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Courses - Spring 2014

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) For sample syllabi or academic questions, please email global.academics@nyu.edu.

A list of all courses offered at the Global Academic Centers, organized by department, can be found here.

Spring 2014 courses are now availble in Albert, NYU's Student Information System. Directions on how to view Study Away courses in Albert, and other Registration FAQs can be found here.


Academic Requirements & Registration Guidelines

  • Students must register for 12-18 credits
  • All students will take Global Orientations - a zero credit pass/fail course. Students will be enrolled by Global Programs during registration week.
  • Enrollment in a German Language course is required; select one that matches your skill level. If you are an advanced German student, please contact nyu.in.berlin@nyu.edu
  • Language courses cannot be taken pass/fail
  • Attendance is expected and required; absences will negatively affect grades
  • Before you plan your personal travel, check your syllabi! Academic site visits and field trips are considered required class time.
  • Some Art courses are restricted to Steinhardt Studio Art majors only until Friday of registration week. Other students will be able to register beginning Friday.
  • If you're wait-listing, don't forget to Swap. More information on wait-listing is available here.
  • More information about Registering for Study Away Courses and registration FAQ's is available here.
  • If you have trouble finding a course on Albert or encounter problems, email global.academics@nyu.edu

Spring 2014 | Fall 2014 | Spring 2015 | Fall 2015 | Spring 2016   

 

Required Course for All Students

This course offers a survey of Modern Germany (its history, politics and culture) and an investigation of how Germany's past, always very present, shapes responses to contemporary challenges and new opportunities. The overview investigates not only the country's experiments with authoritarianism - the experiences of mass murder, war and division - but also its emergence as a democratic leader, in the arts and human rights, and as Europe's power broker. We examine questions of citizenship and diversity, Germany's 'special' responsibility as a leader in Europe, the role of the Holocaust in State governance, Berlin's status and development as an industrial and cosmpolitan metropolis, and new avenues for German identity. We ask how these histories have made today's Berlin Europe's most exciting capital - a nexus of youth culture and the interational arts scene - and Germany a vanguard of the arts, sustainable energy, technical development and global politics.

Sample Syllabus

 


German Language

All students are required to take a German language course (or course taught in German) for graded credit.  (This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail).

This is an introductory course to the language and culture of German-speaking countries for students with no knowledge of German. It focuses on the development of communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The textbook "Schritte International 1&2", in conjunction with current culture-rich supplemental materials, offers a balanced approach to developing your individual language competence.

Throughout your engagement with the German language you will also learn about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the first part of a four part German course. Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking  countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

This course continues your introduction to the language and everyday culture of German-speaking countries. You will expand your understanding of important vocabulary and customs as well as more advanced language structures and idioms. The focus of the course will continue to spoken communication and everyday language use, but there will also be increased attention to reading and writing assignments. Since the goals of communicative and grammatical competence are ultimately inseparable,students are guided towards using German as accurately as possible.

This course covers the second part of a four part German course. Together, these courses (Elementary I and II and Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

This is an intensive introductory course to the language and culture of German-speaking countries for students with no knowledge of German. The focus of the course will be on communication with emphasis on the use of German in real-life situations, as well as providing knowledge of grammar and vocabulary. At the end of the semester, students will have acquired all the skills usually obtained in the two semesters of Elementary German sequence.

Your engagement with German language will also include learning about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the first two parts of a four part German course. Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of one year of elementary language instruction and to others on assignment by placement examination.

The first intermediate course stresses the acquisition and practice of more sophisticated written and spoken German. The focus is on expanding conversational skills, but the course also includes guided composition practice, vocabulary work, and grammar review. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: GERM-UA 9003, Intermediate German I or equivalent.

Intermediate German II is the second part of a two semester intermediate sequence. You will continue to study grammar, vocabulary and other aspects of language. You will also learn about the cultural and historical context of the German language. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening. This course intends to create a balance between working with intellectually stimulating subjects and practicing the skills needed to communicate in a foreign language.

This course covers the fourth part of a four part German course. Together, these courses (Elementary I and II and Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that will enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work.

Sample Syllabus

In this intensive intermediate course you will continue to study grammar,vocabulary and other aspects of language. You will also learn about the cultural and historical context of the German language. The class is taught entirely in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening. This course intends to create a balance between working with intellectually stimulating subjects and practicing the skills needed to communicate in a foreign language.
Throughout your engagement with the German language you will also learn about Berlin and the Federal Republic of Germany today. In addition to language instruction, the course offers a rich cultural program that includes visits to famous museums and places in Berlin. These visits and field trips are closely related to the subjects taught in class and will help you utilize your knowledge outside the classroom.

