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  NYU College of Dentistry Home  > Faculty Experts Media Guide > Human Evolution, Growth, Development, and Life History

Human Evolution, Growth, Development, and Life History

TIMOTHY G. BROMAGE, PhD
Professor of Biomaterials and Biomimetics and of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology

EXPERTISE:
Ancestral origins of human tooth and bone development, and microanatomy of ancestral human “Lucy”; biological rhythms linking tooth growth to other metabolic processes.

PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND:
Recipient, Max Planck Research Award, the highest international honor bestowed in the natural sciences; Director, Hard Tissue Research Unit, NYU College of Dentistry; former Professor, Department of Anthropology and Thomas Hunter Honors Program, Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY); former Professor of Anthropology, Biology, and Earth and Environmental Sciences, CUNY Graduate School

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PUBLICATION HIGHLIGHTS:
“Bone Rhythms Correspond to Enamel Periods and Reflect Life History.” Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (2008)

“Regional Variability in Secondary Remodeling within Long Bone Cortices of Catarrhine Primates: The Influence of Bone Growth History.” Journal of Anatomy (2008).

“Man’s Earliest Direct Ancestors Looked More Apelike Than Previously Believed.” Global Health Nexus (2007).

“Hard Tissue Biology in Human Health and Evolution.” Evolutionary Medicine (2007).

“Variation in Enamel Development of South African Fossil Hominids.” Journal of Human Evolution (2006).


PAGE W. CAUFIELD, DDS, PhD
Professor of Cariology and Comprehensive Care

EXPERTISE:
Evolution of humans and their oral bacteria from a common ancestor; mother-to-child transmission of caries (cavities); severe childhood caries

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PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND:
Editorial board member, Journal of Dental Research; member, American Dental Association Expert Panel on Dental Sealants; Honorary Professor, West China College of Stomatology; former Clinical Scholar and Fellow, Harvard School of Medicine; former Research Fellow, Forsyth Research Center; former Professor of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham. Principal investigator on a five-year, $1.83 million grant awarded in 2008 by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research for research to help identify those at risk for severe early childhood caries

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PUBLICATION HIGHLIGHTS:
“Genetic Classification of Severe Early Childhood Caries Using Subtracted DNA Fragments from Streptococcus mutans.” Journal of Clinical Microbiology (2008)

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“The Effect of Dental Sealants on Bacteria Levels in Caries Lesions: A Review of the Evidence.” Journal of the American Dental Association (2008).

“Population Structure of Plasmid-Containing Strains of Streptococcus mutans, a Member of the Human Indigenous Biota.” Journal of Bacteriology (2007)

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“Diversity of Lactobacilli in the Oral Cavities of Young Women with Dental Caries.” Caries Research (2007).

“Ancestral Eve Was Mother of All Tooth Decay.” Global Health Nexus (2007)

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ELENA CUNNINGHAM, PhD
Adjunct Associate Professor of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology

EXPERTISE:
Primate cognition; mental mapping of food resources in the wild and in captivity.

PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND:
Funded by the National Geographic Society; paper presented at the 23rd Conference of the International primatological Society in Kyoto, Japan, on “From Random Walks to Travel Routes: Understanding Patterns of Primate Movement.”

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PUBLICATION HIGHLIGHTS:
“Finding the Balance: OptimizingPredatoravoidance and Food Encounters Through Individual Positioning in Pithecia pithecia During Travel.” In Evolutionary Biology and Conservation of Titis, Sakis and Uacaris (Studies in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology). Eds: L. Veiga, A. Barnett, M. Norconk, and S. Ferrari. Cambridge University Press, 2010.

“A Socioecological Perspective on Primate Cognition, Past and Present.” Animal Cognition (2007).

“Integrating Information About Location and Value of Resources by White-faced Saki Monkeys (Pithecia pithecia).” Animal Cognition (2007).