Calendar of Events

Spring 2019 Teaching Development Programs

The NYU Center for the Advancement of Teaching is pleased to announce its teaching development programming for Spring 2019. These programs are offered at no cost to full- and part-time NYU faculty as well as graduate students. Refreshments will be provided at all programs. Space is limited and registration is required; registration information is included below.

In addition to a variety of lunch programs and intensive workshops, CAT offers the Teaching at the Tap Room series. The Tap Room talks offer a chance for faculty to come together to discuss pedagogical issues with experts and peers alike, while enjoying drinks and refreshments in an informal and relaxed setting.


Embarrassment and Learning Workshop

  • Friday, February 1, 2019
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 802 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

One of the greatest impediments to learning is fear, and one of students’ greatest fears is the fear of embarrassment. In discussion or other classroom activities, students may fear appearing ignorant, negligent, or incapable of learning. They may worry about exposing themselves as not fit for the course, the program, or even college itself. Such fears, of course, reflect feelings of unworthiness and low self-regard, which can impede the learning process. In this interactive workshop we will address these student concerns and consider how we can create conditions in our classrooms whereby students feel able to take risks, make mistakes, and learn from those mistakes without feeling acute emotional distress. A central question will be: What can we do to ensure that students become willing and active participants in their learning so that their anxieties and fears, if not completely eliminated, are sufficiently mitigated to assist rather than inhibit their learning?


Teaching at the Tap Room - "Growing Up in Science" - Mentorship Through Personal Narrative

  • Wednesday, February 6, 2019
  • 5:00-6:30 p.m.
  • NYU Torch Club
  • 18 Waverly Place

FEATURING: Weiji Ma, Faculty of Arts and Science

Professor Wei Ji Ma (Neural Science and Psychology) will discuss the "Growing up in Science" series, which he started at NYU, and which has since been replicated at other institutions. In a typical session, a faculty member tells his or her life and career story with an emphasis on struggles, failures, detours, and sources of insecurity. Recurring themes include early-life influences, conflicts with advisors, work-life balance, impostor feelings, and procrastination. Students and postdocs report that this form of mentorship contributes to humanizing faculty, places their own struggles in a different light, and helps build a supportive and open community in the department.


Motivating Student Learning Workshop

  • Friday, February 8, 2019
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 802 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Inspiring students to learn is among the first and most important challenges we face as teachers. Research suggests that highly motivated students not only earn better grades, but also develop deeper understanding of concepts along with longer lasting learning. This interactive workshop will explore strategies for encouraging, developing, and sustaining students’ motivation to learn. Participants will come away with useful applications for classroom practice.


How We Learn Workshop

  • Friday, February 22, 2019
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 802 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Trace Jordan and Monica Lewin, Faculty of Arts and Science

How do humans learn and remember information? Are some study strategies better than others? How can we design courses and assessments to promote optimal learning? This workshop presents the scientific principles of learning that are based in neuroscience and cognitive psychology. Participants will have the opportunity to apply these principles in their own courses and enhance how students learn.


Teaching at the Tap Room - After The Apocalypse: Recovery And Reconstruction Post Maria In Puerto Rico At Institutions Of Higher Education

  • Wednesday, February 27, 2019
  • 5:00-6:30 p.m.
  • NYU Torch Club
  • 18 Waverly Place

FEATURING: Margarita Benítez, Executive Director, Puerto Rico Foundation for the Humanities

Hurricane María was an equal opportunity ravager for both public and private institutions of higher education throughout Puerto Rico. How most of them bounced back, and how many were changed, is a story worth telling. The session will also include a discussion of the roles played by mainland institutions that sought to assist students and institutions affected by the hurricane, and a reflection on lessons learned to address future natural disasters, both on the ground and from a distance.


Great Teachers and Productive Researchers: Can We Do Both?

  • Thursday, February 28 , 2019
  • 12:30-2:00 p.m.  (Lunch will be offered beginning at 12:15 p.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Room 914 (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Charlton McIlwain, Vice Provost for Faculty Engagement and Development

Research and teaching are often pitted against each other, where faculty success depends on the former at the expense of the latter. Do scholars, particularly those who must or desire to build and maintain high-level research agendas, have to choose between being either great teachers or great researchers? What are some practical ways that scholars can help minimize the need to choose? Can we do aspire to both, and if so, what resources and practices may help us make good on those aspirations?


Using Visuals in Teaching Workshop

  • Friday, March 1, 2019
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Rooms 802  (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Instructors have long incorporated many kinds of visuals into their teaching. Visuals such as images and data visualizations can leaven a lecture and add variety to a set of slides. Visuals can provoke student thinking, jump-start class discussion, serve as prompts for writing and exam questions, and more. But whether these benefits are fully realized depends on what we do with our visual media in the classroom. This workshop will explore ways of using visuals to engage students and enhance learning with a focus on the critical reading of visual texts.


Teaching at the Tap Room - Teaching with Popular Culture

  • Wednesday, March 6, 2019
  • 5:00-6:30 p.m.
  • NYU Torch Club
  • 18 Waverly Place

FEATURING: Heather Woodley, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

The young adults in our classrooms are learning every day from sources well beyond required text books. They are watching and discussing music, film, television, social media, games, comics, and more. These elements of popular culture, these texts of real life, are valuable tools for students to make connections to academic content and skills, and to build bridges to teaching for social justice. We will explore examples of diverse media, including IG/FB/Twitter, Netflix's Black Mirror and The Haunting of Hill House, Hulu's The Handmaid's Tale, Marvel's Black Panther, and various popular music genres. We also will explore tangible ways to integrate them into our class content and assessments, including collaborative groupings and authentic assessments.


Academic Writing Workshop

  • Friday, March 8, 2019
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • NYU Torch Club, 18 Waverly Place

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

What is academic writing and how do we teach it to our students? These are the central questions we will explore during this interactive workshop, in which we will confront an under-acknowledged paradox of teaching: that sometimes being an expert practitioner of something can make teaching more, rather than less, difficult. Participants will develop and share strategies through discussion and group tasks as we work through several writing samples.


Discussion-Based Teaching Workshop

  • Friday, March 29, 2019
  • 9:30-11:30 a.m.  (Breakfast will be offered beginning at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Kimmel Center for University Life
  • Rooms 802  (60 Washington Square South)

FEATURING: Anton Borst and Robert DiYanni, Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Discussion-based teaching—on its own or alongside lecture—engages students and provides opportunities for them to practice an array of skills, including critical thinking, collaboration, and oral communication, among others. But how do we ensure that our classroom conversations are productive? Effective discussions occur when they are prepared in advance, when they are led with a purpose, and when they are summarized and assessed. Good discussions lead to further thinking and more directed discussion. In this workshop we will consider the principles of effective discussion-based teaching. Topics will include how to begin and conclude a discussion, and what to avoid during discussion. Participants will have the opportunity to develop discussion-based approaches to their course content.


SPECIAL PROGRAM — To Be Announced

FEATURING: Beverly Wade Hogan, Tougaloo College

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Faculty Development Opportunities (NYUSPS CAES)

School of Professional Studies — Center for Academic Excellecne and Support

Workshops are offered in in-person, online (asynchronous), and webinar formats. Take a look at their upcoming Summer and Fall Offerings:  https://caes.sps.nyu.edu/events-and-workshops/