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Course content and class availability are subject to change. All students are required to take a Spanish Language course. Regular hours of class time are 9:00am-7:15pm.

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) - Please note that we are in the process of uploading syllabi and plan to have more available online soon.  In the meantime, if you have an need a course syllabus immediately, please email global.academics@nyu.edu

Please review the NYU Buenos Aires Registration Guidelines for important information before registering for classes.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students must participate in Global Orientations. Students do not need to enroll for this course during registration.
  • Enrollment in a Spanish Language course is required; select one that matches your skill level.
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass/fail
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • SCA-UA 9042/INDIV-UG 9150 is a permission only class. Students must apply ahead of time for this course. Application information can be found here. During registration week, register for another course as a place holder in case you are not accepted.
  • ECON-UA 9231 Money & Banking: Argentina has prerequisites, visiting students email global.academics@nyu.edu for permission.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

Required Course for All Students

The purpose of this class is to introduce the students into key concepts and issues of Contemporary Argentina and its geopolitical context, e.g. Latin America and the World. Through an approach to local, cultural, and political issues the course will address how Argentina interacts with the region and the world, and how this international context impacts on Argentina. The emphasis will be on addressing a number of concepts that are necessary to understand Contemporary Argentina, politics in Buenos Aires and their relationship with the world. Spanish spoken in the Rio de la Plata region will be taught from a pragmatic approach, encouraging the learning and use of local expressions and Argentine Spanish, including political expressions used in the media, political activism and the everyday life of porteños –the inhabitants of Buenos Aires.

Sample Syllabus (PDF)

 

Spanish Language

All students are required to take a Spanish language course (or course taught in Spanish) for graded credit.  This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail.

Spanish 9004 (Intermediate Spanish II) is a four-credit intermediate level course that reviews and continues the material covered in Spanish 9003. Readings and discussions of contemporary Hispanic texts and review of the main grammatical concepts of Spanish. Completion of this course fulfills the MAP foreign language requirement.

The principal goal of this course is to provide you with the opportunity to improve your oral and written communication skills in the language, by applying all the grammar rules you have learned and will be reviewing. You will be expected to substantially increase your working vocabulary and make solid progress in reading and writing skills.

Sample Syllabus

Intensive Elementary Spanish, SPAN-UA 9010, is an accelerated 6-credit course that combines Spanish for Beginners I and II. This course focuses on the development of communication language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. These four skills will be approached and practiced in order to help students immerse and interact in a Spanish language context. Grammar will be taught through a communicative approach; classroom activities will integrate the language skills mentioned above. Classes will be conducted in Spanish. There will be emphasis on verbal practice, which will be carried out beyond the sentence level. Use and understanding of basic grammatical terminology will also be a necessary component of the course.

Sample Syllabus

Intensive Spanish for Advanced Beginners is a six-credit intensive language course designed to help students with limited knowledge of Spanish strengthen their language skills and develop their cultural competency. Our immediate and ultimate goal is on improving communication skills ins Spanish through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Interaction and building learning communities are emphasized in all of our classroom and at-home activities. The course covers the material of Spanish 2 and Spanish 3 in one semester. Successful completion of this course prepares students for a fourth semester college Spanish language course.

By the end of the semester, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of reading and writing skills at the appropriate level. They will be able to read, write, speak and present information in Spanish with more fluency and confidence.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisites SPAN-UA 10, SPAN -UA 2 or equivalents, or passing grade on qualifying examination.

SPAN-UA 9020.002 (Intensive Intermediate Spanish) is a six-credit course that continues and reviews the introductory level Spanish learned in SPAN-UA.1 and SPAN-UA.2, or in SPANUA. 10, while introducing literary readings, short films, and more complex composition exercises. The course involves an integration of the four basic skills: listening, speaking,reading and writing with the aim to improve communication in Spanish. Through this integrated approach, you will participate in a practical application of vocabulary, grammar,and culture. The course emphasizes mastery of language skills through specific contexts and dialogical situations.At the end of the course students will read a novel which will also be used to review many of the grammatical points covered in the textbook and class work, to improve analytical thinking and literary criticism skills, as well as to verbally express opinions about the situations presented in the novel.

The goals of this course are to provide you with the opportunity to improve your oral and written communication skills in the language, by applying all the grammar rules you have learned and will be reviewing. You will be expected to substantially increase your working vocabulary and make solid progress in reading and writing skills.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Intermediate Spanish II (NYU, SPAN-UA 4) or equivalent

Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (SPAN-UA 100) is a four-credit advanced-level course designed to expand and consolidate the student’s lexical and grammatical understanding of the language and to introduce him/her to the fundamental principles of expository writing as they apply to Spanish, through exercises, readings, and intensive practice of various prose techniques and styles. 

