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Course Offerings - Fall 2011

Fall 2011 | Spring 2012


Course content and availability are subject to change. Exact courses offered at University of Ghana-Legon will not be available at registration time, but sample courses are listed here.

Click on a course name to see a course description and a sample syllabus from a past semester. (Current syllabi may differ.) - Please note that we are in the process of uploading syllabi and plan to have more available online soon.  In the meantime, if you have an urgent need for a course syllabus, please email global.academics@nyu.edu

Course days/times and registration instructions will be made available closer to registration.  


Africana Studies

Professor J. Collins
Using a variety of paradigms, this course explores a broad range of popular musical forms in sub-Saharan Africa as stylistic areas. Southern, Central, East and West Africa (Francophone and Anglophone) musical styles are considered. The historical scope of the inquiry extends from 19th century to the present. The investigation seeks to highlight the relationships among popular music, traditional performance, and the social and cultural forces of modernization.

Sample Syllabus


Cross-listed with ANTH-UA 9101 (Anthropology)

Professor G.K. Nukunya
The course introduces students to aspects of Ghanaian society and culture. It considers both traditional aspects of life and how people live their lives in this first decade of the new millennium. How Ghanaians perceive and conceive themselves and their society; how others view the society and life of Ghanaians also receive critical attention. The course emphasizes that Ghanaians are not an undifferentiated lot and that what the different people say their behavior should be differs from what their actual behavior is. Students will get to examine these varied perceptions and perspectives as well as construct their own representations of the society. The course will also attempt to answer questions about Ghana and Ghanaians that are of interest to the non-Ghanaian getting acquainted with the country. The course combines talks, readings, discussions, visits, and students' presentations in class. There will be a written examination at the end of the semester and a dissertation on an aspect of Ghanaian society and culture that students might choose to explore.

Cross-listed with COLIT-UA 9850 (Comparative Literature)
Note: this course is open to all students for elective credit. Comparative
literature majors in track ii (literary and cultural studies) may count this
course toward one of their non-core major requirements.

Professor K. Anyidoho
The course examines certain recurring themes and critical issues in post-colonial narratives in Africa. It begins with a look at the debate and polemics around post-colonialism as a critical and theoretical concept. It then dwells on specific narratives, mainly novels by African writers, works located in the period following classical colonialism. The reading of these narratives is informed by such critical issues as the crisis of cultures in contact; personal, class, ethnic and national identities; the politics of gender; debates over language; the aesthetics and politics of art; strategic transformations in narrative form, etc.

Sample Syllabus

This course is also listed under Metropolitan Studies.

Professor P. Jaddo
This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Sample Syllabus

Professor Adu-Gyamfi
The course is designed to provide basic communicative competence in oral and written Twi for beginners. It focuses on the structure of the language as well as the culture of the people. The areas covered include i) oral drills; ii) orthography; iii) written exercises; iv) translation (from English to Twi and from Twi to English); v) reading and comprehension; vii) conversation and narration (dialogues, greetings, description of day-to-day activities, bargaining, giving directions); viii) Grammar (parts of speech, nouns, e.g., verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, particles, determiners; tense, aspect, negation, and questions; and ix) and the culture.

Professor K. Saah
Course description coming soon.


Anthropology

Cross-listed with SCA-UA 9776 (Africana Studies)

Professor G.K. Nukunya
The course introduces students to aspects of Ghanaian society and culture. It considers both traditional aspects of life and how people live their lives in this first decade of the new millennium. How Ghanaians perceive and conceive themselves and their society; how others view the society and life of Ghanaians also receive critical attention. The course emphasizes that Ghanaians are not an undifferentiated lot and that what the different people say their behavior should be differs from what their actual behavior is. Students will get to examine these varied perceptions and perspectives as well as construct their own representations of the society. The course will also attempt to answer questions about Ghana and Ghanaians that are of interest to the non-Ghanaian getting acquainted with the country. The course combines talks, readings, discussions, visits, and students' presentations in class. There will be a written examination at the end of the semester and a dissertation on an aspect of Ghanaian society and culture that students might choose to explore.


