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Courses - Spring 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Spring 2014 courses are now availble in Albert, NYU's Student Information System. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs during registration week.
  • Enrollment in an Italian Language course is required; select one that matches your skill level. If you cannot find a section that works with your schedule, contact florence.academicsupport@nyu.edu
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass/fail
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • Certain Art History, Economics, Business, and Psychology courses have prerequisites, visiting students email global.academics@nyu.edu for permission.
  • Required 30 minutes between class means a required 30 minutes between classes.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

Spring 2014| Fall 2014 |Spring 2015
 

Required Course For All Students

This course provides students with a shared study-away experience at NYU Florence, engages them in the intellectual life of our site, and prepares them for their course work by giving them a basic foundation in the history and culture of Italy. Students also benefit from basic instruction in Italian language; this instruction is designed to supplement their formal language courses and to enable them to function in their new surroundings.

 


Italian Language

All students are required to take an Italian language course for graded credit. (This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail). 

Students will gain understanding of the basic messages in simple oral and written
communication. They will be able to acquire key information from listening and reading brief, simple, authentic material and have a fair understanding of the meaning of short standard Italian conversation in a limited number of content areas. Students will be able to engage in basic conversation
as well as to initiate communication on familiar topics. Strong emphasis will be given to communicative
situations involving first and second person forms; writing activities with pertinent vocabulary
and structure will include simple autobiographical information, brief messages, simple forms and lists. Linguistic structures : subject pronouns, articles, adjectives, prepositions, present and present perfect indicative.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Elem I

Students will gain understanding of oral and written material on a variety of topics, ranging from personal routine to include family, taste and hobbies. Their understanding will include present and past events. Students will be able to engage in conversations on a variety of real-life situations regarding familiar subjects, to respond to open-ended questions and initiate communication on these topics. They will be able to give and follow directions, instructions and commands. Skills in mono-directional oral presentation will begin to emerge. Writing activities will include narration of present and past events, personal experiences, school and work situations, as well as brief messages to family and friends. Linguistic structures: subject and object pronouns, articles, adjectives, present indicative and imperative, the two main past tenses in use in contemporary Italian.

This daily course immerses students in the Italian language. The basic structures and vocabulary of the Italian language are presented. Students are also provided with systematic practice of oral Italian through dialogues, pattern drills, and exercises. Special emphasis is given to correct pronunciation, sound placement, and intonation. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Elem I & II or Intensive Elementary Italian

Students will gain understanding of oral and written communication on various topics in the past, present and future in addition to expressions of personal wishes, feelings and hopes.
Students will recognize key information in the reading and listening of authentic material and will understand, to some extent advanced texts featuring narration and description of events.
Students will be able to handle most conversation tasks and standard social situations. Students will be able to write short letters and short paragraphs and show command of simple sentence syntax. Linguistic structures: students will be familiar with increasingly complex grammatical content, such as indirect and combined pronouns, future tense, conditional and subjunctive modes.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Extensive Interm I

Students will gain understanding of oral and written material ranging from general routine and leisure time activities, to more complex topics such as politics, environmental issues, and work environment. Students will be able to read and appreciate pertinent authentic texts. Students will be able to handle most uncomplicated conversation tasks and standard social situations. Students will be able to debate and argue for opposite viewpoints on a range of topics, to make comparisons and hypothesis. Presentation skills, written and oral, will solidify; skills in narrating in paragraphs begin to emerge and develop in a creative direction. Linguistic structures: students will gain knowledge of increasingly complex verbal forms such as all tenses of the subjunctive mode, past conditional and preterit, as well as several elaborate grammatical structures.

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 1 & ITAL-UA 2, Elementary Italian I & II; or ITAL-UA 10, Intensive Elementary Italian

This course offers students who are at the intermediate level a daily immersion class. The acquisition and practice of more sophisticated structures of Italian are undertaken. Fundamental oral and written skills are developed, and vocabulary enrichment and conversational ability are emphasized. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 11, ITAL-UA 12, Intermediate Italian I & II; or ITAL-UA 20, Intensive Intermediate Italian

Intensive review of Italian grammar through written and oral exercises, conversations, compositions, translation, and readings from contemporary Italian literature. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 30, Advanced Review of Modern Italian

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in speaking present-day Italian. Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students develop vocabulary in a variety of topics, improve pronunciation, and learn an extensive range of idiomatic expressions. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus 

Co-Requisite: Conversations in Italian - ITAL-UA 9101

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in writing present-day Italian. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus 


Art and Arts Professions

Basic materials & methods of drawing. It combines perceptual learning with initial conceptual basics for drawing. This includes line usage, shape inventing, size differentiating, brightness contrast, location &
overlap. Students will develop the skill to discuss their drawings as well as the drawings of others, & learn to observe & empathize with the genres of landscape, still-life, & figure. Individual & group critiques, slide lectures, & museum & gallery visits support studio activities.