Sample Syllabus

Spanish for Health Care Professionals is a two-credit course for beginner to intermediate
level students, designed to expand students’ speaking skills beyond the practical, day-to-
day language functions in the medical environment.

The goal of the course is to serve as a complement for the beginner and intermediate level
student pursuing a career in the health care professions or a student generally interested
in communicating with patients in Spanish. It has been structured to serve the specific
needs of the nursing, medical and global public health student community. Students will
typically take this course in conjunction with a beginner or an intermediate level Spanish
language course. This course may not be used toward completion of the MAP language
requirement.

Sample Syllabus


Courses Taught in Spanish at the Intermediate Level

Corequisite: Intensive Intermediate Spanish or Intermediate Spanish II.

The course is designed for students who want to perfect their Spanish as they expand their knowledge regarding literature, cinema, and social and political problems that exist today within modern Argentine society. The reading of different dramatic texts and viewing of various films throughout the semester will serve to expand lexicon, strengthen grammar and improve the student's style. The objective of this course is that the students familiarize themselves with everyday language of current newspapers and magazines, at the same time as they enter into the world of Spanish literature.

The most important goal of the course is to offer a methodologically simple approximation that helps the student to develop a greater verbal and communicative dexterity. To this end, every week the students will analyze and debate the cultural and literary content texts that are to be studied and every two weeks the students will present a written composition of the topics covered in class. In the classroom linguistic correction will be emphasized along with auditory practice through the use of a wide range of materials and resources: theoretical explanations, comprehension and vocabulary exercises, film viewing, as well as exercises that highlight certain morphological aspects or grammatical usage of Spanish.

Sample Syllabus


Courses Taught in Spanish

Art History

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed Advanced Grammar and Composition or enrolled concurrently in Advanced Grammar and Composition.

The course will examine key aspects of Latin American art from the colonial period to the early decades of the twentieth century. Through the analysis of artistic images of Mexico, Peru, Brazil and Argentina, will discuss the role of visual representation in the process of conquest and colonization of the territory in Latin America, and later in the construction and consolidation of national states and regional identities. With the alternation of guided visits to museums in Buenos Aires and classes, students will have the opportunity to learn about artistic languages​​, techniques, iconography, production systems, and some aspects of Latin American history.

 

 

Gallatin

Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU, SPAN-UA 100 or equivalent)

This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primitive art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primitive and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Sample Syllabus

History

Course will be taught in English during Spring 2016.

When Taught in Spanish, Prerequisite of Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU SPAN-UA 100 Advanced Grammar & Composition or equivalent.)

The objective of the course is to analyze the social, cultural and political transformations experienced in Argentina during the XX century. The scheduled activities are divided into theory-practice classes and cultural visits. There are required readings for the classes which are usually based in a general bibliography that will give the student a factual context of each unit. Ideas exchange will take place, so the students should read the material in advance in order to continue with the course. The objective of cultural activities is to link the students with the material dimension of history, putting themselves in contact with crucial clues for its comprehension.


 Sample Syllabus

Latin American & Spanish Studies

Open to students who have completed Advanced Grammar and Composition or enrolled concurrently in Advanced Grammar and Composition.

La lengua de Buenos Aires is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the most outstanding features of the Spanish of the Rio de la Plata area. It does also work as an introductory map to the main problems and questions of the culture of the city of Buenos Aires. Through a lively discussion of current cultural conflicts in politics, literature, music, drama and film, the course will enhance the listening and reading abilities of the students, while improving their speaking and writing proficiency in Spanish. These said conflicts and their transformations are key to an understanding of the way porteños speak and think. From a first section devoted to political discourse, we will move onto a consideration of its rhetorical precedents in argentine literature. This will give us the critical tools we need to further our inquiries in other fields such as rock, drama, journalism and film.

Sample Syllabus

Formerly Titled Critical Approaches: Reading, Writing, and Textual Analysis

Prerequisite: SPAN-UA 100 Advanced Grammar & Composition or equivalent.

Introduction to literary analysis through close reading of texts from the early to modern periods of peninsular Spanish and Spanish American literatures. Engages students in the practice of textual explication, provides basic critical skills, and encourages reflection on literature as a system. This course is the gateway course for students interested in pursuing advanced literature courses in Spanish. With very few exceptions, students must have completed Critical Approaches before taking advanced literature courses taught in Spanish.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200.

