Computer Science Department
Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences



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Lectures
Prerequisites
Textbook
References
Slides
Handouts
Course Structure
NYU ID
Collaboration
Open Door Policy

Data Communications & Networks


G22.2262-001 - Spring 2010




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General Information

    Instructor

    Teaching Assistants and Graders

    Lectures

    • Location: CIWW 109
    • Time: Thursdays 7:10-9:00 PM

    Prerequisites

    • Students enrolling in this class are expected to have taken G22.2110 (i.e., Programming Languages) and G22.1170 (i.e., Fundamental Algorithms) and their prerequisites. At a minimum, students must have a working knowledge of fundamental data structures and associated algorithms. For some of the practical aspects of the course, a working knowledge of an object-oriented programming language (e.g., C++, C#, or preferably Java) is expected. Prior exposure to some of the fundamental data structures that are common to communications protocol implementations (e.g., FSM, Ring Buffers, etc.) is a plus.

      If you are new to Java, the following text is a good introduction to the Java programming language. However, please note that the book is not designed to teach object-oriented programming:

      The Java Programming Language, Third Edition, Ken Arnold, James Gosling, David Holmes Addison-Wesley Pub Co; ISBN: 0201704331

      If you need a Java tutorial that includes an introduction to object oriented programming, please try the free Java Tutorial.

    Textbook

    • Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach (5th Edition)
      James F. Kurose, Keith W. Ross
      Addison Wesley, ISBN-10: 0136079679, ISBN-13: 978-0136079675, 5th Edition (03/09)

    References (TBA)

    Slides

    • The powerpoint slides presented in class will be available for convenient browsing on the Web. The slide sets will also be available in PDF form for convenient printing and review.

    Handouts

    • Handouts may also be distributed in class and will, in some cases, be available in electronic form on the class Web site.

    Course Structure

    There will be one required lecture each week. Readings will be assigned at the end of each lecture. There will be assignments and projects throughout the course. The due date will be specified on each given assignment. Assignments may consist of problems similar to those in the textbook, small (less than 500 lines of code) programs, and packet analysis using the Ethereal packet sniffer. Some assignments may be more difficult than others and therefore their respective weights towards the final grade will vary accordingly. Homework will be generally due right before class the day the assignments are due. The due dates for the assignments will be announced when the assignments are assigned. The submission method (i.e. electronic submission, paper submissions, the format, etc.) will be specified in each assignment. Late homework will not be accepted without the instructor's prior permission. Extensions are available only in the case of dire emergencies.

    There is a final exam in this class, which wil be either in-class or take-home. No make-up exam will be scheduled. Class participation will be measured based on individual student's ability to answer questions asked during class over time as well as ask questions related to the material covered in the course. If you have a conflict with the exam date, you should not be taking this class without making prior arrangements with the instructor.

    Each student will have access to an I5 account. Please check with the instructor for information concerning your I5 account.

    A class mailing list has been setup to facilitate communication with the class pertaining to questions, assignments, grades, changes in requirements etc. The class Web page is http://www.nyu.edu/classes/jcf/g22.2262-001_sp10/. This page will have further links to pages with announcements, handouts, etc. Students are required to log in and check the page at least once a week to make sure they are up to date with any information pertaining to the course.

    The Web site is the primary means of getting information outside of class. The mailing list will be used for urgent messages, such a updates and hints for the homeworks.

    If you have any questions, issues that you want to discuss, or things that you would like to have clarified, please see the instructor as soon as possible.

    The final grade for the course will be determined as follows:
    • Assignments 25%
    • Projects 35%
    • Attendance and class participation 10%
    • Final 30%
    • Extra credit will be granted periodically for particular clever or creative solutions.
    To receive a passing grade, you must complete satisfactory work in every area. In other words, you must receive passing grades for your homework (cumulatively) and a passing grade on the final.

    If you have any concerns about your grade or about the grading, please feel free to see the instructor.

    NYU ID

    In order to access the ITS Computer Labs and Clusters, you must have a valid NYU ID card. See how to obtain an NYU ID card if you do not already have one.

    Collaboration

    You are required to do the assignments and projects by yourself; collaborating with other students or copying their work will not be tolerated. Anyone found copying or using another persons work will be dealt with under NYU's procedures for cheating. The consequences range from receiving a failing grade for the assignment to expulsion. Please consult the department's academic integrity policy for more details.

    However, we do strongly encourage students to discuss the materials covered in class. It is also acceptable to help or receive help from other students concerning features of Windows, Linux, or the UNIX operating system, or any other application that you use. There is a fine line between discussion and cheating. If you feel uncertain about whether you are crossing the line feel free to discuss these issues with the instructor before you do so.

    Open Door Policy

    We would like the course to run smoothly and enjoyably. Feel free to let the instructor know what you find good and interesting about the course. Let the instructor know sooner about the reverse. See the instructor, leave him a note, or send him an email.


    Jean-Claude Franchitti, <jcf (followed by @, then cs, then a dot, then nyu, then a dot, and then edu)>
    Last modified: Thu April 29 04:31:18 EDT 2010