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Fall Courses

Please note that the syllabi available here are subject to change. Please contact the class instructor for confirmation of the final course content.

All freshman are required to take a minimum of 16 credits (4 classes) per semester


Courses for Fall Semester



LSP Courses

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Prof D. Margolies, Prof C. Bloom & Dr E. Ribak

Syllabus:

This course introduces the concept of the self from antiquity through the Middle Ages and focuses on how individuals and social relations are portrayed in literature, in the visual and performing arts, and through music. Ideas and images of the self are examined within the context of their origins in the classical, Judaic, Christian, and Near Eastern traditions, and their development is followed through the multiple discourses and traditions that converge in the Middle Ages. Conceptions of the divine and heroic, power and disenfranchisement, beauty and love are examined. Course work may include the Homeric epics, the Bible, the Egyptian necropolis, Greek and Roman drama, Socratic dialogues, classical and medieval sculpture and architecture, Byzantine icons and murals, illuminated manuscripts, Gregorian chants, troubadour love poetry and medieval romance, the Gothic cathedral, and the Islamic mosque.

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Mr H. Segal, Dr. C. Noel & Dr. M. Milofsky

Syllabus:

This course introduces the primary questions of philosophic, religious, political, social, and historical discourse. The texts raise the enduring questions of the relationships among the individual person, the environment, the community, the polity, and the divine. Special attention is paid in this course to the development of analytical techniques and the language of critical discussion. Texts are chosen from among the major writers of antiquity and the Middle Ages, such as Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, Cicero, Seneca, St. Augustine, Einhard, and St. Thomas Aquinas, and from historical texts like the Koran and the Bible.

 

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Ms E. Sweeney, Dr. M Mauger, Dr. R. Coulton & Ms E.Grubin

Syllabus:

Writing I has two main objectives: first, to develop the students’ self-confidence and fluency by engaging them in the use of writing to express, explore, and develop ideas through a variety of forms, including informal writing (free writing, journal writing, etc.); second, to engage them in practicing the same kinds of critical and analytical skills they will use throughout their two years in LSP’s writing intensive program. The class is conducted as a workshop. Students produce a wide range of writing, both in and out of class, which forms the basis for classroom activities. All papers go through multiple drafts, often with input from peers as well as the instructor.


Economics

Credits: 4

Professor(s) Mr John Mark & Dr David Shepherd

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus V63.0009

Focuses on the economy as a whole (the “macroeconomy”). Begins with the meaning and measurement of important data (on unemployment, inflation, and production), then turns to the behavior of the overall economy. Topics include long-run economic growth and the standard of living; the causes and consequences of economic booms and recessions; the banking system and the Federal Reserve; the stock and bond markets; international exchange rates and the impact of global economic events; and the role of government policy.  Conducted in English.

Please note that Economics requires a prerequisite of Pre-Calculus for both Economics I and Economics II. To meet the pre-requisite you must have completed a pre-calculus class or its equivalent.This includes an Algebra and/or Calculus class, described as follows: “An intensive course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs.”  If you have not completed such a class, you may struggle in your Economics class.

 

Credits: 4

Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus

Professor(s): Dr. Y. Georgellis & Prof. N. Hashimzade

Syllabus:

Focuses on individual economic decision makers—households, business firms, and government agencies—and how they are linked together. The emphasis is on decision making by households and firms and how these decisions shape our economic life. Explores the different environments in which businesses sell their products, hire workers, and raise funds to expand their operations; the economic effects of various government policies, such as minimum wage legislation, rent controls, antitrust laws, and more.

Please note that Economics requires a prerequisite of Pre-Calculus for both Economics I and Economics II. To meet the pre-requisite you must have completed a pre-calculus class or its equivalent.This includes an Algebra and/or Calculus class, described as follows: “An intensive course in intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Topics include algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs.” If you have not completed such a class, you may struggle in your Economics class.


History

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Mr. H. Segal

Syllabus:

A survey of Europe from 1789 to the present. Investigates the political, social, economic, and cultural developments that shaped and continue to shape the modern age. Emphasis is on the evolution of the nation-state, on industrialization and its impact on society and politics, and on the intellectual responses to the rapid changes these developments inspired. Topics include Europe and the French Revolution; the rise of the nation-state, 1848-1914; and the impact of totalitarian ideologies on 20th-century Europe.

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Dr S. Inwood

Syllabus:

This course examines the growth and importance of London from the Roman invasion of 43 AD to the present day. Students will learn about London’s changing economic and political role, and will understand how London grew to dominate the commerce, industry and culture of England. They will find out how London became the biggest city the world had ever known, and how it coped (or failed to cope) with the social and environmental problems created by its enormous size.

