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Course Offerings - Fall 2011

Please note that all course offerings are subject to change. Changes in faculty availability and student enrollment can occasionally result in course cancellations.  

All students are required to register for a German Language course. A 0-2 credit course on German Society and Culture is also underdevelopment and may be required for all students beginning in Spring 2012.  If you are an advanced German student or have other academic questions, please contact nyu.in.berlin@nyu.edu.

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) - Please note that we are in the process of uploading syllabi and plan to have more available online soon.  In the meantime, if you have an urgent need for a course syllabus, please email global.academics@nyu.edu

Days/times and registration instructions will be made available closer to registration.  

 Fall 2011 | Spring 2012



German Language

All students are required to take a German language course (or course taught in German) for graded credit.  (This course cannot be taken Pass/Fail).

Prof. Linderman & Engel
A comprehensive course for beginners. Introduces students to a wide range of communication patterns and real-life situations. The beginner is given a solid language basis for interaction in daily life.

Sample Syllabus

This course continues your introduction to the language and everyday culture of German speaking countries. You will expand your understanding of important vocabulary and customs: family; free time; travel; food; childhood; health and wellbeing; the workplace, contemporary German society, literature and culture. You will also learn more advanced language structures and idioms, including past- and future tense narration; passive constructions; conditional statements; comparisons; prepositional phrases; relative clauses and other complex sentence structures. The focus of the course will continue to spoken communication and everyday language use, but there will also be increased attention to reading and writing tasks. Since the goals of communicative and grammatical competence are ultimately inseparable, students are guided towards using German as accurately as possible.This course covers the second part of a four part German course. Together, these courses (Elementary I and II and Intermediate I and II) should help you develop a level of proficiencyin German that would enable you to study abroad in German-speaking countries, to pursue advanced study of German in the US, or to use German for travel, leisure, and work.At the end of Intermediate German II (or Intensive Intermediate German) you will be prepared to successfully take a proficiency exam.

Sample Syllabus

Prof. Joo

Completes the equivalent of a year’s elementary work (V51.0001 and V51.0002) in one semester. Emphasizes spoken and written communication skills. Introduces students to the basic conventions, idioms, and structures of contemporary spoken German. 

Sample Syllabus

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of one year of elementary language instruction and to others on assignment by placement examination.

The first intermediate course stresses the acquisition and practice of more sophisticated written and spoken German. The focus is on expanding conversational skills, but the course also includes guided composition practice, vocabulary work, and grammar review. 

Sample Syllabus

Prerequisite: GERM-UA 9003, Intermediate German I or equivalent.

Prof. Rebecchi
A continuation of Intermediate German I.

Sample Syllabus

Prof. Thietz

Completes the equivalent of a year’s intermediate work (GERM-UA 3 and GERM-UA 4) in one semester. Continuing emphasis on developing spoken and written communication skills. Students learn more-advanced features of the language and begin to read longer and more-complex texts.

Sample Syllabus

Prof. A. Rebecchi
Designed to permit post-intermediate students to perfect their German skills while in Berlin.

Sample Syllabus


Courses Taught in German

Pre-requisite: Intermediate German II or equivalent

Prof. Thietz
The goal of this course is to introduce students with good German knowledge to a selection of representative German authors and exemplary texts from the beginning of 19th to the beginning of of 21st century. The selection of authors and texts represents important periods of literature with the focus on Berlin. The course covers the main literary genres – prose, poetry and drama and includes films, a theater workshop and visits to a theater performance and the locations regarding our texts. You will improve your reading and writing skills and your ability to express yourselves in German, both in writing and in speaking.

Sample Syllabus

Prof. Dischereit
This course examines contemporary literature of German authors who deal in one way or the other with questions of ethnic and national identities. This is a course that places special attention on shifting of identities. Special Focus: contemporary German-Jewish literature. Studies will be based on an interdisciplinary program which includes film, music, visual and performing arts. Students will attend cultural festivals and other important events at venues located throughout Berlin. The program will be tailored made to suit each student's particular interests: it can be held in English or bilingually, depending on students' German skills. 


Art and Arts Professions (The Steinhardt School)

Prof. Gonzalez
Intended for Studio Art students to work on projects over the course of the semester under the guidance of an artist mentor.

Fall 2011 Syllabus

Prof. Kleckner 

This course begins with the basic notion that the act of drawing creates a direct link between one’s eyes, mind, hand, and materials (be it pencil, paper, etc). Drawings are evidence of our ideas and concepts expressed visually. In this sense, drawing IS conceptual art. The assignments and projects in this course will develop and exercise each student’s skills in visual thinking, with the aim of improving fluency in visual expression. Students will learn a variety of approaches to drawing, collage, and working on paper. Most importantly, students will be challenged by the class projects in ways that will encourage artistic self-discipline, and help to motivate themselves to explore, stretch, and question their own artistic abilities and intentions.