Mitos, Íconos y Tradiciones Inventadas seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course is structured in four topics. The first two weeks work as an introduction, and are devoted to ways of representing political authority in Latin America. The core of the course seeks to study and discuss three issues that are crucial for an understanding of our present: Violence in Latin America, Drugs and the Narco-machine, The Economy of Latin American Passion. Students will study these topics through a variety of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and songs.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200. 

This course explores writings on Latin America from the Conquest to the present and the representation of the region in literature in a broad sense. We will pay attention to images that emphasize the extraordinary and the ordinary, drawing comparisons between Latin America and Europe and North America, examining accounts of first contact with the new world, and reading descriptions of the social and natural world. Writers and travelers wondered about the identity and particular features of local cultures and produced works where this inquiry can be examined. Often associated with the supernatural and the sublime, Latin America was also depicted in its everyday life (the common) that unfolded along side Revolutions, political violence, and natural beauty. By contrasting the ordinary and the extraordinary the course sheds light on different images of the region. Readings include letters by Cristóbal Colón and Hernán Cortés, poems by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, as well as works by Alexander Von Humboldt, Simon Bolívar, Alejo Carpentier, Esteban Echeverrí­a, Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, Rubén Darío, Juan Carlos Onetti, Roberto Arlt, Clarice Lispector, Juan Rulfo, and Mario Levrero. Films and visual arts will also be part of the material examined in the course.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200.

Este curso se propone discutir y examinar diferentes formas en que el terror aparece y se despliega en la literatura rioplatense (mayormente en Argentina, aunque también incluye algunos escritores del Uruguay) desde mediados del siglo XIX hasta la actualidad. El terror es uno de los elementos constitutivos de la literatura y la cultura rioplatense prácticamente desde sus orígenes. En varios de sus textos considerados “fundacionales”, el terror, vinculado directamente con ciertas prácticas políticas, es motivo de reflexión al mismo tiempo que se vuelve un eje alrededor del cual se organiza la escritura. Pero ese interés por el terror se manifiesta no sólo a través del análisis político, filosófico o histórico de la cuestión, sino también a partir de un tratamiento literario que parece exhibir mejor que cualquier análisis la esencia y el funcionamiento del terror. Por eso la presencia del terror en los inicios de la literatura rioplatense también puede y debe analizarse teniendo en cuenta otra perspectiva: la del terror en tanto género o modo de lo literario, derivado directo de la narrativa gótica que surge en Europa en la segunda mitad del siglo XVIII. Ese cruce entre terror político y terror literario es una marca que está en el origen de la literatura rioplatense y que va a perdurar, con algunas variantes, hasta la actualidad.


El propósito del curso es partir del repaso de algunas definiciones y conceptos vinculados con el “terror”, para luego hacer un análisis de diferentes textos de la literatura rioplatense, desde los inicios, en los que es perceptible claramente el cruce entre política, literatura y terror, pasando por otros momentos en los que esa relación se resignifica y el terror toma formas diversas, pero sin abandonar ese cruce fundacional.

The literature of the twentieth century was marked by putting the focus on the ego of the writer. Whether to hide, to show or display timidly without prejudice, the fact is that I became the star of the literary changes that point to the XXI century. This phenomenon, which occurs both in poetry and in fiction and drama, allowing the emergence of forms that previously had no literary prestige, such as diaries, chronicles and, contemporaneously, the blog.This course aims to analyze the true path of these subjective transformations in direct relation to the historical and social contexts in which they occur. For this narrative and poetic work of many contemporary American writers. Furthermore, in order to achieve a living contact with the materials to work, curriculum content will alternate with visits to various literary events that are related to the program, and also invite some of the writers studied to participate in the classes.

Sample Syllabus

Students wishing to take this course for Major or Minor Credit in Latin American Studies or Spanish must register under the SPAN-UA 9762 number. Students from both sections will attend English lectures together, but those registered under SPAN-UA 9762 will receive enhanced reading and writing assignments in Spanish.

Prerequisites for SPAN-UA 9762: SPAN-UA 200 or may be taken concurrently with SPAN-UA 9200

This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important problems and debates about Latin American history, society and culture. Latin America is a complex region full of contrasts. Its population is both racially and culturally heterogeneous. Its many countries share some common cultural roots and political origins, but also have distinct histories. The structure of this course is primarily chronological but also thematic. We will start with the Conquest and its legacies and we will end with the problems that we experience today in big cities in Latin America. The course favors a multi-disciplinary approach, and therefore we will use a different array of materials including films, letters, photographs and essays. We will emphasize first hand accounts of the topics we discuss.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200.