Sample Syllabus Coming Soon


Art History

NOTE: Art History courses meet in the center of Florence; students should allow for 30 minutes commute time between Art History classes and their prior/subsequent classes.

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

NYU Students who have already taken ARTH-UA 2 will not receive major credit for ARTH-UA 5 [Renaissance Art survey] or ARTH-UA 6 [Modern Art survey].

The city of Florence will be the classroom as students study the masters, explore museums, examine texts, and analyze the historical significance of monuments. With eyes cast simultaneously on painting, the graphic arts, sculpture, and architecture, this class will explore a broad range of art patronage that included religious and civic bodies, princely courts, and a growing number of private clients. The course will focus on points of intersection, transition, and the transformations that lead from one tradition to the next. Above all, our approach will encourage critical thinking and a search for unifying connections in studying the underlying logic of image making. Works will be examined on their native terms: both as physical objects, with sensitivity to their particular function and intended reception, and as visual images active within larger contexts. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: ARTH-UA 2 (History of Western Art II) or Art History AP score of 5.

When speaking of great contemporary patrons of the arts, we often hear someone called “a modern Medici.” What exactly does this phrase mean and how did the family name of the principal banking house of Renaissance Florence become synonymous with the sponsorship of cultural endeavors? This course attempts to answer these questions and others by examining the development of Medici patronage from the emergence of the family as a political force at the dawn of the Renaissance to the establishment of the grand ducal dynasty that reigned for almost two centuries in Florence. The commissions of Cosimo the Elder, Piero the Gouty, Lorenzo the Magnificent, the two Medici Popes (Leo X and Clement VII) and the first three Medic Grand Dukes (Cosimo I, Francesco I and Ferdinando I) are given particular emphasis. Issues such as familial pietas, the power and influence of Medici women and the varying political climate in Florence and Rome are also considered as fundamental to the development of characteristically Medicean patterns of patronage.

The role of the patron in determining the ultimate appearance of works of art and architecture is given primary consideration here. The Medici are therefore considered as a test case for understanding the importance of patronage for the history of Renaissance art. This may be best examined through the Medici’s continued patronage of certain artists over extended periods of time. The works of artists such as Brunelleschi, Michelozzo, Donatello, Fra Angelico, Michelangelo, Bandinelli, Vasari and Buontalenti, all of whom produced significant numbers of works under the aegis of the Medici, are therefore the main focus of the lectures, class discussions and site visits. Comparison of Medici modes of patronage with local would-be rivals or imitators and with great foreign patrons will help to provide a measure of what is both characteristic of all Renaissance patrons and what is unique to the Medici themselves.

Sample Syllabus

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class

Students in the Art History Dept: This course counts for Urban Design credit and Art History elective credit.

The city of Florence has long been admired for its combination of buildings and gardens. This course emphasizes the art of garden and landscape design, with tours to sites around the city and the surrounding areas. The starting point of the course is the 57 acres of historically significant landscape surrounding NYU's Villa La Pietra, with Renaissance-style gardens, rolling hills, and olive groves, all located within the city limits of Florence. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: ARTH-UA 2, History of Western Art II, ARTH-UA 19, History of Architecture, ARTH-UA 301, European Architecture, or permission of the instructor

The new style in architecture, sparked by the buildings of Brunelleschi and the designs and writings of L.B. Alberti, developed in 15th-century Florence against the background of a vigorously evolving humanist culture. A study of the new movement through the great qattrocento masters and the work of the giants of the 16th century (e.g., Bramante, Michelangelo, Palladio) and the spread of Renaissance style into other countries. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

This course provides students with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilization of ancient Italy from 1000 B.C. to 200 A.D. The lectures will examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning and the minor arts of the period. The course will include local field trips to important sites and exhibits. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 


Business

An introduction to the area of financial accounting. Encompasses accounting concepts from the point of view of the corporate investor and business management. Accounting procedures are discussed to facilitate the comprehension of the recording, summarizing, and reporting of business transactions. The basic principles of asset valuation and revenue and cost recognition are presented. Various asset, liability, and capital accounts are studied in detail with emphasis on an analytical and interpretive approach. The area of financial accounting is further analyzed through a discussion of the concepts and underlying financial statement analysis and the exposition of funds flow. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Evaluates, from the management point of view, marketing as a system for the satisfaction of human wants and as a catalyst of business activity. Deals with the subject at all levels from producer to consumer and emphasizes the planning required for the efficient use of marketing tools in the development and expansion of markets. Concentrates on the principles, functions, and tools of marketing, including quantitative methods. Utilizes cases and projects to develop a problem-solving ability in dealing with specific areas.

