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Course Offerings - Spring 2011

Course content and class availability are subject to change. Issues in modern Argentine and Latin American Cultures (zero to two credits) is a required course for all students. All students are also required to take a Spanish Language course. Regular hours of class time are 9am-7:15pm.

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) - Please note that we are in the process of uploading syllabi and plan to have more available online soon.  In the meantime, if you have an urgent need for a course syllabus, please email global.academics@nyu.edu

Course days/times and registration instructions will be made available closer to registration.  

Fall 2010  |  Spring 2011 | Fall 2011


Spanish Language

Professors Garrido & Molina
This is a one-semester intensive course that covers the equivalent of one year of elementary Spanish (V95.0001 and V95.0002). After completing this course, students who wish to continue studying Spanish must take a qualifying examination. Students who pass the examination may go into V95.0003, which is preparation for V95.0004. Students with high scores on the qualifying exam may enroll in V95.0018 (an accelerated version of V95.0003, which similarly prepares them for V95.0004) or in V95.0020. Completion of either V95.0020 or V95.0004 fulfills the MAP requirement.

Sample Syllabus

Prof. Benedek
Intensive Spanish for Advanced Beginners is a six-credit intensive language course designed to help students with limited knowledge of Spanish strengthen their language skills and develop their cultural competency. The course covers the material of Spanish 2 and Spanish 3 in one semester. Successful completion of this course prepares students for a fourth semester college Spanish language course.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: V95.0010, V95.0002 or equivalents, or passing grade on qualifying examination.

 

Professors Cerqueiras & Dinerstein
Promotes proficiency in reading and writing as well as oral performance. V95.0020 is an intensive intermediate course that covers the equivalent of one year of intermediate Spanish (V95.0003 and V95.0004, or V95.0018 and V95.0004) in one semester.

Sample Syllabus 

Prof. Autieri
Continuation of V95.0003 or V95.0003A. Readings and discussions of contemporary Hispanic texts and review of the main grammatical concepts of Spanish. Completion of this course fulfills the MAP foreign language requirement.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: Intermediate Spanish II (NYU,V95.0004) or equivalent

Prof. Autieri 
Advanced course designed to expand and consolidate lexical and grammatical understanding of the language and to introduce fundamental principles of expository writing as they apply to Spanish, through exercises, readings, and intensive practice of various expository prose techniques and styles. For nonnative speakers only. Prerequisite for NYU students: V95.0020, V95.0004, or permission of the director of undergraduate studies.

Sample Syllabus 

Corequisite: Intensive Intermediate Spanish or Intermediate Spanish II.

Prof.  Luppino
The course is designed for students who want to perfect their Spanish as they expand their knowledge regarding literature, cinema, and social and political problems that exist today within modern Argentine society. The reading of different dramatic texts and viewing of various films throughout the semester will serve to expand lexicon, strengthen grammar and improve the student's style. The objective of this course is that the students familiarize themselves with everyday language of current newspapers and magazines, at the same time as they enter into the world of Spanish literature.

The most important goal of the course is to offer a methodologically simple approximation that helps the student to develop a greater verbal and communicative dexterity. To this end, every week the students will analyze and debate the cultural and literary content texts that are to be studied and every two weeks the students will present a written composition of the topics covered in class. In the classroom linguistic correction will be emphasized along with auditory practice through the use of a wide range of materials and resources: theoretical explanations, comprehension and vocabulary exercises, film viewing, as well as exercises that highlight certain morphological aspects or grammatical usage of Spanish.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students who have completed Advanced Grammar and Composition (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in V95.9100

Prof. Lopez Seoane
This course is an upper-level elective conversation course that introduces students to the porteño dialect, through its peculiar history, literature, and music (tango!), as well as in everyday manifestations, i.e., slang, young people vs. adult argot, different registers, etc. The goal of the course is to improve students’ verbal and communicative dexterity and confidence. Linguistic correction and auditory practice will be used as a general method.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students who have completed Advanced Grammar and Composition (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in V95.9100

Prof. Lopez-Seoane 
Mitos, íconos y tradiciones inventadas is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course will be structured in seven topics; each topic will be covered in two weeks. During these four classes, students will be exposed to different kinds of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and live concerts.