The course is designed to introduce students to the work of Jorge Luis Borges, one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. Through reading, analysis, and discussion of short fiction or poems and critical bibliography, the students will examine the dichotomy civilization-barbarism in Borges works (in connection to the Argentine cultural tradition since nineteenth century); some key topics in his texts such as tigers, labyrinths and libraries; the relationship between writing and translation (specifically in the English translations of his fictions); the political aspects of the literature produced by Borges and other contemporary Argentine writers on Eva Perón. The course will also develop the connections between Borges and other contemporary Argentine writers.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200.


La literatura del siglo XX se caracterizó por poner el foco en el yo del escritor. Ya sea para ocultarlo, para mostrarlo tímidamente o para exhibirlo sin prejuicios, lo cierto es que el yo se transformó en el protagonista de los cambios literarios que apuntan al siglo XXI. Este fenómeno, que se produce tanto en la poesía como en la narrativa y en el teatro, permite el surgimiento de formas que antes carecían de prestigio literario, como el diario íntimo, las crónicas y, contemporáneamente, el blog. Este curso se propone analizar el recorrido de estas verdaderas transformaciones subjetivas, en relación directa con los contextos histórico-sociales en los que se producen. Para esto se trabajarán textos narrativos y poéticos de diversos escritores latinoamericanos contemporáneos. Además, con el fin de lograr un contacto vivo con los materiales a trabajar, se alternarán los contenidos curriculares con visitas a diversos eventos literarios que tengan relación con el programa, y también se invitará a algunos de los escritores estudiados a participar de las clases.

Sample Syllabus

The course comprises topics related to culture, cultural identity and cultural and identity politics referred to five cases located in Latin America: 1) indigenous peoples in Argentina (areas of Chaco: Qom/toba- Wichí and Mocoví, and Patagonia-Pampa: Rankülche) and indigenous peoples in Amazon (Achuar) and, 2) Andean farmers (Aymaras) and indigenous workers of Chaco (Toba), 3) popular sectors of the City of Buenos Aires (“villeros” [shanty town residents], pickets, "barras bravas" [soccer hooligans]) and 4) middle class in San Pablo and Buenos Aires. Through this empirical tour students will learn about and analyze different records related to the debate on "culture" that commenced years ago: essentialism
and constructivism, redefinition of opposing concepts nature/culture, multiculturalism, domination and resistance, activism, etc.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed SPAN-UA 200 Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in SPAN-UA 9200 or permission of the instructor.

This course seeks to familiarize students with the historical, geographical, ethnic, and socio-linguistic factors that contributed to the large variety of Spanish dialects spoken in the Americas. Why do people in Costa Rica speak like those in Uruguay and not like their neighbors in Panama? Why do Colombians have a different vocabulary in Bogotá and in Cartagena de Indias? Or when are “tú”, “usted” or “vos” used as forms of addressing people, and by whom? A web of factors combined to create a wide range of variations to the Castilian Spanish brought to America, itself the result of drastic changes since its evolution from its Latin roots.

The course is organized in four modules. Starting with the study of the origins of the language spoken by the colonizers arriving from Spain since the end of the fifteenth century, the first module will deal with the development of the distinct dialectal zones emerging in Spanish America through the intersection of political and geographical factors with the sociological, cultural and linguistic influence of indigenous and African groups. From the vantage point of standard Castilian Spanish, in the second module we will study the phonic, morpho-syntactic, lexical, and semantic changes undergone by the language, resulting in the distinct variations spoken today. The third module will cover the dialects of five salient geo-linguistic areas of Spanish America, through a historical overview of each region and its specific linguistic characteristics. We will complete this analysis in the fourth module, with a brief overview of the Spanish spoken in the United States, and the new “dialect”, Spanglish, that has emerged from it.

Sample Syllabus

Este curso se pregunta qué es y cómo se lee una fotografía. Consideraremos además la relación entre fotografía y literatura a partir del análisis de textos que incluyen fotografías en diálogo con la escritura o en otros que, sin incluir imágenes, usan la fotografía como tema, principio constructivo o como un cuerpo de problemas críticos y teóricos. El curso servirá también como introducción a la producción fotográfica local que será vista y comentada en las clases (en los distintos “Recorridos visuales”) así como en las visitas a museos, galerías y estudios fotográficos. Prestaremos especial atención a cuestiones como la relación entre signo y existencia del objeto, el valor de verdad de lo fotográfico, su relación con lo real y el realismo, la memoria, la identidad, el tiempo, el museo. (El curso se enseña en español y requiere habilidad para leer textos literarios breves en español; se ha elegido especialmente bibliografía teórica y crítica escrita o traducida al inglés).