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Dr K. Hirschler

Syllabus:

An introductory course dealing with the life of the Prophet Muhammad and the origins of Islam; the beliefs and practices of the Islamic community; differences between Sunni and Shiite Islam; Sufism; the spiritual, intellectual, and artistic life of the Islamic commonwealth; and modern Islamic revival.


Philosophy

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Mr Peter Cave

Syllabus:

An engaging introduction to some of the most central problems in philosophy and various arguments relating to them. Topics will include free will and moral responsibility, the existence of God, knowledge and skepticism, and the mind-body problem. Readings will be drawn from both classical and contemporary sources.

 


Psychology

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Dr Y. Kovas

Syllabus:

Fundamental principles of psychology, with emphasis on basic research and applications in psychology's major theoretical areas of study: thought, memory, learning, perception, personality, social processes, development, and the physiological bases of psychology. Direct observation of methods of investigation by laboratory demonstrations and by student participation in current research projects.


Sociology

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Mr H. Segal, Dr. C. Noel & Dr M. Milofsky

Syllabus:

This course introduces the primary questions of philosophic, religious, political, social, and historical discourse. The texts raise the enduring questions of the relationships among the individual person, the environment, the community, the polity, and the divine. Special attention is paid in this course to the development of analytical techniques and the language of critical discussion. Texts are chosen from among the major writers of antiquity and the Middle Ages, such as Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, Cicero, Seneca, St. Augustine, Einhard, and St. Thomas Aquinas, and from historical texts like the Koran and the Bible.


English

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Prof. M. Hattaway

Syllabus:

Major writers of 19th to 20th centuries, including the romantic poetry of Keats and Shelley, the industrialized British empire celebrated and criticized in the works of Victorian writers like Dickens and Tennyson, to the modernist writers Eliot, Yeats, and Joyce, Woolf, and contemporary writers.


Biology

Credits: 4

Professor(s) Dr V. Wells

Syllabus:

Introductory course mainly for science majors designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles and processes of biological systems. Subjects include the basics of chemistry pertinent to biology, biochemistry and cell biology, genetics and molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, neurobiology, ecology, population genetics, and history and classification of life forms and evolution.

Students registering for this course must also register for Principles of Biology Laboratory (V23.9011.002) and Principles of Biology Recitation (V23.9011.005).

Credits: 0

Professor(s): Dr. V. Wells

Syllabus:

Taken in conjunction with the Principles of Biology I lecture, laboratory exercises illustrate the basics of experimental biology, molecular biology, and biochemistry as well as the diversity of life forms and organ systems.



Writing

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Ms.E. Sweeney, Dr. M.Mauger, Dr. R. Coulton & Ms E.grubin

Syllabus:

Writing I has two main objectives: first to develop the students' self-confidence and fluency by engaging them in the use of writing to express, explore and develop ideas through a variety of forms, including informal writing (free writing, journal writing etc); second, to engage them in practising the same kinds of critical and analytical skills they will use throughout their two years in LSP's writing intensive program. The class in conducted as a workshop. Students produce a wide range of writing, both in and out of class, which forms the basis for classroom activities. All papers go through multiple drafts, often with input from peers as well as the instructor

Writing I has two main objectives: first, to develop the students’ self-confidence and fluency by engaging them in the use of writing to express, explore, and develop ideas through a variety of forms, including informal writing (free writing, journal writing, etc.); second, to engage them in practicing the same kinds of critical and analytical skills they will use throughout their two years in GSP’s writing intensive program. The class is conducted as a workshop. Students produce a wide range of writing, both in and out of class, which forms the basis for classroom activities. All papers go through multiple drafts, often with input from peers as well as the instructor.


Cinema

Credits: 4

Professor(s): Mr P. Drummond

Syllabus:

This course provides an exciting and challenging introduction to British Cinema, studying the rich and varied relationships between the society and its films. It is organised in four main parts, offering and Introduction to Film Studies; a look at National Identity and the Cinema in relation to England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the UK as a whole; case studies in key authors Mike Leigh and Ken Loach; and approaches to narrative and genre.

This course is accompanied by a film screening, code H36.0012.002


Sociology

Credits: 2

Professor(s): Professor C.Bloom

Syllabus:

This course is optional for freshman, required for all other students at NYU in London. Pass/Fail only course.

This course will introduce students to the context of life in modern Britain through a series of talks by prominent figures in British society. The main objectives of the course are the give students access to those at the top of British politics and culture; to make students aware of the unique characteristics of British culture and to examine the reasons for the far-reaching changes in British society over the last thirty of forty years. It is important for NYU undergraduates who are studying abroad to study the socio-political context of that country as part of their experience abroad. This course will begin to explore important social and political issues that Britain has handled differently than the United States.

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester

Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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