Sample Syllabus 


Cinema Studies

Co-requisite: Enrollment in a screening time.

This course covers Italian film from the beginnings of the neo-realist movement to 1960, concentrating both on the aesthetic, theoretical development of neorealism and on its political, economic, social, and cultural context. Directors studied in detail include Rossellini, Visconti, de Sica, and Antonioni. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus


Classics

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

This course provides students with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilization of ancient Italy from 1000 B.C. to 200 A.D. The lectures will examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning and the minor arts of the period. The course will include local field trips to important sites and exhibits. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 


Comparative Literature

Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist writers in both Britain and the United States were fascinated by Italy. The "Italy and Italians" of the title refers not only to images and characters in the works of the British and American authors we will be reading but also to their affinities with Italian literature. Recurring themes in the course will be history and its uses in literature, gender and sexuality, democracy and aristocracy, language and power, and religion as an instrument of sexual repression.

Sample Syllabus


Cultures and Contexts (College Core Curriculum)

Although the Italian peninsula has been the site of some of the oldest and most significant
civilizations in Western history, the modern Italian state is relatively young, having been
established only in 1861. Italy’s geographical and cultural complexities have ensured that
regional identities throughout the country remain strong, to the extent that many Italians
still identify closely with their more immediate social, cultural, and political traditions.
Furthermore, Italy is positioned as a gateway of the Mediterranean world, making it both
the center (if one views it from the shores of North Africa) and the periphery (if one views
it from the countries bordering the North Sea) of Europe. This course will focus on the
tensions and ambiguities present in post‐unification Italian society, using the rich cultural
and social heritage of Florence as a starting point for the study of the delicate mixture of
regional and national elements that make up contemporary Italy.

Sample Syllabus


Economics

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Pre-calculus or equivalent level of mathematical training

Introduction to the American economy, elements of supply and demand, and basic macroeconomic principles. Includes national income and employment, money, banking, inflation, business fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, the balance of payments, and comparative economic systems. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Pre-calculus or equivalent level of mathematical training

Focuses on individual economic decision makers—households, business firms, and government agencies—and how they are linked together. The emphasis is on decision making by households and firms and how these decisions shape our economic life. Explores the different environments in which businesses sell their products, hire workers, and raise funds to expand their operations; the economic effects of various government policies, such as minimum wage legislation, rent controls, antitrust laws, and more. Conducted in English.

Prerequisites: ECON-UA 1 Economic Principles or ECON-UA 5 Intro to Economic Analysis or equivalents

The financial crisis that hit the global economy since the summer of 2008 is without precedent in post-war economic history. Although its size and extent are exceptional. the crisis has many features in common with similar financial-stress driven recession episodes in the past. However, this time there’s something different, with the crisis being global akin to the events that triggered the Great Depression of the 1930s. This crisis spread quickly and rapidly moved from the US to European countries that show the weakest economic indicators (PIIGS: Portugal, Ireland and Italy, Greece and Spain). This course will focus on the long run causes, consequences and EU responses to the crisis, conditionally on the characteristics of the countries involved. We will focus on the long process of European Integration and discuss whether it may represent a possible solution to the recent crisis.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

We offer a perspective on the workings of the monetary and financial system within a country and at an international level. The role of money and the tools to conduct monetary policy will be analyzed in detail. The concept of the value of money now and in the future helps in understanding the role of interest rates and of risk; various way to store wealth will take us into the structure of financial markets where financial instruments are created and traded to meet diverse needs. Some basic concepts on the role played by commercial banks will introduce the function of the Central Bank and of monetary policy in the overall goal of ensuring financial stability to the system. Current issues, such as the role of the European Central Bank and the instability created by the subprime mortgage crisis, will be discussed.

Sample Syllabus

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Microeconomics & Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1 and ECON-UA 2) or equivalents.

Focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital.The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination; and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics, Intermediate Macroeconomics, & International Economics (NYU ECON-UA 10, ECON-UA 12, & ECON-UA 238) or equivalents.  International Economics can be taken as co-requisite with special permission.

This course aims at offering a global perspective on development, long term change in the world economy, and the interaction between countries, regulatory systems and firms. Recent developments have changed completely the patterns of development and the relationships between developed and developing/emerging countries.
The focus of the course is on the shift of production to East Asia, on poverty and inequality, on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including changes in production patterns (outsourcing, offshoring, service offshoring), on the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances and protectionism, and on the impact of technological innovation on international competitiveness.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra and Calculus with a grade of C or higher or passing placement exam.

This course is only open to Economics Policy Majors and prospective majors.

This course introduces calculus for real valued functions of a single real variable and of several real variables. In particular, it shows how calculus can be used to solve optimization problems for these functions, including constrained optimization problems which can be solved by substitution. A substantial number of economic examples will be analyzed during the course.


European Studies

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus coming soon


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Please note that students accepted to the Gallatin Fashion in Florence Program will be given registration priority for this course. This is a 7 week intensive course.  Specific course dates and meeting times  will be posted in ALBERT.

Italian fashion is famous internationally for its combination of quality and elegance. This course explores the development of fashion as an integral part of Italian identity. It looks at four historical moments or movements that played a significant role in developing that identity: Renaissance Florence under the de Medici, Mussolini’s mandate for Italian-based fashion, the post-war Italian film industry in the 1950s and 60s, and, today’s global fashion industry where the image of Italian style is one of quality, luxury and sexy elegance. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist writers in both Britain and the United States were fascinated by Italy. The "Italy and Italians" of the title refers not only to images and characters in the works of the British and American authors we will be reading but also to their affinities with Italian literature. Recurring themes in the course will be history and its uses in literature, gender and sexuality, democracy and aristocracy, language and power, and religion as an instrument of sexual repression.

Sample Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

Course description coming soon.


History

The Renaissance began and reached maturity in Italy between 1350 and 1500. This course closely examines the political, economic, and social situations in Italy during this period, emphasizing the special conditions that produced Renaissance art and literature. The relationship between culture, society, and politics is studied in the case of Florence, in which the hegemony of the Medici house and its patronage brought the city to cultural leadership in the Western world. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus coming soon

Next to many archives covering past centuries, Florence also hosts one of the most important archives for the study of contemporary history, namely the archive on the European Union. It is organizationally and academically linked to the European University Institute (EUI), also located in Florence, a top-level interdisciplinary graduate institute and think tank.

An archive on the EU represents a welcome challenge for history students, since it is not completely clear "what the EU is". It is neither a state in the traditional sense, nor is it limited to being an international organization. Whereas most forms of stateness in Europe and in the rest of the democratic world can be considered more or less stable, the EU is still a political actor in the making - and there is evidence that it will remain a moving target for historians, political scientists, law experts and economists for still many years to come. Thus, different from other archives, the archive on the EU does not contain documents and information on a historical process which is already completed, but which is and will still be ongoing.

Sample Syllabus

The course is a voyage through the fascinating and complex history and culture of the
Italian South, from the first half of the Nineteenth Century to the present day. Adopting
an interdisciplinary approach we will explore the rich patrimony of southern history, as
well as the violence of a society with neither rules nor justice.

Sample Syllabus


Italian Studies

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

This course analyzes Dante's poetry in itself and as an object of translation and adaptation. The text of the Divine Comedy, a 14,000-line journey through the afterlife, will be studied in terms of its transmission and reception in contemporary culture. Emphasis will be put on Dante's influence on literature, art, music, media and film. The text is read in translation with references to the original Italian facing text. Conducted in English. 

Sample Syllabus

Art History students: This course counts for advanced Ancient/Medieval credit.