Sample Syllabus 


Courses Taught in Spanish

Art History

Open to students who have completed Advanced Grammar and Composition (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in V95.9100

Art History students: This course counts for Art History Elective Credit.

Prof. M. Penhos
This course will examine key aspects of Latin American art: from the Colonial period to the first decades of 20th Century. By means of an analysis of artistic images from México, Perú, Brasil and Argentina, we will discuss the role of visual representation in the conquest and colonization of territory in Latin America, and later in the construction and consolidation of national states and regional identities. Combining guided visits to museums in Buenos Aires with class instruction, students will have the opportunity to learn about artistic languages, techniques, iconography, systems of production, and some issues of Latin American history.

Sample Syllabus 


Creative Writing

A Spanish taught section of this course is currently under development for spring 2011

A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Sample Syllabus 


Cinema Studies

Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU,V95.0100 or equivalent)

 

Prof. Mestman
El curso recorre algunos momentos significativos del cine de América Latina desde sus orígenes hasta los nuevos cines contemporáneos. En cada clase se analizará un período histórico relevante en relación con algún aspecto de la actividad cinematográfica: la “época de oro”, la consolidación y desarrollo de los géneros; la propaganda estatal referida a los logros sociales o los programas de desarrollo y modernización económica; las influencias externas (el neorrealismo italiano); los diversos tipos de realismo latinoamericano; las escuelas documentales; el lugar del autor; el movimiento del cinema novo brasileño; el cine, los intelectuales y la política en torno al 68; las denuncias y las memorias respecto de las dictaduras militares del Cono Sur; los nuevos cines brasileño, mexicano y argentino desde los años noventa.

Sample Syllabus 


Gallatin

Both English and Spanish sections of this course will be offered. For Spanish section: Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU,V95.0100 or equivalent)

 

Prof. Dieleke
This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of “modern primitive” art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in national(ist) discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of “primitive” and “modern” converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Sample Syllabus 



History

Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU,V95.0100 or equivalent)

 

Prof. Serulnikov
The history of Argentina is one of contrast and paradox. It began as an inhospitable region on the fringes of the Spanish Empire, turned into one of the wealthiest and most cosmopolitan countries in the world by the late 19th century, became the scenario of the largest populist movement in Latin America under the sway of Juan D. Perón and Evita Perón, to descend into protracted economic decline and military dictatorships for most of the 20th century. This introductory course is aimed at offering a comprehensive overview of this historical trajectory. Topics will include the crisis of the Spanish colonial rule; the rise of rural caudillos; the nation-state building process and the country’s consolidation as one of the major breadbaskets of the world in the late 19th century; the birth of Buenos Aires as a great cosmopolitan city; the emergence of Peronism; the politics of military rule and human right protests in the 1970s; and the transition to democracy. Student will have the opportunity to delve into Argentina’s past and culture from different perspectives: politics, gender and race relations, mass migration, the origins of tango, urban history, and social movements.

Sample Syllabus 


Latin American & Spanish Studies

This course will be required of all students, beginning in Fall 2010.

Prof. Fernandez-Bravo
During the semester the NYU Buenos Aires Center will host a series of lectures by notable people from various walks of life and different perspectives speaking on a range of issues related to Latin America. These talks and students’ interactions with the speakers are meant to expand and deepen students’ appreciation of the rich social and cultural landscapes of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and beyond. Some field excursions will also be included in the course.

About half the talks will be given in Spanish and half in English. Students will be required to attend a certain number of lectures and complete participatory projects or other assignments.

Students wishing to take this course for Major or Minor Credit in Latin American Studies or Spanish must register under the V95.9762 number. Students from both sections will attend English lectures together, but those registered under V95.9762 will recieve enhanced reading and writing assignments in Spanish.

Prof. Fiorucci
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important problems and debates about Latin American history, society and culture. Latin America is a complex region full of contrasts. Its population is both racially and culturally heterogeneous. Its many countries share some common cultural roots and political origins, but also have distinct histories. The structure of this course is primarily chronological but also thematic. We will start with the Conquest and its legacies and we will end with the problems that we experience today in big cities in Latin America. The course favors a multi-disciplinary approach, and therefore we will use a different array of materials including films, letters, photographs and essays. We will emphasize first hand accounts of the topics we discuss.

