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Event Schedule

Calendar of Events

Come back soon to see our schedule of events for Fall 2018.

Spring 2018 Teaching Development Programs

The NYU Center for the Advancement of Teaching is pleased to announce its teaching development programming for Spring 2018. These programs are offered at no cost to full- and part-time NYU faculty as well as graduate students. Refreshments will be provided at all programs. Space is limited and registration is required; registration information is included below.

In addition to a variety of lunch programs and intensive workshops, CAT offers the Teaching at the Tap Room series. The Tap Room talks offer a chance for faculty to come together to discuss pedagogical issues with experts and peers alike, while enjoying drinks and refreshments in an informal and relaxed setting.


Making Learning Stick: Strategies for Effective Teaching and Learning Workshop

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

One of the challenges every teacher faces is how to ensure not just that students learn, but that what they learn stays with them over time. Learning lost soon after it occurs is essentially worthless. Unfortunately, too much learning falls into this category. What teaching strategies and approaches best result in enduring learning? How can we increase the possibility that what students learn actually “sticks?” This workshop will explore common misconceptions about teaching and learning, along with alternative best practices that recent research has shown to result in successful, effective, long-lasting learning.


Teaching at the Tap Room - Emotional Intelligence, Resilience and Creativity: Learning Life Skills Through Entrepreneurship

  • Wednesday, February 7, 2018
  • 5:00-6:30 p.m.
  • NYU Torch Club
  • 18 Waverly Place 

FEATURING: Erica Gruen, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

The development of an “entrepreneurial mindset” can be cultivated through encouragement and strategies that help students tolerate ambiguity and risk, persevere and be resilient, and create and test literally thousands of ideas without succumbing to frustration and despair. In other words, the skills that our students need to succeed not only as entrepreneurs but also in life! During this discussion, we will explore structured activities to teach these skills both in and out of the classroom.


Active Learning Workshop

FEATURING: Anton Borst, Robert DiYanni, and Trace Jordan, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Active learning is a broad term for teaching strategies that engage students directly in their learning through reading, writing, talking, listening, and reflecting. Active learning involves asking questions, solving problems, applying knowledge, making connections, and more. Research demonstrates that when students are actively engaged in learning, they understand better and they retain more of what they learn. This workshop introduces specific strategies for engaging students in active learning, including think-pair-share and other reflective writing-based activities.


Using Learning Analytics to Enhance My Teaching and Student Engagement

  • Thursday, February 15, 2018
  • 12:30-2:00 p.m.  (Lunch will be offered beginning at 12:15 p.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 914 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Faculty and Instructional Designers from NYU

Faculty who are participating in Learning Analytics pilot will share their experiences and learnings using data from their courses to improve teaching and better understand how students are engaging with learning materials.


Download Presentation— Advancing Inclusive Learning Communities: Nudges, Tools and Resources for Capacity Building featuring Liza Cariaga-Lo

Advancing Inclusive Learning Communities: Nudges, Tools and Resources for Capacity Building

Advancing Inclusive Learning Communities: Nudges, Tools and Resources for Capacity Building

  • Thursday, February 22, 2018
  • 12:30-2:00 p.m.  (Lunch will be offered beginning at 12:15 p.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 914 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Liza Cariaga-Lo, Senior Advisor to the Provost and faculty member, Department of Education, Brown University

Working in a diverse academic community, faculty and instructors require critical knowledge, skills and relevant tools and resources to be able to engage with  the many intersectional identities that students—and teachers—bring to our learning, working and living environments. In this highly interactive workshop, we will explore multi-dimensional considerations of effective approaches inside the classroom and beyond.


Writing and Learning Workshop 

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Writing and learning, like writing and reading, are reciprocal acts: they inform and sustain each other.  Putting pen to paper or fingers to keyboard prompts thinking; considering what to say and how to say it sharpens ideas, locks in learning, and leads to further discoveries.  In this workshop, we will discuss different modes of writing to learn, including formal and informal writing, exploratory and generative writing, writing that invokes real-world contexts and applications, graded and ungraded writing, writing for assessment, writing to stimulate discussion and improve classroom atmosphere, scaffolded writing projects, writing to read critically, and, above all, writing to inspire and enrich thinking across disciplines.


Critical Thinking Workshop

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Critical thinking is a term much bandied about in academia, and though there is considerable agreement about the importance of critical thinking, there is less understanding of what the term means and what it looks like in practice. More often than not what suffices is Supreme Court Justice Potter Stuart’s famous non-definition of obscenity: “I know it when I see it.” This workshop will identify the characteristics of critical thinking and of critical thinkers. Participants will engage in interactive critical thinking exercises that can be used with students to help them develop their critical thinking capacities.


Collaborative Learning Workshop

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Group work benefits learning, enhances classroom engagement, and cultivates the skills of communication, collaboration, and problem-solving students will need to succeed in any field. But it brings with it a number of pedagogical challenges. How do you a design an effective group work activity or project? How do you assess it? And how do you persuade students of its value and its fairness? In exploring these questions, we will discuss strategies for using group work to better meet the learning goals of your course.


Teaching at the Tap Room – Everyone Can Learn: Encouraging Inclusion In and Out of the Classroom

  • Wednesday, March 21, 2018
  • 5:00-6:30 p.m.
  • NYU Torch Club
  • 18 Waverly Place

FEATURING: Allan Goldstein, NYU Tandon School of Engineering Senior Lecturer

Professor Allan B. Goldstein will share his experience using participatory research to pair “typical” students—students without disabilities—and people with disabilities in a project-based course. Over the semester, students learn that all people are people first; they learn to talk to the person, not the “chair.” Working with difference sharpens these students’ analytical thinking, while also helping them understand that the invisible impairments they themselves may live with no longer need to be hidden. Typical students and their partners with disabilities both benefit, as inclusion in the classroom expands their horizons and reinforces the fact that the 20% of Americans living with disability today are a vibrant workforce and a large market. We are all variations on the theme of being human.


Linking Instruction, Analytics, and Research Workshop

FEATURING: Faculty and Instructional Designers from NYU

Faculty who are interested in learning more about how analytics can be used to inform their instruction will have a chance to participate in a hands on workshop. Using examples from their own courses, the workshop provides some real-life approaches to begin thinking about course data and instructional choices.


Building Your Mentoring Networks: Make Every Connection Count

FEATURING: Mary Deane Sorcinelli, Co-PI, Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, Association of American Universities (AAU); Distinguished Teaching and Learning Advisor, American Council on Education (ACE); Senior Fellow, Institute for Teaching Excellence & Faculty Development, University of Massachusetts Amherst

This program will explore the role of mentoring in contributing to academic career advancement and success. Recent literature and practice now offer new, more flexible approaches to mentoring in which faculty build a network of “multiple mentors” who can address a variety of career competencies. In this interactive session, you will identify your professional goals, strengths, and skills that you want to develop; explore mentoring as a medium for helping you meet those goals; “map” your own mentoring networks (what they are and could be); and discuss best practices for seeking, developing, and cultivating a network of mentors.