Art History

Professor J. Anquandah
This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to explore Ghanaian art and art history in their historical, anthropological and archaeological contexts. The course serves both as a survey and critique of the literature on West African art, and as an exploration of method and theory in sub-Saharan art historical research. Students explore major works from key periods of Ghanaian artistic and cultural production and are involved in practical work in laboratories and museums dealing with art specimens from local archaeological sites and ethnographic contexts.

Sample Syllabus


Art and Arts Professions (The Steinhardt School) -- NYU Ghana's Steinhardt Art courses have been cancelled for Fall 2011


Comparative Literature

Professor E. Sutherland
This course shall focus on the place of women in the literary tradition, an issue that is very current in the discourse on the literature of Africa and its Diaspora. Women writers have emerged at the forefront of the movement to restore African women to their proper place in the study of African history, society and culture. In this process, the need to recognize the women as literary artists in the oral mode has also been highlighted. Furthermore, the work of women writers is gaining increasing significance and deserves to be examined within the context of canon formation. Authors and texts will be examined, focusing on such topics as the heritage of women's literature, images of women in the works of male writers; women in traditional and contemporary society; women and the African family in the literary tradition; literature as a tool for self-definition and self-liberation; African women writers; female expressions of cultural nationalism in the Caribbean; female novelists of the African continent; Black women dramatists; the poetry of African women.

Sample Syllabus

Cross-listed with SCA-UA 9781 (Africana Studies)

Professor K. Anyidoho
The emergence and growth of Modern African Literatures are closely linked to the imposition of colonialism and the resulting anti-colonial resistance. The use of European languages as the dominant vehicle of much of this writing is the clearest evidence of this imposition. But how African writers have used these languages of imposition to meet their own needs is also evidence of the resistance tradition in modern African literatures. With the theme of colonialism as a unifying factor, the course explores and compares the works of a number of African writers of the so-called Anglophone, Francophone, and Lusophone traditions. It conceptualizes their works within a counter-European tradition by examining the discursive reaches of their writing.

Sample Syllabus


Creative Writing

Professor K. Awonoor
This is a workshop type course intended for a small group of students, each with a strong aptitude and/or demonstrated talent for creative writing. Our basic objective is to guide students into a more systematic approach to creative writing in any of the main genres, especially fiction and poetry. Each student is expected to engage in critical discussions on samples of their own writing as well as on writing by other members of the class. Our focus shall be on developing a grasp of the rudiments and general mechanics of the writer's craft, while at the same time allowing for a fuller realization of the personal/individual creative impulse and talent. Some class sessions will be devoted to various types of writing exercises, others to the discussion of sample texts, most of it produced by members of the class. Each student will be expected to share his/her work with the class and possibly with a wider audience when possible. At the end of the semester, each student will be expected to have produced a substantial body of creative writing for assessment by the course instructors.


Gallatin School of Individualized Study

Cross-listed with SCA-UA 9042 (Social and Cultural Analysis).

Professor J. Baffour
Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.


History

Professor Baku
The course examines the rise, growth, effects, and the abolition of the Atlantic Slave trade as well as its legacy. The course begins with a discussion of the nature of West African society before the introduction of the Atlantic Slave Trade; and the relations among Asante peoples, other neighboring West African peoples, the indigenous slave trade, and relations with Europeans in the Atlantic Slave Trade. The Atlantic Slave trade itself is analyzed from historical, ethnographic, sociological, economic and political perspectives, focusing on Africa, Europe and the Americas. The immediate and long term effects of the Slave Trade on Africa are considered, as well as the history of the trade's Abolition, and the legacy of the Atlantic Slave trade in African, European and American societies.

Sample Syllabus


Metropolitan Studies

Professor N. Amarteifio
Counter to the prevailing view of a rural African living in traditional communities, the majority of Africans are rapidly becoming urban dwellers. African cities are fast joining the ranks of mega-cities, global market hubs and centers for political and cultural exchange. This phenomenon raises important questions that form the basis for this course. Are these cities merely the products of globalization, or do their roots lie in pre-colonial tradition? Are global cities a new phenomenon in Africa, or can we find traces of earlier international links? What factors define the spatial geography and political economy of urban Africa? What challenges do African governments face in managing the city? How has the architecture and the arts of the African city been influenced by external connections?