This course covers the second two parts of a four part German course.Together these courses (Elementary I and II; Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiency in German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work. At the end of Intensive Intermediate you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus


Courses Taught in German

Conducted in German. Postintermediate - 100 level.

Conversation & Composition is designed for post-Intermediate students of German with a solid grasp of German grammar and vocabulary, who wish to extend their knowledge of the German language, history, and culture through reading, watching films, discussion, and writing. Conversation & Composition is a reading and writing intensive course. Emphasis will be placed on refining written expression and developing the ability to express, discuss, and argue opinions.
This course will give you an overview of recent German political, social and cultural history after 1945 and of the present. Focuses will be on the variant developments in East and West Germany until the fall of the wall and on life in Berlin today. What are the important incidents and changes in German culture and society after 1945? How has the city of Berlin developed since the fall of the wall? These, and similar questions, will accompany us throughout the semester. During the course of the semester, we will explore narratives, which are related to our topics from a variety of genres: narrative prose, newspaper/magazine article, TV/radio documentary, music, film, photo, and other visual material. The class is entirely taught in German and emphasizes the language skills necessary to communicate effectively in a foreign language – speaking, reading, viewing, writing, and listening.

Sample Syllabus

Conducted in German. Postintermediate - 100 level.

Der Kurs führt in die Geschichte der deutschen Literatur vom 18. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart ein. Anhand repräsentativer Werke vermittelt er einen Überblick über die verschiedenen Epochen und Gattungen, erste literaturwissenschaftliche Fachbegriffe werden erläutert. Kontinuitäten und Brüche, die als signifikante Entwicklungslinien oder Zäsuren die Literaturgeschichte markieren, werden im historischen und gesellschaftlichen Zusammenhang diskutiert. Der Kurs wird durchgängig in deutscher Sprache unterrichtet.
Es ist das Ziel, in gemeinsamen close readings a) ein Verständnis für die jeweiligen Texte und ihre politischen, kulturellen und sozialen Kontexte zu erarbeiten und b) die Fähigkeit zur wissenschaftlichen Diskussion zu entwickeln. Gefördert wird dies auch durch kleinere spielerische Ein-heiten, in denen wir die Texte in die Gegenwart transferieren und so nach der Aktualität der Werke fragen.

The course provides an introduction into the history of German Literature from the 18th century until today. By reading representative texts, the student will receive an overview of various epochs and genres. In addition, basic terminology of literary studies will be explained. Continuities and disruptions, which influence the history of literature in significant ways, are discussed in their historical and social contexts. The class is taught entirely in German.
The course objectives are a) to develop an understanding of the texts and their political, cultural, and social contexts and b) to develop an ability of critical discussion through a close reading of literary works. This is also fostered by some playful teaching units, in which we transfer the texts into the present and investigate their current relevance.

Sample Syllabus

Conducted in German. Advanced - 300 level.

Im Mittelpunkt des Seminars stehen kulturhistorische Reflexionen des 20.
Jahrhunderts in Kunst und Literatur. Es versteht sich als Überblick und setzt Schwerpunkte in der Kultur-, Literatur- und Kunstgeschichte Deutschlands. So betrachten wir nicht nur verschiedene Epochen der Moderne wie Naturalismus, Dadaismus und Neue Sachlichkeit, sondern setzen uns auch mit epochemachenden Künstlern und Autoren sowie den verschiedenen Wegen, die die Kunst und Literatur in BRD und DDR, einschlägt, auseinander.

Kulturhistorisch betrachten wir Deutschland als Land, das mit der Industrialisierung Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts bis heute vielen Veränderungen ausgesetzt war.Gleichzeitig analysieren wir die Stadt Berlin als Topos in der Kunst und als Ort, wo Kunst stattfindet vom Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts bis zur Gegenwart. Wie wird die Stadt als Ort wahrgenommen und rezipiert? Was für eine (symbolische) Bedeutung wird der Stadt angetragen und welche Rückschlüsse lassen sich auf das kulturelle

Selbstbild der Menschen ziehen? Was ist das für eine Kunst, die in Deutschland und Berlin entsteht und in welchem Verhältnis steht sie zur Stadt/ zur deutschen Geschichte?
Einige Seminartermine finden in verschiedenen Berliner Museen statt. Dabei geht es nicht nur darum, eine fundierte Kenntnis der originalen Objekte zu erwerben, sondern auch die sachgerechte Beschreibung und Grundlagen der wissenschaftlichen Objektanalyse zu trainieren. Die Arbeit vor Originalen versteht sich auch als Voraussetzung eines umfassenden Verständnisses der Bezüge zwischen Literatur und Bildender Kunst und damit der deutschen Kulturgeschichte.