This course provides students with an awareness of and appreciation for the cultures and civilization of ancient Italy from 1000 B.C. to 200 A.D. The lectures will examine significant examples of sculpture, painting, architecture, city-planning and the minor arts of the period. The course will include local field trips to important sites and exhibits. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

Presents a study of post-World War II Italian politics and society in comparative and historical perspective. Seeks explanations of Italian political development in specific historical factors such as the 19th century patterns of state formation and the experience of fascism. Comparative analysis seeks to show how the social structure, political culture, and party systems have shaped Italy's distinct development. Current and recurrent political issues include the problem of integrating the south into the national economy and state response to social movements, particularly terrorism. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

This course introduces contemporary Italy in all its complexity and fascination. Reviewing politics, economics, society, and culture over the past two centuries, the course has a primary goal -- to consider how developments since the 1800s have influenced the lives and formed the outlook of today's Italians. In other words, we are engaged in the historical search for something quite elusive: Italian “identity”. Topics will include the unification of the country, national identity in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the First World War, and Italian fascism, World War Two and the resistance, the post-war Italian Republic, the economic "miracle", the South, the Mafia, terrorism, popular culture, and the most recent political and social developments, including Italy and the European Union. Lectures combine with readings and films (taking advantage of Italy’s magnificent post-war cinema).

Sample Syllabus coming soon

Urban culture is complex, fantastic, frightening, and a part of daily life, encompassing everything from the opera to street musicians, the public library to the piazza, the theater to local cafes and social clubs. This course, where cities are considered to be sources of cultural invention, explores through literature, history, social science and student experience, the evolution of high and popular culture, both modernist and post-modern. Emphasis will be placed on how cultures create bonds between specific interest groups, and how culture becomes the arena for acting out or resolving group conflict. This course will focus on Italian cities, including Florence. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

The course covers the evolution of Italian opera from its beginnings in Florence to the early 20th century with special emphasis on Monteverdi, Rossini, Donizetti, Verdi and Puccini. The approach is multidisciplinary and aims at a comprehensive survey of the music theatre in the context of the Italian cultural heritage. Literary sources, musico-dramatic features, vocal styles are studied in connection with major works that best represent trends and genres in the Italian operatic tradition. Students are expected to master the distinctive characteristics of such genres as favola in musica, intermezzo, opera seria, opera buffa, grand opera, dramma lirico, and the basic elements of Italian versification. Students listen to and watch recorded operas and attend performances in Florence or other Italian cities. Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus

This course presents an investigation on the transformations of political communications in period between the so-called Italian "Second Republic", dominated by the larger-than-life and ubiquitous presence of media tycoon and sports entrepreneur Silvio Berlusconi, and the recent emergence
of Internet-based political movement Movimento Cinque Stelle (Five Stars Movement), led by former stand-up comedian and prominent blogger Beppe Grillo. In the course, students will be introduced to the main political and cultural features of this period, spanning two decades, that has witnessed a high level of interpenetration between the political sphere and the media sphere, with a constant interchange of cultural, financial and institutional dynamics. 

Sample Syllabus


Law and Society

This course provides a thorough introduction to the international system for the protection of human rights and the preconditions under which it functions at international and national levels. The course aims to develop the students' interest in, and knowledge of, international human rights; to explore human rights theory and practice; to introduce various human rights conventions and mechanisms, particularly the United Nations system; and to provide advanced instruction in several key aspects of international human rights, including the effects of globalisation on human rights, the question of the universality / cultural-specificity of human rights, and the so-called 'interdependence' of various human rights.

Sample Syllabus


Mathematics

Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra and Calculus with a grade of C or higher or passing placement exam.

This course is only open to Economics Policy Majors and prospective majors.

This course introduces calculus for real valued functions of a single real variable and of several real variables. In particular, it shows how calculus can be used to solve optimization problems for these functions, including constrained optimization problems which can be solved by substitution. A substantial number of economic examples will be analyzed during the course.

 

 

 


Media, Culture, & Communication

This course presents an investigation on the transformations of political communications in period between the so-called Italian "Second Republic", dominated by the larger-than-life and ubiquitous presence of media tycoon and sports entrepreneur Silvio Berlusconi, and the recent emergence
of Internet-based political movement Movimento Cinque Stelle (Five Stars Movement), led by former stand-up comedian and prominent blogger Beppe Grillo. In the course, students will be introduced to the main political and cultural features of this period, spanning two decades, that has witnessed a high level of interpenetration between the political sphere and the media sphere, with a constant interchange of cultural, financial and institutional dynamics. 

Sample Syllabus


Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The Renaissance began and reached maturity in Italy between 1350 and 1500. This course closely examines the political, economic, and social situations in Italy during this period, emphasizing the special conditions that produced Renaissance art and literature. The relationship between culture, society, and politics is studied in the case of Florence, in which the hegemony of the Medici house and its patronage brought the city to cultural leadership in the Western world. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

This course is made up of four sections. The first opens with an analysis of the intellectual foundations of the witch-hunt from late Antiquity to the early Renaissance. The second section concentrates on the most infamous handbook for witch-hunters, Malleus Maleficarum (“The Hammer of the Witches”) and on the roots of medieval misogyny. The third section looks at the mass witch-hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries on the backdrop of the break between Protestant and Catholic Europe, and examines the connections linking witch-hunting to the momentous social, political and religious changes of the times. In the fourth part, the course will shift focus to the grassroots level, shedding light on the economic and social mechanisms which lead a community to “make a witch”.