Sample Syllabus 

Prerequisite: V95.0100 or equivalent, or with permission of program director.

 

Prof. Lopez Seoane
Introduction to literary analysis through close reading of texts from the early to modern periods of peninsular Spanish and Spanish American literatures. Engages students in the practice of textual explication, provides basic critical skills, and encourages reflection on literature as a system. This course is the gateway course for students interested in pursuing advanced literature courses in Spanish. With very few exceptions, students must have completed Critical Approaches before taking advanced literature courses taught in Spanish.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students who have completed Advanced Grammar and Composition (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in V95.9100

Prof. Lopez-Seoane 
Mitos, íconos y tradiciones inventadas is an advanced conversation course, which seeks to make students familiar with the rich and complex history of Latin America through the study of some of its most known and iconic cultural expressions. It does also work as an introductory map to the most influential and widespread approaches in Latin American social sciences, cultural studies and literary criticism. Thus, students will not only have a first encounter with key historical processes that lie behind some well know cultural icons, but also will be introduced to arguments and ways of writing that help constitute modern Latin American educated Spanish. The course will be structured in seven topics; each topic will be covered in two weeks. During these four classes, students will be exposed to different kinds of cultural materials, including literary texts, film, papers from several disciplines, theater plays, art shows and live concerts.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students who have completed Advanced Grammar and Composition (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in V95.9100

Prof. Lopez Seoane
This course is an upper-level elective conversation course that introduces students to the porteño dialect, through its peculiar history, literature, and music (tango!), as well as in everyday manifestations, i.e., slang, young people vs. adult argot, different registers, etc. The goal of the course is to improve students’ verbal and communicative dexterity and confidence. Linguistic correction and auditory practice will be used as a general method.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students who have completed Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in V95.9200

Prof. Fernandez Bravo
This course explores writings on Latin America from the Conquest to the present and the representation of the region in literature in a broad sense. We will pay attention to images that emphasize the extraordinary and the ordinary, drawing comparisons between Latin America and Europe and North America, examining accounts of first contact with the new world, and reading descriptions of the social and natural world. Writers and travelers wondered about the identity and particular features of local cultures and produced works where this inquiry can be examined. Often associated with the supernatural and the sublime, Latin America was also depicted in its everyday life (the common) that unfolded along side Revolutions, political violence, and natural beauty. By contrasting the ordinary and the extraordinary the course sheds light on different images of the region. Readings include letters by Cristóbal Colón and Hernán Cortés, poems by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, as well as works by Alexander Von Humboldt, Simon Bolívar, Alejo Carpentier, Esteban Echeverría, Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, Rubén Darío, Juan Carlos Onetti, Roberto Arlt, Clarice Lispector, Juan Rulfo, and Mario Levrero. Films and visual arts will also be part of the material examined in the course.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: Advanced Grammar & Composition and Critical Approaches, (NYU,V95.0100, V95.0200) or equivalent.

Prof. Amante
The course is designed to introduce students to the work of Jorge Luis Borges, one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. Through reading, analysis, and discussion of short fiction or poems and critical bibliography, the students will examine the dichotomy civilization-barbarism in Borges works (in connection to the Argentine cultural tradition since nineteenth century); some key topics in his texts such as tigers, labyrinths and libraries; the relationship between writing and translation (specifically in the English translations of his fictions); the political aspects of the literature produced by Borges and other contemporary Argentine writers on Eva Perón. The course will also develop the connections between Borges and other contemporary Argentine writers.

