2017 Constitution Day Slam

Constitution Day Slam

Join the NYU Brademas Center and NYU Government Affairs in celebrating the signing of the U.S. Constitution with a spoken word and poetry slam. Constitution Day, also known as Citizenship Day, is an American federal observance that recognizes the adoption of the United States Constitution (September 17, 1787) and those who have become U.S. citizens.

NYU Students, faculty/staff as well as local community members have been invited to submit a video of their performance inspired by the U.S. Constitution. 8 finalists have been selected to perform their piece on Monday, September 18, 2017 at 8pm in Eisner & Lubin Auditorium, Kimmel Center for Student Life, 60 Washington, Square South. Three winners will be selected and receive a $100 prize.*

The Constitution Day Slam is meant to engage the NYU and local community and provide a platform for individuals to share their talents and voices. Participants are encouraged to express themselves creatively, and to be respectful of the expression of others who may have differing views. Profanity and hate speech are prohibited. Poets are asked to refrain from the use of profanity, sexually explicit content, and/or language that degrades any group of people. Violation will result in potential disqualification and likely scorn from the organizers and audience.

  • Brendan Boursiquot - Transparency
  • Jeremy Boyd - Red, White, and 230 Years Later
  • Christina GaytonListen
  • J. Metje - We The People
  • Lauren Nguyen - Green Card
  • Bill Rui - Work in Progress
  • Raul Hernando Sanchez - Ghost People
  • Emilie Weiner - The Oak and The Vine

Performance Date and Location:

Monday, September 18, 2017 - 8pm: Einser & Lubin Auditorium, NYU Kimmel Center for Student Life, 60 Washington, Square South.

Event Emcee

Advocate of Words


Judges

Khalid Abu Dawas

Khalid Abu Dawas

Catherine Barnett

Catherine Barnett

James Ciano

James Ciano

Daniel Gallant

Daniel Gallant

Rules:

  1. Each poem must be of the poet’s own construction;
  2. Each poet gets three minutes (plus a ten-second grace period) to read one poem. If the poet goes over time, points will be deducted from the total score.
  3. The poet may not use props, costumes or musical instruments;
  4. Of the scores the poet received from the five judges, the high and low scores are dropped and the middle three are added together, giving the poet a total score of 0-30.

*Winners will be paid by NYU Accounts Payable by University check, and must provide address and contact information, along with a completed W9 form. WInners will be selected from a judges panel.