Sample Syllabus


Metropolitan Studies

Urban culture is complex, fantastic, frightening, and a part of daily life, encompassing everything from the opera to street musicians, the public library to the piazza, the theater to local cafes and social clubs. This course, where cities are considered to be sources of cultural invention, explores through literature, history, social science and student experience, the evolution of high and popular culture, both modernist and post-modern. Emphasis will be placed on how cultures create bonds between specific interest groups, and how culture becomes the arena for acting out or resolving group conflict. This course will focus on Italian cities, including Florence. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus


Music

The course covers the evolution of Italian opera from its beginnings in Florence to the early 20th century with special emphasis on Monteverdi, Rossini, Donizetti, Verdi and Puccini. The approach is multidisciplinary and aims at a comprehensive survey of the music theatre in the context of the Italian cultural heritage. Literary sources, musico-dramatic features, vocal styles are studied in connection with major works that best represent trends and genres in the Italian operatic tradition. Students are expected to master the distinctive characteristics of such genres as favola in musica, intermezzo, opera seria, opera buffa, grand opera, dramma lirico, and the basic elements of Italian versification. Students listen to and watch recorded operas and attend performances in Florence or other Italian cities. Conducted in English

Sample Syllabus


Photography

Prerequisite: Photo I or equivalent. An analog or a digital camera with manual settings is required. Students registering for this course must also register for Directed Projects Lab  (0 points).

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Student should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

Florence can be considered the historic capital of optics: as the leading center for the production of lenses and spectacles in the Renaissance, it was also a center for extraordinary experimentation regarding the science of vision.  The experiments and writings of such masters as Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Giovan Battista della Porta and Galileo, among others, are testimony to the extraordinary contributions made here to the understanding of sight and to the development of devices that aided, altered or controlled vision for artistic purpose.

This course proposes to contextualize historic photographic techniques within this rich context of the history of optics.  An invaluable resource for this exploration will be the Acton Photograph Archive at Villa La Pietra with its rich collection of stereographs, daguerrotypes, ambrotypes, silver prints and albumen prints.  Students will thus be able to learn about these historic techniques by examining firsthand surviving, in some cases extremely rare, examples of them.

Following the inspiration of these historic techniques, from the experiments of the Florentine Renaissance artists to those of the Alinari Brothers, a firm founded in Florence in the nineteenth century and renowned throughout the world as an early innovator in the uses and techniques of photography, students will have the opportunity to explore these techniques themselves hands on.  They will be encouraged to develop their individual expression through their own projects employing one or more of these historic photographic techniques.  This inspiring course on experimental photography explores new possibilities of imagemaking by combining pinhole and toy cameras and other alternative techniques with a theoretical approach to representation.

Sample Syllabus

 A digital SLR camera is required.

NOTE: This course meets in the center of Florence. Students should allow for 30 minutes commute time between this class and their prior or subsequent class.

The course Photojournalism: Exploring Italian Society focuses on the contemporary life of Florence, a city best known as a UNESCO World Heritage site, but that is also a European city attempting to rise to the challenges that currently confront other urban environments throughout Europe and the world. The course draws its strengths from the unique resources of the program and the city of Florence. From Italian labor protests, to commemoration of historic events, to immigrant populations, mass transit and tourism, Florence has many compelling contemporary visual stories to tell. Students have the unique opportunity to capture these issues in images.

Sample Syllabus

City, territory and architecture have been, from the beginning of photography, privileged objects for its practice. Photography has become a tool to strengthen the understanding of architecture, to highlight aesthetic and design ideas and to critically interpret space. This class focuses on architectural photography and the photography of urban space, both in relation to their historical roots and contemporary practice, covering the theoretical connections between architecture and photography. Through course assignments students will learn to confront a variety of challenges presented by photographing different architectural styles. By the end of the course, each student will have produced a portfolio of architectural photography.

This is an intermediate photography course. Each student must have basic knowledge of digital photographic techniques and their own digital camera with manually adjustable aperture and shutter speed. The course is a combination of lectures and labs for a total of six hours per week.