Music


When taught in Spanish section: Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU SPAN-UA 100 Advanced Grammar & Composition or equivalent.)

A journey through the different styles of Latin American Popular Music (LAPM), particularly those coming from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. Their roots, influences and characteristics. Their social and historical context. Their uniqueness and similarities. Emphasis in the rhythmic aspect of folk music as a foundation for dance and as a resource of cultural identity. Even though there is no musical prerequisite, the course is recommended for students with any kind and/or level of musical experience.

The course explores both the traditional and the contemporary forms of LAPM Extensive listening/analysis of recorded music and in-class performing of practical music examples will be primary features of the course. Throughout the semester, several guest musicians will be performing and/or giving clinic presentations to the class. A short reaction paper will be required after each clinic. These clinics might be scheduled in a different time slot or even day than the regular class meeting, provided that is no time conflict with other courses for any of the students.

Sample Syllabus (English)

Sample Syllabus (Spanish) - Not offered in Spanish in Fall 2015 or Spring 2016


Courses Taught in English

Art History

Course Description Below based on New York version of this course. An updated description, which will differ slightly, is expected soon. 

Exhibitions are spaces of knowledge, experience, and entertainment. This course studies the methods, functions, and conditions of exhibition practice, through visual and textual analysis as well as exhibition visits. Although the history of exhibitions and museums, from the 18th to 21st century, will provide an underlying basis for this course, special attention will be paid to the present. New York will be considered as a center of cultural experimentation where artists (including Latin American artists) share ideas in a global context. We will visit a variety of exhibitions on view in the city when class will be on-site in order to develop critical skills and address the following questions: What are the major theoretical and practical issues at stake in different kinds of exhibitions, and how can we perceive their significance? What is the relationship between the curator and artist/s? What role does museum architecture play in creating a context for experiencing exhibitions? What are some illuminating interactions between exhibitions and contemporary thought? Finally, what is an exhibition? Readings will include essays by curators, writers, and critics such as Walter Benjamin, Jorge Luis Borges, Michael Brenson, Brian O’Doherty and Mari Carmen Ramírez.

This course studies modern and contemporary art and architecture through a strategic focus on the cities of Buenos Aires, New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City. We consider key artworks and architectural movements, approaching art history in urban, socio-historical and contextual terms. Emphasis is placed upon the city as a hub for the production and reception of art.

Cities are multifarious complexes of paradoxical elements, where rhythms of stasis and motion coexist. Every city absorbs creative interchange, while also triggering different types of transformation. Our speculations on the urban environment will bring up multiple questions that point back to and extend beyond the mere physical structure of the city, discovering arenas of social action. How does art exploits the characteristics of the metropolis? How is art distributed and consumed throughout the dense fabric of the city? We will explore art (primarily Latin American art) as a staging ground for the city, and the city as staging ground for art.

Developing comparative perspectives on Buenos Aires, New York, Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City will illuminate the particularities of the places under investigation, albeit with reference to aesthetic trajectories as well as broader technological, economic, and social-political changes. New York is included in our selected network of Latin American cities, acknowledging its critical importance as a center of cultural experimentation where artists (including Latin American artists) share ideas in a global context.

Work in class will focus on both visual and textual analysis, employing images, manifestos and critical essays. The course includes a lively program of tours throughout Buenos Aires, visits to museums and private art collections, and conversations with guest contemporary artists.

Sample Syllabus

 

Applied Psychology

This course is designed to give students a comprehensive overview of developmental psychology following a chronological approach. The course covers major theories and research findings on human development, and provides students with the opportunity to appreciate the practical significance of sound theory and research. The course has two distinguishing features: (1) a cross-cultural focus and, (2) an applied emphasis.

By the end of the semester, students will be able to: (a) summarize the major theories, concepts and research methods in developmental psychology, especially as these relate to the study of child development in different contexts, (b) identify basic developmental processes and milestones, and (c) apply developmental concepts to real life situations through the observation of children in their natural settings.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies

This class begins with a review of adolescent and young adult developmental theory to provide students with a framework of the psychosocial conflicts present during the college years. In addition to that, students are also presented with research on relocation, from tourism to migration to exile. Rather than looking at these issues from a psychopathological perspective, however, this course turns traditional psychology on its head and examines the theories and tenants of positive psychology. As we survey the contributions that positive psychology has made in helping individuals to create change in their lives, we find elevated self-esteem, improved physical well-being, and an increase in the overall sense of success to be achievable outcomes for college students. This class uses the international educational experience as a laboratory, or a practicum, from which students draw a mass of raw experiential and empirical data that will be analyzed with the theoretical and practical tools of the discipline. At the conclusion of the course, students are charged with synthesizing this material and creating their own project to improve mental health awareness within the NYU community exploring the possibilities of their host society.

