethan stage, the contrasting structures of Shakespearean and non-Shakespearean drama, the new emphasis on selfhood and individuality, and the major themes of hierarchy, order, and justice, the conflict of Nature and Fortune, the role of Providence, the ideals of love, and the norms of social accord. Opportunities will be given to investigate the interrelations of the plays and other arts, including film, opera, and ballet. 

Students registering for this class must also register for the Lecture section. 

Professor Mick Hattaway

Most of these major texts from the canon of English literature have been selected because they open out onto life in London at the time they were written. We shall be concerned not only with topics of place and setting, but also with issues of individual and national identity, as well as with forms of verse, drama, and fictional narratives. We shall be seeing a performance of Marlowe’s Dr Faustus at Shakespeare’s Globe, witnessing justice in action in a London court, as well as visiting the houses of Dr Johnson and Charles Dickens, Tate Britain, and viewing screen versions of a couple of our chosen novels. Texts will be studied in chronological order; the course is weighted towards literature of the last 100 years. The Oxford Book of English Verse will help give us a sense of continuity and change.

Sample Syllabus


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Professor D. Feldman
To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus


History

Professor Denis Judd
A history of Modern Imperialism from the beginning of the nineteenth century to post-Second World War decolonisation: with particular reference to the British Empire.

Sample Syllabus

Professor Steve Inwood
The course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London's changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world has ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size. Each week (unless there is a field trip) there will be a lecture and a discussion in which you will be able to present ideas and information gathered from lectures and from your weekly reading. There will also be four walking tours of parts of London which relate to the period we are studying at a particular time. 

Sample Syllabus

Professor Andrew Crozier
Covers the impact of World War II, the postwar division of Europe, the onset of the cold war, the economic recovery and transformation of Western Europe, Stalinism in Eastern Europe, the 1960s and events of 1968, the origins and development of the European community, and the cultural and intellectual life of European nations in this period. Ends with a discussion of the Eastern European revolutions of 1989 and their significance, together with the reunification of Germany, for the future of the continent. 

Sample Syllabus

Professor Konrad Hirschler
An introductory course dealing with the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the origins of Islam; the beliefs and practices of the Islamic community; differences between Sunni and Shiite Islam; Sufism; the spiritual, intellectual, and artistic life of the Islamic commonwealth; and modern Islamic revival. 

Professor Philip Woods
This course examines the place that slavery played in Britain's past and its legacy today. In the eighteenth century, Britain prided itself on the liberty enjoyed by its people, yet it was the largest participant in the Atlantic slave trade, and grew rich on the wealth created by ports such as London, Bristol and Liverpool. In the same period some 15,000 black people lived in English ports and their presence has only recently been properly acknowledged. In the nineteenth century, however, Britain perceived itself as in the forefront of the global battle to end the slave trade and slavery itself. This pioneering campaign contributed to a more positive sense of British national identity. Yet Britain continued to depend on the importation of slave-grown produce and even began to ship hundreds of thousands of Indians as virtual slaves to many parts of the world. The ambivalent legacy of Britain’s past involvement with slavery remains important to Britain's multi-cultural identity and its global role today. 

Sample Syllabus

Professor David Feldman
To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

Professor Hagai Segal

A survey of Europe from 1789 to the present. Investigates the political, social, economic, and cultural developments that shaped and continue to shape the modern age. Emphasis is on the evolution of the nation-state, on industrialization and its impact on society and politics, and on the intellectual responses to the rapid changes these developments inspired. Topics include Europe and the French Revolution; the rise of the nation-state, 1848-1914; and the impact of totalitarian ideologies on 20th-century Europe.

Sample Syllabus


Internship for Credit

Note: Students accepted to this course must indicate on their visa survey that they want a Tier-4 General Student Visa; you will not be permitted to intern (paid or unpaid) in the UK without a Tier-4 visa. A Tier-4 visa costs a minimum of £289 GBP (approximately $500 USD), plus any applicable shipping and expedite fees. (*Does not apply to students traveling on EEA or Swiss passports.)

This 4 credit course includes a weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/week at an approved internship fieldsite. Internship placements are made by EUSA, an organization partnering with NYU London. EUSA provides internship placements in a wide range of organizations. Industry sectors include:

  • Business, Finance & Economics
  • Healthcare, Social Issues & Education
  • Television, Film & Journalism
  • Communications
  • Arts & Culture
  • Politics & NGOs

The seminar portion of the course explores many different aspects of your internship site. The goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of the company or organization, including its approach, its policies, and the context in which it operates. We will also discuss more generally the state of the contemporary workplace and ourselves as workers. Finally, you will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on the internship experience and as a way to refine your own personal and professional goals.



