PRIMARY RESEARCHERS

Dr. Joseph E. LeDoux

Emotional Brain Institute; Center for Neural Science at NYU; New York University Langone School of Medicine

Joseph LeDoux is the director EBI and is also a University Professor, Henry and Lucy Moses Professor of Science, Professor of Neural Science and Psychology, and Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the NYU/Langone School of Medicine. His research is focused on the relation between emotion and memory, and his main laboratory is in the Center for Neural Science at NYU. LeDoux's books, The Emotional Brain and Synaptic Self, have been translated into numerous languages and are used to guide researchers and clinicians in their efforts to understand and treat emotions. His work at NYU and the EBI aims to build on his past research using animal models to unlock the secrets of emotions, especially fear and anxiety.



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Dr. Regina Sullivan

Emotional Brain Institute; Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research; New York University Langone School of Medicine

Regina Sullivan is a Research Scientist at NKI and a Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the NYU/Langone School of Medicine. Her research is focused on the ontogeny of fear and the amygdala in infant rats, she is particularly interested in unique early life constraints on fear learning and how this strengthens pups' attachment to their mother. Her lab's current research is characterizing how the simple presence of the mother can switch olfactory fear conditioning to odor preference learning through modulation of corticosterone, the amygdala and the olfactory circuit. Her work has also demonstrated how early life emotional experiences can have lifelong consequences, and she is attempting to reverse the negative aspects of these early life experiences. Dr Sullivan's unique and exciting research program involves both animal models and human infant work.


Dr. Donald Wilson

Emotional Brain Institute; Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research; New York University Langone School of Medicine

Donald Wilson is a Research Scientist at NKI and a Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the NYU/Langone School of Medicine. His research is focused on perceptual learning, sensory gating, object coding, and hedonic coding in the mammalian olfactory system. He is particularly interested in how experience can shape sensory coding resulting in changes in perceptual acuity as well as associating emotional meaning to sensory objects. The theoretical underpinnings of this approach are described in his book with Richard Stevenson “Learning to Smell” (Johns Hopkins University Press). His work explores these processes across the lifespan, from early development to dementia. His lab’s current work includes examination of sensory cortical contributions to fear generalization, the role of sleep in consolidation of sensory memory, and the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on sensory processing.


Dr. Christopher Cain

Emotional Brain Institute; Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research; New York University Langone School of Medicine

Christopher Cain is a Research Scientist at NKI and a Research Assistant Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the NYU/Langone School of Medicine. His research is focused on the neural circuits and mechanisms important for learning to effectively cope with fear. Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear extinction and instrumental avoidance conditioning are the major animal models studied in Dr. Cain’s laboratory. He is particularly interested in how these learning processes interact during the fear recovery process. Pharmacology, electrophysiology, lesions and imaging of immediate-early genes are some of the techniques used in his laboratory. Dr. Cain’s research goal is to discover ways to improve the treatment of human pathological fear through studies of basic learning processes in animals.


AFFILILIATED RESEARCHERS

Dr. Dayu Lin

New York University Langone School of Medicine

Dayu Lin is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the NYU/Langone School of Medicine. Her research focuses on social behaviors such as mating, fighting, defense, predation and parenting, which are indispensable and ubiquitous across the animal kingdom. Research in her laboratory centers on understanding the neural circuits underlying these powerful behaviors in a genetically tractable model system - mice. She is interested in investigating how the sensory information is relayed, integrated, extracted and diverged to ultimately cause the behavioral output. Various genetic engineering, tracing, functional manipulation, in vivo electrophysiological recording and computational tools are combined to dissect the neural circuits in great detail.




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