Sample Syllabus

Cinema Studies

The course is designed as an overview of Argentine Cinema during the last fifty years. The aftermath of World War II, the downfall of Peronist government, and the decline of the studio system produced a series of political, social, and cultural transformations that have been reflected in the films made since then.

In the following years, some facts acquired great importance: the emergence of an independent cinema (on the margins of the industrial system), the connection to other continental cinemas, the relationship with artistic avant-gardes around the world, the experimentation, the social testimony and the political militancy. Cinema is a privileged path to study not only the aesthetic transformations but also the social and political changes at the end of XXth Century.

The syllabus will concentrate on these mutations produced during the second half of the century. Through the study of some representative films by Leopoldo Torre Nilsson, Leonardo Favio, Fernando Solanas, Adolfo Aristarain, Lucrecia Martel, and Juan José Campanella, among others, we will analyze the aesthetic innovations of the so-called Generación del '60; the rise of political cinema at the beginning of the '70s; the complex relationship between films and society during the military dictatorship; and the explosion of the New Argentine cinema in the '90s.

Special attention will be given to certain topics: cinema and avant-garde movements, high culture and mass culture, films as political weapon, and, finally, cinema as a privileged aesthetic witness of historical processes. 

Sample Syllabus

College Core Curriculum

Please be aware that NYU CAS students will be given registration priority for this course.  CAS students will be able to register at their regularuly assigned appointment time. Non-NYU CAS students will be able to register on Friday of registration week.

Over the last 50 years, millions of Latin Americans have experienced extraordinary shifts in their social, political, and cultural landscape, a result of the transformative effects of revolution or insurgency, state repression, popular resistance and social movements. We focus on events that had continental, hemispheric, and even global impact, including the Cuban Revolution of 1959, the military coups of the 1970s, and the Zapatista uprising in 1994. Drawing on a range of primary sources and cultural forms, we listen carefully to the voices of the major social actors of the time. Our sources are drawn from a wide range of media: newsprint, television broadcasts, transcripts, testimony, essay, documentary and feature film, art, and music. We deliberately mix artistic representations with documentary evidence to understand how the arts—music, visual art, literature, film—do not just reflect the reality around them, but are themselves vital sites for shaping and changing that reality and our imagination of it, both then and now.

Creative Writing

This is an introductory course in creative writing: prose is predominant, all genres are accepted, and no previous experience or expertise is required. The thematic focus starts with the condition of being a foreigner abroad, outside of one’s normal context or comfort zone. Many readings and writing exercises draw specifically on being in Buenos Aires and the Latin American region. Both writing exercises and reading combine to motivate and refine students´ work as they expand on the chronicler’s main subjects of place, people, and things.

Grounding one’s writing with fact/verisimilitude is key, as is detailed observation plus awareness of one’s own position in the greater context. Later details involve developing plot and dramatic tension (suspense), using diverse narrative points-of-view, and working with voice and character.

The course allows for flexibility in terms of genre: students may work with poetic discourse or with fiction or with non-fiction and even autobiography. All work will be discussed in accord with the criteria of literary writing (i.e. this is not a “journaling” or “blogging” class); hence, reading as well as writing exercises will focus predominantly on working with language in attentive, even innovative ways.

Critical analysis of published texts and of each others´ work are guided by the instructor to develop knowledge and application of literary critical criteria. The students give opinions and also intuitive sensations about the readings on issues like how a text is working, what strategies it is employing, and what effects it is producing thereby.

Sample Syllabus

Economics

This course is not open to NYU Stern students.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5) or equivalents.

There are two parts to this course. In the first part of the course we will study two of the main financial asset markets: bond markets and stock markets. We will study the concept and determination of interest rates; the risk structure and the term structure of interest rates; stock pricing and the efficient markets hypothesis; cross-border arbitrage. We will also analyze financial structure in Argentina and other Latin American banks.

In the second part of the course we will study the monetary and financial system. We will study how money is created, the tools of monetary policy, the commercial banking industry and its links to monetary policy and the Central Bank, and how monetary policy affects the economy in general. In this part we will also analyze how market failures (such as information asymmetries) and distortionary policies (such as financial repression) may hinder the contribution of financial markets and monetary policy to macroeconomic stability. The roles of state-owned banks in Latin American economies will also be discussed.