Sample Syllabus


Art and Arts Professions

The course, ‘Image and Process’ will examine the relationship between image,
made by camera and other photographic means, and process, whereby a
transformation occurs and ideas, both formal and conceptual emerge. Berlin,
a city in constant transformation itself, offers an enormous variety of sites and
layers of history, providing locations and ambience for both an environmental
as well as personal investigation into identity. The emphasis of the course will
be on learning to see and to develop one’s own personal viewpoint.

Sample Syllabus

This course will likely carry a supplies & studio fee for all non-Steinhardt Studio Art majors. More details will be available soon.

Sound art is perhaps the multidisciplinary art par excellence. Eluding most attempts at tidy classification, sound art can share formal elements and concerns with traditional sculpture, film and video, performance art, conceptual art, architecture, installation, and of course with music. This studio course will explore sound across its many and sometimes contradictory vectors, allowing students intensive work on sounds and their composition, as well as on projects that explore the broad and rich interaction of sound with other disciplines of art.

There are two main tenets of the course. The first is that issues fundamental to sound art engage some of the key problems of modern and contemporary art. Rather than viewing sound as a peripheral practice, we will see how it has been decisive in the narrative of 20th and 21st century art, exciting many of the key debates that carry through to this day. The second principle is that listening, or careful observation, can be primary in the creative process, coming before expression. From John Cage onward, the value of listening, of observation as a primary creative act, has re-attuned many strains of western art (from conceptual, minimal, and land art to media and installation art) to new ideas of process, complexity, and ecology.

This course can be approached from any level of experience. No previous work with sound or with digital media is required, only a willingness to explore the boundaries of art-making that is a natural outgrowth of working with sound as an artistic medium.

Sample Syllabus

This course will carry a supplies & studio fee for all non-Steinhardt Studio Art majors. More details will be available soon.

Intended for Studio Art students to work on projects over the course of the semester under the guidance of an artist mentor.

Sample Syllabus

Museums mount blockbuster shows. Rappers shoot videos in art galleries. Biennials
proliferate, art fairs geographically expand, and auction sales hit new records. At the
same time, public arts funding is systematically slashed, emerging artists still struggle,
and art criticism remains in its perpetual crisis. The international contemporary art
world is a convoluted interplay of aesthetics and economics; ego and idealism. Berlin’s
art world may be more production-based and experimental than the art scenes of other
major western cities, but it is still a microcosm of larger movements.
Through readings of art theory and criticism, discussions, site visits, guest speakers,
and short- and long-form response writing, this course offers an overview of the
conventions, trends, history, current developments and myriad structures and
substructures of the contemporary art world in general and Berlin’s in particular. The
course delves into contemporary art’s current prevailing discourse via methodological
analysis, practical observation, and input from professionals currently working in the
art’s institutional and commercial sectors. It also offers a critical look at how these
larger art-world structures translate to Berlin.

Sample Syllabus


Art History

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar.

Section A

Berlin is a unique modern Metropolis, its alternating history with often-drastic changes
offers a comprehensive background to explore and investigate the nature of
architecture in correlation to the various development processes of urban culture and life.
Architecture is embedded in the urban fabric for which place and time serve as main
threads, constantly changing their multifaceted and layered relationships. This urban
fabric provides the fertile soil for urban culture and life, which literally takes place in various scales
between the public and the private realm, two more threads intertwined to the urban fabric.
Experiencing the city through walking, is essential for learning how to observe, see
and read, "Place, Building and Time" in Berlin.
Tours will alternate with classroom discussions and workshops.

Sample Syllabus A

 

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar.