Sample Syllabus 

Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU,V95.0100 or equivalent)

Prof. Alabarces
This course rests on two assumptions: the first, that a culture can be analyzed choosing some privileged texts (from literature, cinema, popular music) and reading in them the interplay of representations and power relationships: what a culture says and represents in a specific moment and in a specific way. The second, that the gaucho in the XIX century; a poor inmigrant at the beginning of the last one; a peronist worker; Maradona; a football gang; rock musicians and cumbia dancers; all of them can be used to “explain” a Nation –Argentina, in this case– in deeper ways than official texts, statistics or history handbooks. Therefore, this proposal has two parts: 1) histories and 2) presents. The ten first meetings propose a history of the construction of popular culture within the general frame of Argentine culture, following a diachronical path that allows us to understand the (violent) invention of our object between the XIX and XX centuries. The last meetings are dedicated to an analysis of the present: from dictatorship to present day, discussing the object as well as the theories that frame it.

Sample Syllabus 

Open to students who have completed Critical Approaches (or equivalent), or to students enrolled concurrently in V95.9200

Prof. Kamenzain
La literatura del siglo XX se caracterizó por poner el foco en el yo del escritor. Ya sea para ocultarlo, para mostrarlo tímidamente o para exhibirlo sin prejuicios, lo cierto es que el yo se transformó en el protagonista de los cambios literarios que apuntan al siglo XXI. Este fenómeno, que se produce tanto en la poesía como en la narrativa y en el teatro, permite el surgimiento de formas que antes carecían de prestigio literario, como el diario íntimo, las crónicas y, contemporáneamente, el blog. Este curso se propone analizar el recorrido de estas verdaderas transformaciones subjetivas, en relación directa con los contextos histórico-sociales en los que se producen. Para esto se trabajarán textos narrativos y poéticos de diversos escritores latinoamericanos contemporáneos. Además, con el fin de lograr un contacto vivo con los materiales a trabajar, se alternarán los contenidos curriculares con visitas a diversos eventos literarios que tengan relación con el programa, y también se invitará a algunos de los escritores estudiados a participar de las clases.

Sample Syllabus 

Corequisite: Intensive Intermediate Spanish or Intermediate Spanish II.

Prof.  Luppino
The course is designed for students who want to perfect their Spanish as they expand their knowledge regarding literature, cinema, and social and political problems that exist today within modern Argentine society. The reading of different dramatic texts and viewing of various films throughout the semester will serve to expand lexicon, strengthen grammar and improve the student's style. The objective of this course is that the students familiarize themselves with everyday language of current newspapers and magazines, at the same time as they enter into the world of Spanish literature.

The most important goal of the course is to offer a methodologically simple approximation that helps the student to develop a greater verbal and communicative dexterity. To this end, every week the students will analyze and debate the cultural and literary content texts that are to be studied and every two weeks the students will present a written composition of the topics covered in class. In the classroom linguistic correction will be emphasized along with auditory practice through the use of a wide range of materials and resources: theoretical explanations, comprehension and vocabulary exercises, film viewing, as well as exercises that highlight certain morphological aspects or grammatical usage of Spanish.

Sample Syllabus 

Music

Both an English and Spanish section of this course will be offered.
For Spanish section: Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU,V95.0100 or equivalent)

Prof. Raffo
This course is a journey through the different styles of Latin American Folk and Popular Music (LAFM), particularly those coming from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. Their roots, influences and characteristics. Their social and historical context. Their uniqueness and similarities. Emphasis in the rhythmic aspect of folk music as a foundation for dance and as a resource of cultural identity. The irruption of Latin American rhythms in the music market through the “World Music” phenomenon. Even though there is no musical prerequisite, the course is recommended for students with any kind and/or level of musical experience

Sample Syllabus 

Service Learning

Tentative, under development

Students enrolled in the service learning course will intern with a local organization for approximately 10 hours a week and attend a weekly seminar. This course is currently under development. Complete course description coming soon. 


Courses Taught in English

Cinema Studies (Tisch School of the Arts)

Prof. Oubiña
A survey of anticolonialist cinema with special emphasis on Latin America. Despite conditions of economic and political oppression, Latin America has managed in recent years to forge a dynamically original cinema. After studying some European films that highlight the colonial background of current struggles in the world, we take a brief look at African cinema and then look closely at Latin American cinema, with films from Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Cuba. The emphasis throughout is on a common theme – the struggle against foreign domination and on the search for an authentic, innovative national cinematic style.

Sample Syllabus 

Creative Writing

Prof. Stahl
A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Sample Syllabus 

Economics

NOTE: This course does not count for NYU Economics major credit.