Sample Syllabus

 

Gallatin

This course, previously taught in Spanish,  will be taught in English during the Fall 2015 semester.

This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of modern primitive art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in nationalist discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of a primitive and a modern converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Sample Syllabus

Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Please visit the NYU Buenos Aires Internships Page for application information. Intermediate Spanish or above is strongly recommended.

This course requires a 90-minute weekly seminar and a minimum of 10 hours fieldwork a week at an approved internship field site. The seminar is designed to complement your internship fieldwork, exploring many different aspects of your organization and of Argentine Civil Society. Your goal is to finish the semester with an in-depth understanding of your agency. The course provides you with tools to analyze your organization’s approach, its policies, its programs, and the political, legal, social, economic and cultural contexts in which it operates. Guest-speakers are invited to the seminar and case studies on Argentina civil society are discussed.  You will also spend time reflecting on the internship experience itself as a way to better understand your academic, personal, and career goals.

Sample Syllabus

Open to all students at NYU Buenos Aires.  Contact gallatin.global@nyu.edu for information.

This tutorial connects NYU students with students at Lenguitas, a vibrant public high school in Buenos Aires' Retiro neighborhood. NYU students will mentor high school seniors as they read, discuss and write about a well-known literary text. Conducted in English.

This course brings together students in New York and Buenos Aires to examine how urban arts and politics intersect in the Americas: How are art and politics understood and expressed differently and similarly in these two American metropolises and why? How do shared aesthetic features of public art in the city reflect the global circulation of urban creative modes? What do we learn about local politics from looking at the art and writing on a city’s public spaces? Teams of students in both cities will conduct field work in selected neighborhoods to help create an archive of murals, graffiti, performances, and installations. Then, drawing from readings in history, art criticism, and urban studies, as well as from census and electoral data and using GIS technology, we will analyze how social and political processes like gentrification, inequality, and planning generate and reflect creative political expression as captured in our database, culminating in transnational, collaborative projects that explore what the art and writing of city streets reveals about urban life in 21st century America.

Global Liberal Studies

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.  Advanced Spanish skills (beyond Intermediate II) recommended.

This course combines a seminar based weekly section together with intensive internships in businesses, NGOs or other organizations. The experiential part will consist of 10 weekly hours of work within a pre-arranged organization. The academic part is meant to assist students in getting the most from this experience and provide theoretical and methodological elements to critically examine their experiences. It weaves together research design and methods with an empirical and theoretical examination of recent social phenomena in Argentina. We will use selected themes and topics to explore theoretical perspectives and selected aspects of contemporary Argentine society. In parallel we will explore how to construct a research project, collect data and analyze its contents.

Sample Syllabus

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only..  Advanced Spanish skills (beyond Intermediate II) recommended.

This course combines a seminar based weekly section together with intensive internships in businesses, NGOs or other organizations. The experiential part will consist of 10 weekly hours of work within a pre-arranged organization. The academic part is meant to assist students in getting the most from this experience and provide theoretical and methodological elements to critically examine their experiences. It weaves together research design and methods with an empirical and theoretical examination of recent social phenomena in Argentina. We will use selected themes and topics to explore theoretical perspectives and selected aspects of contemporary Argentine society. In parallel we will explore how to construct a research project, collect data and analyze its contents.

Global Public Health

Registration priority for Global Public Health (GPH) courses will be given to NYU GPH majors. Other students will be able to register as space remains available. Please pay close attention to course notes displayed in Albert.

GPH majors and minors interested in fulfilling the Experiential Learning requirement, may apply to participate in the academic internship program.

Epidemiology is the science that studies the distribution and determinants of health and illness in human populations. It is intimately related to public health and policy making, as it provides elemental “information for action”. This course is designed to introduce students to the history, basic principles and methods of epidemiology.

Topics covered in this course are history, background and different perspectives of epidemiology, measures of disease frequency; measures of association; epidemiologic study designs; public health surveillance; outbreak investigations; assessment of causality; and relationship between epidemiology and public health policies. In addition, students are expected to develop skills to critically read, interpret and evaluate health information from published epidemiological studies and mass media sources.

Sample Syllabus

This course introduces students to key concepts in health policy formation, implementation and evaluation in a global context. Using a comparative lens, students explore organization, financing and delivery of health care services and health systems around the world. We examine the role of governmental and non-governmental agencies in delivering care and contributing to a health care infrastructure using case studies and other materials in a comparative approach. Key lessons in the implementation of new health policies and initiatives are explored across the developing world, as well as in a US as students explore health system performance, the quality and cost of care, the management of health care services, the process of health improvement and health reform. The course will use a multidisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economics, and ethical perspectives. The objective is to build an understanding of the fundamental ideas, issues, and problems currently debated in global health policy and management and to provide a foundation for future studies and careers in the global health field. Epidemiology in a Global World and Health and Society in a Global Context are recommended but not required pre-requisites for the course.