The course is a mixture of classroom discussions and field trips (in conjunction with discussions in rooms provided by the National Museums of Berlin) to different museums in Berlin, with a focus on the five major museums on the Museum Island, which have been build over a period of 100 years (1830-1930). We will also talk about the newest addition to the Museumsinsel, the Humboldt Forum scheduled to open its doors in the reconstructed city palace on the Schlossplatz in 2019. Discussions will focus on the nature and social function of museums as well as their role as places where the image of the state and its civil society are constantly reshaped, until the era of global migration. Other topics include museums architecture, museum and identity, museum and education, museum and the 21st century. Previous knowledge of art history, architecture, or German history is not required, but useful.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

This survey course analyzes the ways that our social and ecological worlds intersect.Through an exploration of historical and contemporary debates, we will consider how ideas about the "environment" and "society" - and the relationship between the two - are the products of socio-cultural, economic, and political processes. We will also consider the ways in which material conditions guide and constrain social life, from natural resources to disease. Fundamentally, students will learn to apply social scientific insights in order to theorize "environment" and "society" (or nature-culture) as inseparable and mutually constitutive, rather than opposed and mutually exclusive.

Sample Syllabus

The course gives an introduction to various aspects of EU environmental policy making and policy implementation. After a brief recap of the basics of policy making in the EU, students will learn about the guiding principles and developments within EU environmental policy, the main actors and their interests in and influence on policy making. An optional part of the course might be a visit to the European House of the European Commission (EC) in Berlin where students either have the opportunity to role-play the decision-making process of the EC on the introduction of CO2-standards for cars or to engage in a debate with an EC representative. The second half of the course analyses EU environmental policies in different issue areas (e.g. climate change, biodiversity, waste) for their effectiveness in solving environmental problems. Different policy instruments are discussed for their merits and shortcomings (one example will be the EU Emissions Trading System) and linkages to other issue areas of EU policy making (e.g. industry and agriculture) are discussed. Finally, the course provides an international perspective on EU environmental policy making: sessions will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of EU environmental policy making at home and in international negotiations, compare it with US environmental politics, and discuss future challenges (e.g. EU enlargement) and trends for EU environmental governance.

Sample Syllabus

Comprehensive examination of Berlin’s urban ecology and urban planning approaches, introducing their history, and the correlations between the city’s built structure, urban nature and culture. Combination of lectures, workshops and site visits to several facets of Berlin’s ‘green’ past and present.

Investigation of Berlin’s ‘green’ structures in relation to the economic, socio-cultural, and political processes that shape it with an emphasis on sustainable ideas and projects and how they influence Berlin’s built structure.

Reading-intensive course; meets for 2,5 hours per week.

Sample Syllabus


European Studies

This course aims to provide an overview of the history, structure, functions, processes
and current issues of European integration with a particular emphasis on the role of
Germany both as to its influence on the EU and the Europeanisation of its own political
system.
European Integration is understood in this course to mean the co-operation, which EU
Member states organize in the framework of the Union, and the direction in which this
co-operation evolves. For these twenty-eight diverse countries, integration constitutes
an increasingly essential component and extension of their own state structure. It
permits them to conceive of, to decide on, and to carry out a growing number of
important state tasks in common, and under the roof of the European Union.
You will consider the milestones of postwar European integration. You will analyze the
institutions, procedures and instruments of European integration as well as major EU
policies and the distribution of competencies between Member States and Union. And
you will get acquainted with theoretical models to explain the nature of European
integration up to the present.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

The course examines significant moments in the development of Europe’s and America’s notions
and images of one another from the 18th century to the present. The in-depth discussion
will be based upon historical documents and cultural texts with equal attention to sources
from America/the US and Europe/Germany in an effort to explore and evaluate the major
theoretical and rhetorical paradigms (and the shifts therein) informing the perceptions as well
as cultural constructions of the “other” past and present. Moreover, the course will investigate
and evaluate recent manifestations of Anti-Americanism and analyse the ideo-logical and
cultural coordinates of current anti-American concepts in Europe/Germany as well as concepts
of Europe as a socio-cultural model for the 21st century. In conclusion, the politics of the
current US-Administration will be discussed in terms of their impact on transatlantic relations
as well as on dealing with global challenges, particularly in the Middle East.

Sample Syllabus


Gallatin

From its beginnings, cinema in Germany was embroiled in heated debates about its
aesthetic, social and political value: Is cinema a form of art or mere entertainment for
the masses? And what does it mean to be a work of art? What is its significance as
popular medium? Film’s relevance reaches far beyond the worlds it depicts on
screen. It is intrinsically linked to questions of German identity and self-perception.
This course provides an overview of the changing roles of cinema in the turbulent
history of the 20th century in Germany as they manifests in changing visions of the
city. The course aims to give some insight into the competing ideas of intellectual
histories and evaluate them from the angle of the visual medium and to thus offer
insight in the construction of German identity.