Art History

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9941 (Sociology)

Students in the Art History Dept: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

Prof. B. Schneider
The course explores the history of Central European architecture from the Middle Ages to the 20th century on the basis of the architectural history of the city of Berlin. We will examine buildings from different epochs; why were they built the way and in the place we find them today; how were they planned, and for whom; what were they supposed to signify, and which story do they tell us today; in which way did and do they shape the public space, or the way we live; how have they been adapted for altered purposes, and are they capable of serving yet another purpose if necessary? The course will consist mainly of field trips to sites in and around Berlin.

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9940 (Sociology)

Students in the Art History Dept: This course counts for Urban Design credit or Art History Elective credit.

Prof. J. Baur
Explores the changing social and historical significance of Berlin's famous Museum Island through an examination of its origins, architecture, collections and fate under six German political regimes. Will include regular visits to the Museum Island as well as to the rival Kulturforum.

Sample Syllabus


Environmental Studies

Prof. TBA

A systematic survey of central concepts and issues relating to environment and society, including environmental history and concepts of nature and the environment; the rise of environmentalism; environmental skepticism; anthropogenic global change; population and consumption, ecological footprint analysis, and other environmental indicators; environmental justice; public goods and collective action problems; regulatory regimes; environmental politics; environmental movements; environmental values; environmental protest and disobedience; and the future of environmentalism. 

Prof. TBA 
This course is under development.  Course description coming soon.

European Studies

Cross-listed with  SOC-UA 9471 (Sociology) and POL-UA 9471 (Politics)

Prof. Deubner 
Provides an overview of the legal and institutional foundations of the European Union before focusing on the question of the EU's democratic legitimacy or lack thereof. The historical process of European unification will be explored and various positions on the EU's democratic deficit and ways to remedy it examined. The roots of the current tensions between Europe and the U.S. and the future of European-American relations will also be discussed. 

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9938 (Sociology) and HIST-UA 9938 (History)

Professor R. Isensee 
Examines the development of Europe's and America's images of one another from the 18th century to the present through literary texts and historical documents, with special attention to sources from Germany. The roots of current U.S.-European tensions, both cultural and political, will also be explored. 


German Studies

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9460 (Sociology) and HIST-UA 9460 (History)

Prof. A. Nader
Examines the rich history of the city of Berlin principally through visits to sites associated with the Prussian, imperial, Weimar, National Socialist and Communist regimes. Explores the cosmopolitan reality of contemporary Berlin through trips to diverse neighborhoods and discussions with community representatives. 

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9435 (Sociology)

Prof. Lezzi
This course examines contemporary literature of German authors who deal in one way or the other with questions of ethnic and national identities. This is a course that places special attention on shifting of identities. Special Focus: contemporary German-Jewish literature. Studies will be based on an interdisciplinary program which includes film, music, visual and performing arts. Students will attend cultural festivals and other important events at venues located throughout Berlin. The program will be tailored made to suit each student's particular interests: it can be held in English or bilingually, depending on students' German skills.

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9942

Prof. R. Khan
This course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German thinkers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life. The aim of the course is to provide an introduction to the central ideas and texts of each author, and construct dialogues on topics such as the modern subject, history, art, interpretation, religion, politics and morality. While taking account of the historical complexities and stylized conventions of each text, the course will highlight the recurrent themes that animate these influential writings and continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individual. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these influential traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in contemporary social thought and humanities. 

Prof. Curtis
The course offers an introduction to German Cinema from its beginnings in November 1895 at the Wintergarten Cabaret to the present-day renown (especially in France) of the Berliner Schule. Central to our examination of the films that we will be viewing both at a screening series taking place every Tuesday evening and in excerpt during the class will be an examination of the following question: what kind of access can the moving image offer us to that which is absent, whether temporally or geographically?

Sample Syllabus


History

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9133 (Sociology) and POL-UA 9133 (Politics)

Prof. M. Jander
Explores the society, politics and culture of contemporary Germany through lectures, readings and visits to institutions and organizations around Berlin. Examines the historical developments in the 20th century (failed democratization, National Socialism, Communism, postwar reconstruction, reunification) that have shaped today's Federal Republic. Germany's place within a united Europe will also be discussed. 

Cross-listed with EURO-UA 9938 (European Studies) and SOC-UA 9938 (Sociology)

Prof. R. Isensee
Examines the development of Europe's and America's images of one another from the 18th century to the present through literary texts and historical documents, with special attention to sources from Germany. The roots of current U.S.-European tensions, both cultural and political, will also be explored.

