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Gifted and Talented Programs

  • Gifted & Talented (G&T) programs are for what the NYC Department of Education (NYCDOE) describes as "exceptional students" and falls under the category of a special need.
  • The NYCDOE provides Gifted & Talented (G&T) programs in each borough. These programs are designed for students who have met the established eligibility criteria and students enrolled are grouped together in a self-contained classroom for the entire school day and receive appropriate instruction in all content areas.
  • G&T programs are designed to differentiate instruction, provide appropriate enrichment opportunities, compact the curriculum, and/or accelerate the content for this special needs population.
  • The NYCDOE administers testing to determine students eligible for G&T programs. Testing is available for children pre-kindergarten through grade 2 who are current New York City residents and wish to be considered for self-contained G&T programs for grades K-3.
  • To ensure equitable access, the admissions test is available in a variety of languages. See the NYCDOE website for additional details.
  • The Otis-Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT) and the Bracken School Readiness Assessment (BSRA) have been used in combination to provide a thorough and balanced look at each child’s intellectual abilities and to identify
    appropriate students. Beginning in 2013, the Otis-Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT) will be coupled with the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT®2). A detailed description and sample questions are posted on the DOE website.
  • Siblings who qualify for G&T programs are guaranteed a seat in the same program as their sibling. If a sibling does not qualify for the gifted program, an attempt will be made to place them in the General Education program at the same school, depending on space. Students are offered enrollment in citywide or district programs depending upon their test results; 97% and above are considered for city-wide programs, and those with 90% and above are considered eligible for district-wide programs.

Timeline for Applying to District and City Wide G&T

Remember: You are only guaranteed a seat in your zoned public school so it is important to visit the school to understand its strengths and challenges, learn how parents are engaged in the school, *and* apply during the stated time period.

September-October

  • Obtain a Gifted & Talented Handbook on-line or at one of the Borough Enrollment Offices.
  • Review and familiarize self with timelines.
  • Complete and submit a "Request For Testing" (RFT) application before the stated deadline. The earlier you submit the application the better your chances of securing a preferred testing date and location.

January/February

  • G&T testing generally takes place in January and February.

April

  • Families are notified of score reports and those who have made the cutoff scores are invited to rank choices and submit application for placement.
  • Applications are due to the NYC-DOE.

May

  • Families are notified about placement offers.

June

  • Families must accept or decline placement offer. If accept, then must register at school during the time period identified.
  • Families who accept a G&T placement must notify the zoned school in which they registered that they are releasing their seat at the zoned school.

July

  • Families who move to the City after the RFT deadline may have an opportunity to have their child(ren) screened during the summer.

Additional Information

  • Learn more about NYC public schools on Inside Schools.
  • Find your zoned school with the NYC Department of Education mapping tool or by calling NYC's Information Line, 311.
  • Hunter College Elementary School  provides a public option in the private sector for Manhattan residents with children entering Kindergarten
  • Speyer-Legacy School is a private independent school designed for accelerated learners, Kindergarten through 8th grade.
  • P.A.L. Workshops offers programming and resources for parents, educators, mental health professionals and others who work with and care about "high potential youth."

 

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