Sample Syllabus

The course gives an introduction to various aspects of EU environmental policy making and policy implementation. After a brief recap of the basics of policy making in the EU, students will learn about the guiding principles and developments within EU environmental policy, the main actors and their interests in and influence on policy making. An optional part of the course might be a visit to the European House of the European Commission (EC) in Berlin where students either have the opportunity to role-play the decision-making process of the EC on the introduction of CO2-standards for cars or to engage in a debate with an EC representative. The second half of the course analyses EU environmental policies in different issue areas (e.g. climate change, biodiversity, waste) for their effectiveness in solving environmental problems. Different policy instruments are discussed for their merits and shortcomings (one example will be the EU Emissions Trading System) and linkages to other issue areas of EU policy making (e.g. industry and agriculture) are discussed. Finally, the course provides an international perspective on EU environmental policy making: sessions will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of EU environmental policy making at home and in international negotiations, compare it with US environmental politics, and discuss future challenges (e.g. EU enlargement) and trends for EU environmental governance.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students may not register for both this course and Comparative Modern Societies due to content overlap.

This course explores the interstices between State power and the individual in the context of Modern
Berlin and German history. Our exploration of individual confrontations with politics includes a
discussion of how individuals react to State terror––through collaboration or resistance––and how
identities flourish, transform or are extinguished under State policies. One important location for
individual responses to the State is the arts, and we explore in depth how State power has promoted or
stifled these creative voices throughout Europe. Special topics include coercive acculturation in Jewish-
German intellectual life, the destruction of the 20s musical Avant-garde, the rise of the Nazi Aesthetic in
Leni Riefenstahl’s documentaries, the intrusion of State Security (the Stasi) in private life, the photorealist
reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary
reassessment of individual and collective war guilt following reunification. Readings and lectures are
supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and
cultural change that has affected individual experience in situ.

Sample Syllabus


German Studies

From its beginnings, cinema in Germany was embroiled in heated debates about its
aesthetic, social and political value: Is cinema a form of art or mere entertainment for
the masses? And what does it mean to be a work of art? What is its significance as
popular medium? Film’s relevance reaches far beyond the worlds it depicts on
screen. It is intrinsically linked to questions of German identity and self-perception.
This course provides an overview of the changing roles of cinema in the turbulent
history of the 20th century in Germany as they manifests in changing visions of the
city. The course aims to give some insight into the competing ideas of intellectual
histories and evaluate them from the angle of the visual medium and to thus offer
insight in the construction of German identity.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students may not register for both this course and Comparative Modern Societies due to content overlap.

This course explores the interstices between State power and the individual in the context of Modern
Berlin and German history. Our exploration of individual confrontations with politics includes a
discussion of how individuals react to State terror––through collaboration or resistance––and how
identities flourish, transform or are extinguished under State policies. One important location for
individual responses to the State is the arts, and we explore in depth how State power has promoted or
stifled these creative voices throughout Europe. Special topics include coercive acculturation in Jewish-
German intellectual life, the destruction of the 20s musical Avant-garde, the rise of the Nazi Aesthetic in
Leni Riefenstahl’s documentaries, the intrusion of State Security (the Stasi) in private life, the photorealist
reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary
reassessment of individual and collective war guilt following reunification. Readings and lectures are
supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and
cultural change that has affected individual experience in situ.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three
German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations
of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and
individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions
of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social
theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of
their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of
Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sample Syllabus

This course addresses literary, cultural, and theoretical representations of Berlin and other big European cities such as Dresden and Paris. Accordingly, students will investigate different aspects of Berlin ranging from its cultural richness in the Weimar Period to the devastation of the city during World War II; from the division in the postwar period, which produced two separate literary systems, to polyphonic and transcultural texts after reunification. The course will focus on publications of canonical authors such as Alfred Döblin and Christa Wolf, but also confront the students with minority literature by Jewish and German-Turkish authors. In its theoretical approach, the course offers insights into new paradigms of cultural studies such as “spatial turn” or “urbanism” as well as seeking to enhance academic skills in the reflection of gender aspects. The corpus of readings covers different literary periods and genres from realism to postmodernism, from prose to plays and lyrics.

Sample Syllabus


Global Liberal Studies

Open to Global Liberal Studies students only.

This is a seminar designed to accompany Global Liberal Studies internships.