Prof. G. Sanchez
The course offers an introduction to Argentina’s economic performance through time and its current economic issues. There are four parts, each with a separate aim. Part I (5 weeks) introduces from scratch some notions in the field of “open economy macroeconomics”, useful to understand Argentina but also other relatively small economies open to trade and capital flows. The effects of internal or external shocks are quite different in these countries compared to larger economies such as the US or Europe, and require a special understanding. Part II (5 weeks) presents an outline of Argentina’s modern economic history, with three subperiods: export led growth (1850-1930), inward looking industrialization (1930-1975) and re-globalization (1976-2007). Part III (2 weeks) searches for explanations of Argentina’s economic performance, including the effects of external shocks, institutions, trade policy, macroeconomic crises and Argentina’s political economy. Argentina’s he comparative performance of other countries, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Mexico and the US. Finally, Part IV (2 weeks) deals with some current economic issues, including income distribution, inflation, fiscal policy and economic volatility

Sample Syllabus 

Gallatin

Prof. Stahl
A practical course in the writing of creative literary texts: prose (short stories as well as literary non-fiction) and poetry. Selected published works will be analyzed in class both to provide inspiration for student writing as well as to represent literary structures and strategies. Writing assignments ranging from spontaneous to long-term projects will promote creative exploration and self-expression. Critical skills are emphasized and enhanced as students respond to each others’ work. Awareness of correct conventional use of the English language will be upheld. Students build up a body of work over the semester. For full credit and in demonstration of a writing “process,” the final portfolios should include both first drafts and subsequent revisions. At least one longer text (or set of poems) will be selected for submission as would be appropriate to publishers or literary contests.

Sample Syllabus 

Both English and Spanish sections of this course will be offered. For Spanish section: Advanced Spanish language skills required. (NYU,V95.0100 or equivalent)

Prof. Dieleke
This course explores Tango as an aesthetic, social and cultural formation that is articulated in interesting and complex ways with the traditions of culture and politics in Argentina and Latin America more generally. During the rapid modernization of the 1920s and 1930s, Tango (like Brazilian Samba), which had been seen as a primitive and exotic dance, began to emerge as a kind of “modern primitive” art form that quickly came to occupy a central space in national(ist) discourse. The course explores the way that perceptions of “primitive” and “modern” converge in this unique and exciting art. In addition, the course will consider tango as a global metaphor with deeply embedded connections to urban poverty, social marginalization, and masculine authority.

Sample Syllabus 

Latin American Studies

This course will be required of all students, beginning in Fall 2010.

Prof. Fernandez-Bravo
During the semester the NYU Buenos Aires Center will host a series of lectures by notable people from various walks of life and different perspectives speaking on a range of issues related to Latin America. These talks and students’ interactions with the speakers are meant to expand and deepen students’ appreciation of the rich social and cultural landscapes of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and beyond. Some field excursions will also be included in the course.

About half the talks will be given in Spanish and half in English. Students will be required to attend a certain number of lectures and complete participatory projects or other assignments.

Students wishing to take this course for Major or Minor Credit in Latin American Studies or Spanish must register under the V95.9762 number. Students from both sections will attend English lectures together, but those registered under V95.9762 will recieve enhanced reading and writing assignments in Spanish.

Prof. Fiorucci
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important problems and debates about Latin American history, society and culture. Latin America is a complex region full of contrasts. Its population is both racially and culturally heterogeneous. Its many countries share some common cultural roots and political origins, but also have distinct histories. The structure of this course is primarily chronological but also thematic. We will start with the Conquest and its legacies and we will end with the problems that we experience today in big cities in Latin America. The course favors a multi-disciplinary approach, and therefore we will use a different array of materials including films, letters, photographs and essays. We will emphasize first hand accounts of the topics we discuss.

Sample Syllabus 

Prof. Schettini
This course explores Latin American fiction from a comparative perspective. By analyzing works from Peru, Argentina, Mexico, Chile and Brazil from the 1970s to the present, students approach the manifold versions of Latin America fiction and the way literature has imagined communities beyond national boundaries.