Sample Syllabus 

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9460 (Sociology) and GERM-UA 9193 (German Studies)

Prof. Nader
Examines the rich history of the city of Berlin principally through visits to sites associated with the Prussian, imperial, Weimar, National Socialist and Communist regimes. Explores the cosmopolitan reality of contemporary Berlin through trips to diverse neighborhoods and discussions with community representatives. 


Metropolitan Studies

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9935 (Sociology)

Prof. R. Isensee
This course explores Berlin and New York in historical and comparative perspective by examining their shared status as global cities and centers of knowledge production. The course begins by looking at the formation of the European and American city as knowledge centers in historical perspective, particularly in terms of the influence of German educational philosophy and practice on 19th century American institutions. Next, the course examines the shifting aims and institutional paradigms of education in Europe and the United States since the 20th century, focusing especially on the emergence of the knowledge relationship between Berlin and New York. Through field study projects we wil investigate public and private educational institutions in Berlin in terms of their impact on the politics, economy and culture of the city. Finally, we look at 21st century knowledge production, and the functions of global knowledge cities like Berlin and New York in transnational and international perspective. 

Cross-listed with SOC-UA 9461 (Sociology)

Professor Bojadžijev
This course synthesises some of the most important concepts in relation to the movement of people and the city. We will examine the key debates in migration and urban theory and their relevance to the movement of migrants. The impact of historic, social, economic and political factors on the migratory process will be considered. The postcolonial condition of cities and its relation to the movement of peoples will be explored. The course will draw on case studies from Europe, focussing in particular on the city of Berlin. The impact of racism, citizenship rights, transnational communities, social networks and the migration experience will be considered in relation to theories of integration and migrant settlement. The course covers historical, theoretical and empirical concerns relating to migration, postcolonialism and the city and their interaction with integration and settlement. Excursions to historical and contemporary sites of (post)colonialism and migration in Berlin will complete the course. In addition, exchanges with invited speakers are intended to contribute to an experience that allows students to benefit from recent research and interaction that Berlin affords. 


Politics

Prof. TBA
This course provides a broad survey of the main traditions of classical, modern, and contemporary political thought in the West. The primary focus will be placed on examining the historical antecedents of some of the foundational concepts and practices that distinguish our political behavior and institutions today. Some of the critical issues discussed include the divergent views of human nature and ideal society, the structure of authority and sovereignty, the rise of political morality, the defense of liberty, equality and justice, and different models of democratic practice.

Sample Syllabus 

Cross-listed with HIST-UA 9133 (History) and SOC-UA 9133 (Sociology)

Prof. M. Jander
Explores the society, politics and culture of contemporary Germany through lectures, readings and visits to institutions and organizations around Berlin. Examines the historical developments in the 20th century (failed democratization, National Socialism, Communism, postwar reconstruction, reunification) that have shaped today's Federal Republic. Germany's place within a united Europe will also be discussed. 

Cross-listed with EURO-UA 9471 (European Studies) and SOC-UA 9471 (Sociology)

Prof. Deubner 
Provides an overview of the legal and institutional foundations of the European Union before focusing on the question of the EU's democratic legitimacy or lack thereof. The historical process of European unification will be explored and various positions on the EU's democratic deficit and ways to remedy it examined. The roots of the current tensions between Europe and the U.S. and the future of European-American relations will also be discussed.

Sample Syllabus 


Sociology

 The Label "Advanced Seminar" attached to certain courses below is relevant ONLY for NYU Sociology majors and minors. It designates a course category internal to the NYU Sociology Department characterized by a seminar format and instruction by a regular member of the faculty. These seminars focus on the specific, most often interdisciplinary, research interests of the instructor and hence are not intended to be foundational offerings at either an elementary or advanced level in sociology or any other single discipline. For students other than NYU Sociology majors and minors, these courses should be considered ordinary seminars. For further clarification, please contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the NYU Sociology Department, Professor Thomas Ertman, at te11@nyu.edu.

Cross-listed with SCA-UA 9680 (Metropolitan Studies)

Prof. R. Isensee
This course explores Berlin and New York in historical and comparative perspective by examining their shared status as global cities and centers of knowledge production. The course begins by looking at the formation of the European and American city as knowledge centers in historical perspective, particularly in terms of the influence of German educational philosophy and practice on 19th century American institutions. Next, the course examines the shifting aims and institutional paradigms of education in Europe and the United States since the 20th century, focusing especially on the emergence of the knowledge relationship between Berlin and New York. Through field study projects we wil investigate public and private educational institutions in Berlin in terms of their impact on the politics, economy and culture of the city. Finally, we look at 21st century knowledge production, and the functions of global knowledge cities like Berlin and New York in transnational and international perspective. 