Sample Syllabus


History

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

The course examines significant moments in the development of Europe’s and America’s notions
and images of one another from the 18th century to the present. The in-depth discussion
will be based upon historical documents and cultural texts with equal attention to sources
from America/the US and Europe/Germany in an effort to explore and evaluate the major
theoretical and rhetorical paradigms (and the shifts therein) informing the perceptions as well
as cultural constructions of the “other” past and present. Moreover, the course will investigate
and evaluate recent manifestations of Anti-Americanism and analyse the ideo-logical and
cultural coordinates of current anti-American concepts in Europe/Germany as well as concepts
of Europe as a socio-cultural model for the 21st century. In conclusion, the politics of the
current US-Administration will be discussed in terms of their impact on transatlantic relations
as well as on dealing with global challenges, particularly in the Middle East.

Sample Syllabus

Students may not register for both this course and Berlin's History & Culture due to content overlap.

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrange¬ments were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narra-tives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During mu¬seum vis¬its and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to inte¬grate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

Sample Syllabus

Note: Students may not register for both this course and Comparative Modern Societies due to content overlap.

This course explores the interstices between State power and the individual in the context of Modern
Berlin and German history. Our exploration of individual confrontations with politics includes a
discussion of how individuals react to State terror––through collaboration or resistance––and how
identities flourish, transform or are extinguished under State policies. One important location for
individual responses to the State is the arts, and we explore in depth how State power has promoted or
stifled these creative voices throughout Europe. Special topics include coercive acculturation in Jewish-
German intellectual life, the destruction of the 20s musical Avant-garde, the rise of the Nazi Aesthetic in
Leni Riefenstahl’s documentaries, the intrusion of State Security (the Stasi) in private life, the photorealist
reflections of painter Gerhard Richter on terrorism in Berlin in the 1970s, and Germany’s literary
reassessment of individual and collective war guilt following reunification. Readings and lectures are
supplemented with walking tours of Berlin and its museums, to look at traces of historical, social and
cultural change that has affected individual experience in situ.

Sample Syllabus


Mathematics

Prerequisite: MATH-UA 122 Calculus II, MATH-UA 123 Calculus III and MATH-UA 140 Linear Algebra with a grade of C or better or the equivalent.

First and second order equations. Series solutions. Laplace transforms. Introduction to partial differential equations and Fourier series.

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: MATH-UA 121 Calculus I, MATH-UA 122 Calculus II and MATH-UA 123 Calculus III or equivalents with a grade of C or better.

Formulation and analysis of mathematical models. Mathematical tool include dimensional analysis, optimization, simulation, probability, and elementary differential equations. Applications to biology, sports, economics, and other areas of science. The necessary mathematical and scientific background will be developed as needed. Students will participate in formulating models as well as in analyzing them.

Sample Syllabus


Metropolitan Studies (Social & Cultural Analysis)

How do social movements form in response to environmental concerns? What makes them effective or ineffective? This course analyses the various social movements that organized in response to environmental concerns. Both historical and sociological dimensions of environmental movements are covered, with particular attention given to how issues of environmental protection and social justice intersect. At NYU Berlin, the course includes American (I), European, and in particular German (II), as well as global movements (III).

 

This course examines diverse current urban trends in Berlin and their connections to
worldwide phenomena. It focuses on the way that different social groups (according to
class, milieu, origin, gender or sexuality) appropriate urban space and constitute
place-specific identities.
It uses the city of Berlin with its multiple layers of history as a laboratory for
contemporary urban research with historical, empirical and theoretical material. We will
study key debates on urban developments, partly as field visits, in regard to housing,
migration, gentrification, and we will search for the creative and the sustainable city.
You will be introduced to the contemporary discourses on those trends and to new
ways of reading and seeing a city.

Sample Syllabus


Politics

This course provides a survey of the intellectual traditions from classic to modern
political thought in the West. Our exploration of political theory will proceed from a
close reading and analysis of seminal texts that are presented both conceptually and,
for the most part, chronologically. The primary focus will be placed on examining the
historical antecedents of some of the foundational concepts and practices that
distinguish our political behavior and institutions today. While taking account of the
historical complexities and stylized conventions of each text, the course will highlight
the recurrent themes that animate these influential writings and continue to shape our
contemporary understanding of politics. In particular, the lectures and discussions will
be geared towards tracing the conceptual underpinnings of current forms of political
organization, such as the nation-state and liberal democracy, and their effects on the
concerns of law, justice and morality. Some of the critical issues to be discussed
include the divergent views of human nature and ideal society, the structure of
authority and sovereignty, states of emergency, the defense of liberty, equality and
justice, and the different models of democratic practice.