Sample Syllabus


Physics

Prerequisite: Classical and Quantum Waves (PHYS-UA 105)

Course Description:

Particle physics is the study of the very fundamental constituents of matter and of the forces between them. By its nature it is microscopic, but it also connects with astrophysics and cosmology on the largest scales. This course introduces the most important advances in elementary particle physics. It centers on journal articles in which these advances were first published, with overview lectures, original reading, discussion, and student presentations. Topics include the discovery of elementary particles in cosmic rays, antimatter, symmetries found in nature, and the invention of the Quark model of elementary particles and its experimental verification. A field trip with a visit to CERN is planned for the course.

Sample Syllabus

Course Description:

In addition to the magnifi cent flowering of the arts in the Renaissance, the Renaissance period was also one of extraordinary advance in science, in particular in astronomy and physics. The course
will examine this advance, emanating from the scientific developments in the European and Italian centers of learning during the Renaissance and at the start of the Age of Enlightenment, in the light of prior wisdom. The topics will center on the 'Copernican Revolution' of Nicolaus Copernicus, Johannes Kepler, and Galileo Galilei that was the beginning of observational science and astronomy.

The course is a combined science and science-history course, open to all students, including non-science majors, with no prerequisites. Physics majors will attend an extra recitation to receive elective credit toward the major.

Sample Syllabus


Politics

This course will introduce students to the study of comparative politics, which is defined as the study of domestic politics anywhere in the world.  As a way of cutting into this vast topic, we specifically focus on the process of democratic transition by analyzing the democratic revolution that has swept the globe during the last thirty-five years. In turn we will explore the causes of democratization, threats to democratization, and factors that may aid in a successful consolidation of democracy. As part of this process, students will be exposed to a wide range of topics in comparative politics, including theories of democratic transitions, the politics of economic reform, voting, parties, and electoral systems, and theories of ethnic conflict.

Please note: this course fulfills the requirement for a “core” course for Politics majors, the first time such a course has been offered at NYU-Florence, and is taught by Professor Tucker, who normally teaches the course in New York. As such, it is to date the only opportunity *anywhere* to take a politics core course in a small class format.  As an introductory course, it is also perfectly appropriate for non-politics majors as well.

Sample Syllabus

 

The European Union is a unique and strange entity.  It has 27 states and 500 million people. Its GNP is more or less equal to that of the USA. Many of its members share a common currency and a common monetary policy.  Yet it is a union without a state. The spectacular progress in the area of economic integration has not been matched by the creation of a common government and a common identity.  The economic giant is still a political dwarf as it has been confirmed time and again whenever there is an international crisis,. Yet so far this strange entity has been working. Its achievements in the economic arena have been remarkable. The course will analyze in an interdisciplinary fashion the making of the Union, its institutions, its policies and its prospects in the very challenging environment of today.  Probably more so than in any other period in its history the survival of the Union, as we have known it, will be tested by the impact of the most serious crisis of the post-war period.  Particular attention will be given to the new economic governance established by the Union in responding to the problems posed by the poor economic and financial performance of some of its members, i.e. the PIGS (Portugal, Ireland, Greece, Spain). Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

Presents a study of post-World War II Italian politics and society in comparative and historical perspective. Seeks explanations of Italian political development in specific historical factors such as the 19th century patterns of state formation and the experience of fascism. Comparative analysis seeks to show how the social structure, political culture, and party systems have shaped Italy's distinct development. Current and recurrent political issues include the problem of integrating the south into the national economy and state response to social movements, particularly terrorism. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

In our society the need for deep understanding of what is going on translates into a need to keep track what has happened, how to outline trends, plan the future knowing the present or the past. We have all heard about demographic pressure, social policies, health care planning, inflation, market volatility: these are all concepts which rely heavily on statistical information. Changes have to be managed properly and in an informed way: scientific experiments be they on a medicine, on fertilizer or airbags must be planned as to ensure their validity. Total quality in production is a statistics-based philosophy of management, and if you like a commercial it is also because a statistician has provided information about consumer tastes and behaviour. In this course we will provide an introduction to the tools of statistics but most importantly we will try and understand the rationale behind statistics.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores the role of the US in Europe from the end of World War II to the present with a particular emphasis on understanding the sources of cooperation and conflict. The topics covered in the first part will include the US vision of the new international order, the end of the old European balance of power, the Cold War and the division of Europe, the building of the Western alliance, the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. The second part of the course will concentrate on contemporary issues ranging from the evolution of NATO to trade relations and the role of the dollar and the euro in the international monetary system. Particular attention will also be given to the challenges posed by the ‘war on terror’, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 