Cross-listed with HIST-UA 9133 (History) and POL-UA 9133 (Politics)

Prof. M. Jander
Explores the society, politics and culture of contemporary Germany through lectures, readings and visits to institutions and organizations around Berlin. Examines the historical developments in the 20th century (failed democratization, National Socialism, Communism, postwar reconstruction, reunification) that have shaped today's Federal Republic. Germany's place within a united Europe will also be discussed. 

Prof. R. Khan
Examines the nature of sociological theory and the value and problems of theorizing. Provides a detailed analysis of the writings of major social theorists since the 19th century in both Europe and America such as Marx, Tocqueville, Durkheim, Weber, Parsons, Foucault, Bourdieu, Luhmann and Habermas. 

Cross-listed with HIST-UA 9460 (History) and GERM-UA 9193 (German Studies)

Prof. A. Nader
Examines the rich history of the city of Berlin principally through visits to sites associated with the Prussian, imperial, Weimar, National Socialist and Communist regimes. Explores the cosmopolitan reality of contemporary Berlin through trips to diverse neighborhoods and discussions with community representatives. 

Cross-listed with ARTH-UA 9651 (Art History)

Prof. B. Schneider
The course explores the history of Central European architecture from the Middle Ages to the 20th century on the basis of the architectural history of the city of Berlin. We will examine buildings from different epochs; why were they built the way and in the place we find them today; how were they planned, and for whom; what were they supposed to signify, and which story do they tell us today; in which way did and do they shape the public space, or the way we live; how have they been adapted for altered purposes, and are they capable of serving yet another purpose if necessary? The course will consist mainly of field trips to sites in and around Berlin.

Cross-listed with EURO-UA 9471 (European Studies) and POL-UA 9471 (Politics)

Prof. Deubner 
Provides an overview of the legal and institutional foundations of the European Union before focusing on the question of the EU's democratic legitimacy or lack thereof. The historical process of European unification will be explored and various positions on the EU's democratic deficit and ways to remedy it examined. The roots of the current tensions between Europe and the U.S. and the future of European-American relations will also be discussed.

Sample Syllabus 

Cross-listed with ARTH-UA 9850  (Art History)

Prof. J. Baur
Explores the changing social and historical significance of Berlin's famous Museum Island through an examination of its origins, architecture, collections and fate under six German political regimes. Will include regular visits to the Museum Island as well as to the rival Kulturforum.

Sample Syllabus

Cross-listed with EURO-UA 9938 (European Studies) and HIST-UA 9938 (History)

Professor R. Isensee
Examines the development of Europe's and America's images of one another from the 18th century to the present through literary texts and historical documents, with special attention to sources from Germany. The roots of current U.S.-European tensions, both cultural and political, will also be explored. 

Cross-listed with SCA-UA 9634 (Metropolitan Studies)

Professor Bojadžijev
This course synthesises some of the most important concepts in relation to the movement of people and the city. We will examine the key debates in migration and urban theory and their relevance to the movement of migrants. The impact of historic, social, economic and political factors on the migratory process will be considered. The postcolonial condition of cities and its relation to the movement of peoples will be explored. The course will draw on case studies from Europe, focussing in particular on the city of Berlin. The impact of racism, citizenship rights, transnational communities, social networks and the migration experience will be considered in relation to theories of integration and migrant settlement. The course covers historical, theoretical and empirical concerns relating to migration, postcolonialism and the city and their interaction with integration and settlement. Excursions to historical and contemporary sites of (post)colonialism and migration in Berlin will complete the course. In addition, exchanges with invited speakers are intended to contribute to an experience that allows students to benefit from recent research and interaction that Berlin affords. 

Cross-listed with GERM-UA 9298 (German Studies)

Prof. E. Lezzi
This course examines contemporary literature of German authors who deal in one way or the other with questions of ethnic and national identities. This is a course that places special attention on shifting of identities. Special Focus: contemporary German-Jewish literature. Studies will be based on an interdisciplinary program which includes film, music, visual and performing arts. Students will attend cultural festivals and other important events at venues located throughout Berlin. The program will be tailored made to suit each student's particular interests: it can be held in English or bilingually, depending on students' German skills. 

Cross-listed with GERM-UA 9240, (German Studies)

Prof. R. Khan
This course examines the works of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud, three German thinkers who pioneered radically different and influential interpretations of modern life. The aim of the course is to provide an introduction to the central ideas and texts of each author, and construct dialogues on topics such as the modern subject, history, art, interpretation, religion, politics and morality. While taking account of the historical complexities and stylized conventions of each text, the course will highlight the recurrent themes that animate these influential writings and continue to shape our contemporary understanding of society and individual. The seminar not only delves into the origins of these influential traditions of modern Western thought, but also underscores their relevance in contemporary social thought and humanities. 

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Upcoming Application Deadlines

Fall Semester

Priority: February 15

Regular: March 15

Applications received after March 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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