Sample Syllabus 

Students may not register for both this course and Berlin's History & Culture due to content overlap.

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrange¬ments were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narra-tives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During mu¬seum vis¬its and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to inte¬grate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

Sample Syllabus

This course aims to provide an overview of the history, structure, functions, processes
and current issues of European integration with a particular emphasis on the role of
Germany both as to its influence on the EU and the Europeanisation of its own political
system.
European Integration is understood in this course to mean the co-operation, which EU
Member states organize in the framework of the Union, and the direction in which this
co-operation evolves. For these twenty-eight diverse countries, integration constitutes
an increasingly essential component and extension of their own state structure. It
permits them to conceive of, to decide on, and to carry out a growing number of
important state tasks in common, and under the roof of the European Union.
You will consider the milestones of postwar European integration. You will analyze the
institutions, procedures and instruments of European integration as well as major EU
policies and the distribution of competencies between Member States and Union. And
you will get acquainted with theoretical models to explain the nature of European
integration up to the present.

Sample Syllabus


Sociology

The Label "Advanced Seminar" attached to certain courses below is relevant ONLY for NYU Sociology majors and minors. It designates a course category internal to the NYU Sociology Department characterized by a seminar format and instruction by a regular member of the faculty. These seminars focus on the specific, most often interdisciplinary, research interests of the instructor and hence are not intended to be foundational offerings at either an elementary or advanced level in sociology or any other single discipline. For students other than NYU Sociology majors and minors, these courses should be considered ordinary seminars. For further clarification, please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the NYU Sociology Department, Professor Thomas Ertman, at te11@nyu.edu.

This course introduces the distinctive concerns and main perspectives of
sociological theorizing, and examines the value as well as the problematics of
'theorizing' modern (global) society through an introduction to the major
contributions of Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, Simmel and Weber. Attention will
be paid to the social and intellectual context of these thinkers, but the primary
focus will be on their ideas and their relevance to the analysis of modern society
and social processes.

Sample Syllabus

This course is designed as a collaborative project between NYUB and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin offering students a unique opportunity for academic and cultural exchange in a classroom that serves as a test lab for global education. The course will focus on the current realities and future possibilities of global higher education at the backdrop of its historical and conceptual coordinates. A glance at the con-temporary higher education landscape reveals ambivalent trends and directions: Excellence and internationalization protrude as paradigms that drive universities to secure their stakes in the global higher education market. National politics of education further enhance this competition among institutional front-runners by launching excellence initiatives or entering in supranational Bologna-type arrangements to facilitate cross-border academic exchange and knowledge production. Hence a range of distinct regional approaches to global education have emerged from national models and practices of education.
This course will serve as a site of academic dialogue between NYU and HU students in one classroom by pursuing the following three steps. First, it seeks to familiarize its participants with the visions and promises of global education while also paying attention to potential perils involved in globalizing national models of education. Among others, we will address questions such as: How are modes of producing and disseminating knowledge affected when education crosses borders? What does global education demand from student learners and how are globally educated citizens envisioned? How can experiences of knowledge production and education specific to one context be made operable in another? In a second step, the course introduces and compares regional approaches to global education. Different national histories of higher education yield different answers to the questions formulated in the first step. Yet, debates center around (one) global education, not educations. This tension requires scrutiny and, in a third step, it will ask students to develop an informed and critical position on the stakes of global education.
In order to make use of the unique classroom setting the course will employ independent (out-of-class) and in-class, individual and collective, analytical and interpretive formats. Students will be particularly encouraged to fully embrace the learning impulses resulting from the inter-cultural encounter between NYU and Humboldt students. The language we are going to acquire in this course is called global education. By starting to learn its rules and formulas, students are likely to see possible future trajectories of educational development and might even envision their future role in it. The class work will culminate in a colloquium at which both NYU and HU students will present their final group projects.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar.

Section A

Berlin is a unique modern Metropolis, its alternating history with often-drastic changes
offers a comprehensive background to explore and investigate the nature of
architecture in correlation to the various development processes of urban culture and life.
Architecture is embedded in the urban fabric for which place and time serve as main
threads, constantly changing their multifaceted and layered relationships. This urban
fabric provides the fertile soil for urban culture and life, which literally takes place in various scales
between the public and the private realm, two more threads intertwined to the urban fabric.
Experiencing the city through walking, is essential for learning how to observe, see
and read, "Place, Building and Time" in Berlin.
Tours will alternate with classroom discussions and workshops.

Sample Syllabus A

 

NYU Art History Students: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar.