Sample Syllabus

Media, Culture, & Communication (The Steinhardt School)

Prof. Duek
This course proposes a historical and cultural approach to the development of the popular press, cinema, radio, television and the contemporary processes of the new media. There is a central question for the course: Is there any singularity in Latin American media? The answer assumes that there is a specific relation between tradition and modernity in Latin American societies with many consequences for mass culture and media. The constitution of mass audiences in societies where literacy was not a universal value, made significant the development of audiovisual media. The course will focus on melodrama as a configuration that made possible the emergence of specific genres in Latin American cinema, radio and television. Particularly, the “telenovela” is simultaneously an aesthetic, industrial and audience phenomenon with local and global circulation. Finally, the course will discuss the role of media in dictatorship and democratic processes. Censorship and alternative media enabled many different practices for radio journalists, filmmakers or contemporary bloggers.

Sample Syllabus 

Music

Both an English and Spanish section of this course will be offered.

Professor Raffo
This course is a journey through the different styles of Latin American Folk and Popular Music (LAFM), particularly those coming from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. Their roots, influences and characteristics. Their social and historical context. Their uniqueness and similarities. Emphasis in the rhythmic aspect of folk music as a foundation for dance and as a resource of cultural identity. The irruption of Latin American rhythms in the music market through the “World Music” phenomenon. Even though there is no musical prerequisite, the course is recommended for students with any kind and/or level of musical experience

Sample Syllabus 

Politics

Prof. Gonzalez
This course offers an introduction to the study of U.S.-Latin American relations. It draws on the theory and history of international politics to shed light on the roots and contemporary dynamics of the complex and often uneasy coexistence between the two poles of the Western Hemisphere. After an overview of the main theoretical perspectives within the field of international relations that can be used to understand the nature of the inter-American system, the course devotes five classes to trace the historical interaction between the United States and its southern neighbors. These classes seek to explain the intertwining between the policies of a rising great power – and, since 1945, an established superpower – towards what it rapidly came to define as its natural sphere of influence, on the one hand, and the diverse strategies employed by the Latin American nations to deal with the continental power asymmetry, on the other. Special attention will be paid to the political, military, economic and ideological dimensions of the resulting relationship, and a distinction will be made between three historical phases: pre-Cold War, Cold War and post-Cold War.

The rest of the seminar focuses on the latter period to capture the central processes and key issue-areas of current U.S.-Latin American relations. It looks in detail at five elements of the post-1990 regional agenda: the principle of collective defense of democracies; the so-called “transnational” threats and their centrality to the hemispheric security dialogue; the international political economy of trade, finance and competing regional integration projects; the institution of the Organization of American States (OAS); and the political challenges to Washington’s hegemony. Case studies – the 2009 coup in Honduras, the “war on drugs” in Colombia and its repercussions in Bolivia and Mexico, the 2001 financial collapse in Argentina, the Venezuela-Nicaragua-Cuba “anti-imperialist triangle”, the rise of Brazil, and the increasing Chinese presence in Latin America – are used to illustrate the multifaceted and evolving nature of inter-American relations at the dawn of the twenty-first century.

Sample Syllabus 

Sociology

Prof. De Santos
Globalization refers to diverse social, economic, political, and cultural changes that are remaking the contemporary world. Nations are increasingly interconnected by flows of goods, capital, information, discourses, and people. Multinational corporations, transnational organizations and social movements have grown in size, reach and complexity. This course provides an overview of these and other processes and their consequences, drawing on theoretical ideas from sociology and related fields and focusing on case studies throughout Latin America. 

Some of the topics covered include: the spread of neoliberalism throughout the world and Latin America and how it reshaped economic policies (trade, finance, the role of the state in the economy); poverty and inequality in the globalizing world; the cultural dimensions of globalization examining the meaningful texture of global commodities, brands and consumption practices; the development of global civil society, global media, and transnational social movements; patterns and causes of migration and transnational communities; and the effects of globalization on the environment.

Sample Syllabus 

Service Learning

Tentative, under development

Students enrolled in the service learning course will intern with a local organization for approximately 10 hours a week and attend a weekly seminar. This course is currently under development. Complete course description coming soon. 

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