Psychology

The additional Psychology course currently being confirmed for Spring 2014  is Intro to Psychology (PSYCH-UA 9001)

Prerequisite for NYU Students: PSYCH-UA 1/Introduction to Psychology

Introduction and overview of theoretical issues and selected research in developmental psychology. Focus on infancy through adolescence. Lectures interweave theory, methods, and findings about how we develop as perceiving, thinking, and feeling beings. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 

Religious Studies

This course is made up of four sections. The first opens with an analysis of the intellectual foundations of the witch-hunt from late Antiquity to the early Renaissance. The second section concentrates on the most infamous handbook for witch-hunters, Malleus Maleficarum (“The Hammer of the Witches”) and on the roots of medieval misogyny. The third section looks at the mass witch-hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries on the backdrop of the break between Protestant and Catholic Europe, and examines the connections linking witch-hunting to the momentous social, political and religious changes of the times. In the fourth part, the course will shift focus to the grassroots level, shedding light on the economic and social mechanisms which lead a community to “make a witch”.

Sample Syllabus


Sociology

Consumption practices in advanced, market societies seem to have replaced the importance of productive activities in the reproduction of the social order. Consumption has tended to cover a dual role: both economic (of course) and cultural (and this is a rather new role). The importance of consumer goods and the meaning attached to consumption processes are by now fully recognized by the social sciences as important parts in the construction of group-identity and self-image. Consumerism pervades people's everyday lives and generates relative deprivation phenomena throughout. However the relationship between consumption and consumerism is not self-evident. The Course intends to discuss the relationship between 'consumption' and 'consumerism' broadly following the assumption that “while consumption is an act, consumerism may be perceived as a way of life”.

 

Sample Syllabus 

In our society the need for deep understanding of what is going on translates into a need to keep track what has happened, how to outline trends, plan the future knowing the present or the past. We have all heard about demographic pressure, social policies, health care planning, inflation, market volatility: these are all concepts which rely heavily on statistical information. Changes have to be managed properly and in an informed way: scientific experiments be they on a medicine, on fertilizer or airbags must be planned as to ensure their validity. Total quality in production is a statistics-based philosophy of management, and if you like a commercial it is also because a statistician has provided information about consumer tastes and behaviour. In this course we will provide an introduction to the tools of statistics but most importantly we will try and understand the rationale behind statistics.

Sample Syllabus

This course will introduce students to the study of criminal organizations in Italy and abroad. Analysis of real-world data over the last decades, such as court proceedings and crime statistics, dismisses many of the accepted myths about Italian mafias. We will explore the organization of mafia groups, rules and codes, activities both in legitimate business and illegal markets, and their relationship to politics. This comparative approach will help students identify those factors facilitating the emergence, migration and persistence of organized crime across countries. The course will include a review of the legislative efforts and best-practices designed to prevent and control organized crime in Italy and in the United States.

Sample Syllabus


Italian Immersion Program

The following courses are part of the Italian Immersion program. Some courses are conducted in Italian, while others are taught in English, with Italian instruction and assignments for students in the program. Courses are open to all students studying at NYU in Florence who have completed one course beyond intermediate Italian, or who have equivalent fluency.

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 11, ITAL-UA 12, Intermediate Italian I & II; or ITAL-UA 20, Intensive Intermediate Italian

Intensive review of Italian grammar through written and oral exercises, conversations, compositions, translation, and readings from contemporary Italian literature. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites: ITAL-UA 30, Advanced Review of Modern Italian

Students entering the course should have mastered the fundamental structure of Italian. The course is designed to help students gain confidence and increase their effectiveness in speaking present-day Italian. Through discussions, oral reports, and readings, students develop vocabulary in a variety of topics, improve pronunciation, and learn an extensive range of idiomatic expressions. Conducted in Italian.

Sample Syllabus 

Italian instruction will be offered for Italian Immersion students.

Presents a study of post-World War II Italian politics and society in comparative and historical perspective. Seeks explanations of Italian political development in specific historical factors such as the 19th century patterns of state formation and the experience of fascism. Comparative analysis seeks to show how the social structure, political culture, and party systems have shaped Italy's distinct development. Current and recurrent political issues include the problem of integrating the south into the national economy and state response to social movements, particularly terrorism. Conducted in English.

Sample Syllabus 


Apply Now!

Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester

Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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