The course is a mixture of classroom discussions and field trips (in conjunction with discussions in rooms provided by the National Museums of Berlin) to different museums in Berlin, with a focus on the five major museums on the Museum Island, which have been build over a period of 100 years (1830-1930). We will also talk about the newest addition to the Museumsinsel, the Humboldt Forum scheduled to open its doors in the reconstructed city palace on the Schlossplatz in 2019. Discussions will focus on the nature and social function of museums as well as their role as places where the image of the state and its civil society are constantly reshaped, until the era of global migration. Other topics include museums architecture, museum and identity, museum and education, museum and the 21st century. Previous knowledge of art history, architecture, or German history is not required, but useful.

Sample Syllabus

This course aims to provide an overview of the history, structure, functions, processes
and current issues of European integration with a particular emphasis on the role of
Germany both as to its influence on the EU and the Europeanisation of its own political
system.
European Integration is understood in this course to mean the co-operation, which EU
Member states organize in the framework of the Union, and the direction in which this
co-operation evolves. For these twenty-eight diverse countries, integration constitutes
an increasingly essential component and extension of their own state structure. It
permits them to conceive of, to decide on, and to carry out a growing number of
important state tasks in common, and under the roof of the European Union.
You will consider the milestones of postwar European integration. You will analyze the
institutions, procedures and instruments of European integration as well as major EU
policies and the distribution of competencies between Member States and Union. And
you will get acquainted with theoretical models to explain the nature of European
integration up to the present.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

The course examines significant moments in the development of Europe’s and America’s notions
and images of one another from the 18th century to the present. The in-depth discussion
will be based upon historical documents and cultural texts with equal attention to sources
from America/the US and Europe/Germany in an effort to explore and evaluate the major
theoretical and rhetorical paradigms (and the shifts therein) informing the perceptions as well
as cultural constructions of the “other” past and present. Moreover, the course will investigate
and evaluate recent manifestations of Anti-Americanism and analyse the ideo-logical and
cultural coordinates of current anti-American concepts in Europe/Germany as well as concepts
of Europe as a socio-cultural model for the 21st century. In conclusion, the politics of the
current US-Administration will be discussed in terms of their impact on transatlantic relations
as well as on dealing with global challenges, particularly in the Middle East.

Sample Syllabus

NYU Sociology Students: This course counts as an advanced seminar

This interdisciplinary course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three
German speaking writers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations
of modern life, which continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and
individuality. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these prominent traditions
of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in modern social
theories and poetics. Hence, the course will also include references to the writings of
their contemporaries, as well as explications of the direct and indirect influences of
Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on other writers.

Sample Syllabus

This course addresses literary, cultural, and theoretical representations of Berlin and other big European cities such as Dresden and Paris. Accordingly, students will investigate different aspects of Berlin ranging from its cultural richness in the Weimar Period to the devastation of the city during World War II; from the division in the postwar period, which produced two separate literary systems, to polyphonic and transcultural texts after reunification. The course will focus on publications of canonical authors such as Alfred Döblin and Christa Wolf, but also confront the students with minority literature by Jewish and German-Turkish authors. In its theoretical approach, the course offers insights into new paradigms of cultural studies such as “spatial turn” or “urbanism” as well as seeking to enhance academic skills in the reflection of gender aspects. The corpus of readings covers different literary periods and genres from realism to postmodernism, from prose to plays and lyrics.

Sample Syllabus

Students may not register for both this course and Berlin's History & Culture due to content overlap.

The history of Germany in the twentieth century offers rich material to explore various approaches to organizing modern society. Beginning with Imperial Germany in 1900 and moving forward to today’s reunited Germany, we will look at different ways in which the relationship between the state and the individual, and relationship between politics, economy, and society developed over five different political systems. We will interrogate how these institutional arrange¬ments were envisioned and structured and how they were experienced in everyday negotiations. In this course, principle narra-tives and events will be situated in a European and global context, allowing us to place the concept of German modernity in a comparative framework. Lectures will provide an overview of Germany in the twentieth century; readings and in-class discussions will explore different approaches to analyzing German history and society. During mu¬seum vis¬its and walking tours, we will analyze contestations over the various attempts to inte¬grate – both in concerted efforts to memorialize as well as to forget and erase – Germany’s oft-problematic pasts within the narrative of Germany’s present.

Sample Syllabus

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Upcoming Application Deadlines

Spring Semester

Priority: September 15

Regular: October 15

Applications received after October 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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