Journalism & Mass Communication

This course is accompanied by a theatre visit, code JOUR-UA 9202-14246

This course carries an additional fee of £160 to cover the cost of theatre tickets.Students should also be prepared to pay up to £150 for extra tickets while in London as part of the Methods & Practice course.

Professor Matt Wolf
Using the cultural life of London as its focus, this course aims to enable students to report on the diversity of cultural and artistic activity in the British capital across the specturm, starting with the theatre as befits the instructor, who is a noted drama critic and arts journalist for The International Herald Tribune (www.nytimes.com/theater), among many other publications. Various forms and techniques will be explored through lecture, discussion and assignments, including: news reports, interviews, reviews (film, dance, theatre, classical music, opera, pop and rock), feature stories, blogs, etc. During the course, students will learn not only about London's cultural landscape but will be encouraged consider various journalistic literary forms. Weekly visitis to theatre and other live performances are a key component of this course, and possible specific events on offer will be notes as the time gets nearer

Students in this course must also register for the Methods and Practice: Reporting the Arts Lecture. 

Professor T. Fenton
Designed to interrogate the impact of various forms of media on "society" and various notions of society on "media." Students consider conventional and unconventional media in Britain—from the London Times to movies to fashion magazines—in an effort to interpret British culture. The key question is not "Is this text 'good'?" but "What does this text mean?" 


Mathematics

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in V63.0121 Calculus I or the equivalent.

 

Professor A. Bijura
Systems of linear equations. Gaussian elimination, matrices, determinants, and Cramer’s rule. Vectors, vector spaces, basis and dimension, linear transformations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, quadratic forms. 

Professor D. Larman
An introduction to the mathematical treatment of random phenomena occurring in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Axioms of mathematical probability, combinatorial analysis, binomial distribution, Poisson and normal approximation, random variables and probability distributions, generating functions, Markov chains applications. 


Media, Culture, & Communication

Professor D. Thussu
A review of theories and evidence of cultural and political transformations in culture underway in the era of media proliferation, multinational conglomerates, and cyberspace. The role of international flows and national differences.


Metropolitan Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

Professor Y. Evans
An urban centre for nearly two millennia, London has both shaped and been shaped by processes stretching over ever widening geographical scales, to claim its place within a select network of cities that are said to command contemporary globalisation. This course explores London’s evolving global reach, examining its role in key economic, social, political, cultural and spatial processes and identifying the effects that these have in turn had in its own urban life and landscape. The course briefly documents London’s establishment as an outpost of the Roman Empire in early history to its rise as the politico-administrative heart of the British Empire, to focus on London’s emergence as a global city. Largely oriented by the work of Human Geography scholars, the course examines the unravelling of London’s global connections through concepts such as urban space and place, globalisation, spatial division of labour, networks and flows, migration, transnationalism and multiculturalism.

The course is based on a mix of lectures and student-led seminars, and also includes a guided city walk and a museum visit. Lectures by the course convenor address the key themes of the weekly programme. Students are required to read designated texts for the week ahead. In seminars, students present and discuss their findings from different learning activities (readings, field walk, museum visit, their personal experience of London, lectures). Students are expected to participate actively in learning activities, especially seminars, and their participation constitutes one assessment component. 

Sample Syllabus


Middle Eastern Studies

Professor Hirschler
An introductory course dealing with the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the origins of Islam; the beliefs and practices of the Islamic community; differences between Sunni and Shiite Islam; Sufism; the spiritual, intellectual, and artistic life of the Islamic commonwealth; and modern Islamic revival. 

Professor H. Segal
Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties. 


Philosophy

Professor Peter Cave

This is an introduction to some central questions, perplexities and concepts within the main areas of philosophy, introducing themes from metaphysics, epistemology and ethics. Some extracts from some classic texts will be engaged – Plato, Descartes and John Stuart Mill, for example – and contemporary approaches will be addressed. Questions include: What am I? Is free will an illusion? What is knowledge? Is belief in God rational? and Whom ought I to save? In discussing these questions, important distinctions will be introduced and there will be attention to rigorous argument, including the nature of deductively sound argument.

The classes will involve informal instruction and discussion, with a focus upon clarity and argument over a range of topics, though also, it is hoped, with a lightness of touch.

Sample Syllabus

Professor Anthony Price
Examines fundamental questions of moral philosophy. What are our most basic values and which of them are specifically moral values? What are the ethical principles, if any, by which we should judge our actions, ourselves, and our lives?