Journalism

NYU Media, Culture, & Communication students can take this course for major/minor credit.

In this course students will develop, pitch, research, report, write, edit and present original articles of various kinds on several subjects throughout the semester. Using the city and people of Buenos Aires as their focus, students will work in teams for some projects and individually for others to hone their skills as observers, interviewers, reporters and writers.

Sample Syllabus

Latin American Studies

In the last decade, many Latin American nations have witnessed decisive progress in the legal recognition of non-normative sexualities and gender identities. The conventional map of “advanced democracies” crafting models of democratization to be exported to “less developed” nations seems definitely challenged: a new understanding of the multiple temporalities of queer cultures in North and South America is even more necessary than ever.

In order to explore this multi-layered landscape, this course is aimed at reconstructing the historical detours of queer cultures in Buenos Aires and New York, considered enclaves of queer cultures in Argentina and the US respectively. The course revisits the last three decades in order to question the dominant and frequently reductive narratives of lineal progress. Taught simultaneously in Buenos Aires and New York, the class includes critical readings of queer cultural production as well as work on local archives and interviews with activists and GLTTBI organizations.

This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important problems and debates about Latin American history, society and culture. Latin America is a complex region full of contrasts. Its population is both racially and culturally heterogeneous. Its many countries share some common cultural roots and political origins, but also have distinct histories. The structure of this course is primarily chronological but also thematic. We will start with the Conquest and its legacies and we will end with the problems that we experience today in big cities in Latin America. The course favors a multi-disciplinary approach, and therefore we will use a different array of materials including films, letters, photographs and essays. We will emphasize first hand accounts of the topics we discuss.

Sample Syllabus

This course explores Latin American fiction from a comparative perspective. By analyzing works from Mexico, Cuba, Argentina, Chile, Brazil and the US from the 1960s to the present, students are taught to approach the manifold versions of Latin America fiction through the ways literature has imagined communities beyond national boundaries.

Sample Syllabus

Media, Culture, & Communication

Using a historical perspective, the course aims to acquaint students with Latin American theories, practices and representations of the media. Departing from a critical approach to Habermas theory of the public sphere, the course will trace the arc of the media in Latin America since independence to the incumbent post-neoliberal area and the so-called “Media Wars”. Given that Argentina is facing an extraordinary conflict between the government and the Clarín media conglomerate (the largest of its kind in Latin America), the students will engage in the current incendiary debates about the role of the media, the new media law and the complex relationship between the media, politics and the state.

Sample Syllabus

Metropolitan Studies (Social and Cultural Analysis)

Music

Politics

The course is a historical and a topical approach to the international relations of Latin America.

1) The first section is divided analytically in two:
1.1. The first and briefest is an introduction and an overview to the main theories of international relations: realism, liberalism and constructivism. Theory will provide a common language for the class and patterns to order and interpret reality.


1.2. The second part is historical. We will cover the history of the international system and the history of Latin America, bridging both processes looking for divergences and convergences. We will review the patterns of insertion of Latin America in the broader global system and the influences of the system in the region. We begin at the so called “discovery” and journey through colonial times and the national organization period. Then we go into the XX century and the impact of the World Wars and the Great Depression. After that, the Cold War as the organizing paradigm in world affairs and how it was anything but Cold in Latin America. We then move to the end of the Cold War, the “New World order” and the rise of the neoliberal order. The last period we cover is from 2001 onwards. We will explore the transformations in American foreign policy, the rise of new powers in the world and the backlash against the Washington consensus in the region, the new left and the rise of the merging countries. We conclude by at the same time looking back and ahead. At this stage we will be able to unearth recurrent patterns and identify breaks with the past, always looking for its causes and implications.

2) The second part of the program is topical. We will analyze here the main issues in the international agenda and how are they perceived from Latin America. How are they incorporated into the regional agenda? How and to what extent are they taken into account in the national foreign policies? We will cover a wide array of topics such as poverty, inequality, climate change, terrorism, trafficking, drugs, energy and natural resources. What are the areas of coincidence between the global and the Latin American agenda? What does Latin America bring into the international agenda? We will be examining the mutual interaction and the interdependent effects in the context of globalization.

Sample Syllabus

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