This course examines those factors that have shaped Accra throughout history. While the emphasis of the course is on Accra, the course also introduces the main theoretical debates across disciplinary fields in the comparative study of the city. Students will be challenged to utilize primary resources such as national archives and special collection libraries, maps, and various cultural resources to address some of the questions being posed.

Sample Syllabus

This course is also listed under Africana Studies.

Professor P. Jaddo
This interdisciplinary course combines ethnographic readings, representations, and interpretations of city and urban cultures with a video production component in which students create short documentaries on the city of Accra. The interpretative classes will run concurrently with production management, sights and sound, and post-production workshops. The course will have three objectives: (1) teach students the documentary tradition from Flaherty to Rouch; (2) use critical Cinema theory to define a document with a camera; and (3) create a short documentary film.

Sample Syllabus

This course is also listed under Africana Studies and is cross-listed with Gallatin (K50.9701)

Professor J. Baffour
Enrollment by permission only. Application required. Contact global.academics@nyu.edu for application information. Course includes weekly seminar and minimum of 10 hours fieldwork/ week at approved internship fieldsite.


Psychology

Professor C. Akotia
Community Psychology attempts to understand people in their social contexts. It integrates social action and psychological research in culturally diverse contexts. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the breadth of topics, social issues, and research approaches that characterize community psychology. These topics include the history of Community Psychology, major theoretical approaches, and the nature and methods of community research. In addition, the course explores different perspectives on mental health, and research and practices related to programs intended to promote or prevent certain behaviors. Finally the course explores the relationship between communities and social change. Teaching will be in the form of lectures, discussions, and class presentations.


Public Health & Public Policy (Steinhardt)

Professor K.A. Senah
This course will examine the various dimensions of the field of public health and how the public’s health is protected. Students explore the ways social, economic, and political forces influence the health of populations. Additionally, this course will focus upon some of the current ethical public health dilemmas where the rights of the individual versus the rights of society come into conflict. The course makes use of diverse methods of instruction, including, but not limited to, small group discussion, group exercises, mini-lectures, student debates, field-based group projects and student presentations. Students may be involved in gathering information and observations from projects outside of the classroom at government, NGO and health care institutions.

Sociology

Professor A. Darkwah
Globalization has become a buzzword in our time. Four different sets of literature have been developed around this concept. The first set of literature seeks to define the concept in terms of its relationship to the changing workforce, technology and communications, culture and finance. A second set of literature debates the novelty of the various processes encoded in the concept of globalization. Another set of literature debates the changing role and nature of the state in an era of globalization. The final set of literature debates the issue of whether the economic prospects of the developing world indeed hinge on their full participation in the globalization process. This course will expose students to these four sets of literature and provide the students with an opportunity to interrogate the very concept of globalization and to debate its benefits and disadvantages for the developing world in general and Africa in particular.

Sample Syllabus

Direct Enrollment at University of Ghana-Legon

The NYU Accra program was created within a larger community of universities and scholars and has deeply integrated itself within the culture of Accra. NYU Accra enjoys a strong multicultural exchange with scholars and students at our partner university in Accra, the University of Ghana-Legon. Many students compliment their studies at the NYU academic center by enrolling directly in one or two courses at the University of Ghana-Legon.

Widely recognized as one of the top institutions of higher education in West Africa, the University of Ghana-Legon, based on the Oxbridge model (reflecting Ghana’s former status as a British colony), is the country’s flagship university. Home to some of West Africa’s foremost scholars, it offers hundreds of courses and a full range of academic programs with particular strengths in African studies, the social sciences, and the performing arts.

Current courses and syllabi will only be available upon arrival at NYU Accra. Credits and course equivalency, if any, are to be determined in consultation with student's departmental advisor. Any course expected to count for major/minor credit should be pre-approved by student's advisor. (Students are encouraged to obtain a written record of approval for their records.)

Actual fall course listings from all departments will only be available upon arrival. Students may find the sample course lists provided below useful in discussing their planned semester abroad with their advisor.

Archeology, Botany, Dance, Economics, Geography, History, Linguistics, Music, Nutrition, Politics, Psychology, Religion, Social Work, Sociology, Theatre, Zoology

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Upcoming Application Deadlines

Spring Semester

Priority: September 15

Regular: October 15

Applications received after October 15 will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Admission will be granted only when space is available and time allows for required travel documents to be attained.   

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