Sample Syllabus


Physics

Students registering for this course must also register for the Laboratory and Recitation Sections. Students should note that the Physics lab takes place at King's College in Waterloo. This is roughly a 30 minute bus journey from the academic centre.

Professor K. Whitehead
This course begins a two-semester introduction to physics (lecture and laboratory-recitation) intended primarily for preprofessional students and for those majoring in a science other than physics. Topics include kinematics and dynamics of particles; momentum, work, and energy; gravitation; circular, angular, and harmonic motion; mechanical and thermal properties of solids, liquids, and gases; heat and thermodynamics. 

Students should note that the Physics lab takes place at King's College in Waterloo. This is roughly a 30 minute bus journey from the academic centre.

Professor G. Wilson
Taken in Conjunction with the General Physics I lecture and recitation. 

Professor S. Zochowksi
Taken in Conjunction with the General Physics I Lecture and Lab. 


Politics

Professor S. Kelly
Introduction to the politics and society of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Traces the political and social development of the historic countries of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales; the growth of British hegemony and imperialism; the politics of decline and decay; and the promise of rebirth. Studies contemporary political institutions and processes that have undergone massive transformation over the past 50 years. Examines the continuing conflict and terrorism in Northern Ireland and dynamics of change in the Thatcher era and beyond. 

Professor A. Fagan
Introduction to the politics of Eastern and Central European countries. Considers political, social, and economic developments in these countries during the post-Versailles period. Subjects include the communist takeover at the end of World War II, uprising during the de-Stalinization era, and the collapse of communism at the end of the 1980s. Also deals with contemporary issues, including the process of democratization. 

Professor H. Segal
Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems - using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis - including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimation of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties. 

Professor E. Thielemann
This course critically investigates European integration, the operation of the EU as a political system and European policies. The course explores the origins, development, institutions, major policies, policy-making, current problems and matters of controversy of the European Community / Union. The major approaches applied to explain integration as well as the complex operation of the EU as a political system are described and discussed. The political and economic logic behind different national perspectives on European integration are examined. 

Prof. Newman
Characteristics and conditions of war and peace and the transition from one to the other from the perspective of political and social science. Examines the role and use of coercion in global affairs, with emphasis on attempts to substitute negotiation, bargaining, market forces, politics, and law for the resort to massive violence in moderating disputes. Considers recent developments in both the theory and practice of peace building demonstrating the differing ways in which particular conflicts tend to be viewed by participants, external commentators and policy-makers.  Students will also undertake their own research on a case study of conflict.

The course will be taught in the form of an informal lecture and a class discussion, and students will present preliminary versions of their case studies to the class. A visiting speaker from an organisation dealing with issues of violent conflict and peace will also participate in one of the sessions (to be arranged).


Psychology

Professor Yulia Kovas

Introduces and examines the core topics of research in Psychology. What is psychology? What are the methods used to study human behavior? What factors influence human behaviour? How do genetic and environmental factors influence human behaviour? Does human behaviour change in social situations? Can human thinking and behavior be empirically examined and predicted? What are the underlying neural substrates of thought and behaviour?

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

Professor Jan De Fockert
Introduction to theories and research in some major areas of cognitive psychology, including human memory, attention, language production and comprehension, thinking and reasoning. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

Professor Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic
Introduction to research in personality, including such topics as the self-concept; unconscious processes; how we relate to others; and stress, anxiety, and depression. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

Professor T. Chamorro-Premuzic
Introduction to theories and research about the social behavior of individuals, such as perception of others and the self, attraction, affiliation, altruism and helping, aggression, moral thought and action, attitudes, influence, conformity, social exchange and bargaining, group decision making, leadership and power, and environmental psychology. 

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

Professor Kate Lowenthal
The kinds, dynamics, causes, and treatment of psychopathology. Topics include early concepts of abnormal behavior; affective disorders, anxiety disorders, psychosis, and personality disorders; the nature and effectiveness of traditional and modern methods of psychotherapy; and viewpoints of major psychologists past and present. 

Sample Syllabus


Religious Studies

Professor Hirschler
An introductory course dealing with the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the origins of Islam; the beliefs and practices of the Islamic community; differences between Sunni and Shiite Islam; Sufism; the spiritual, intellectual, and artistic life of the Islamic commonwealth; and modern Islamic revival. 


Sociology

Professor D. Feldman
To provide an understanding of the main immigration trends in Britain, France and Germany since 1850 To provide an understanding of the problems attending the social and political integration of immigrants in contemporary Western Europe To compare the experience and understanding of immigration in Europe with the experience and understanding of immigration in the United States To examine the ways in which the memory of immigration is represented in literature and contemporary culture.

Sample Syllabus

Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester

Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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