E85.2033 CREATIVE PROCESS IN MUSIC EDUCATION

© Copyright 1997, John V. Gilbert, All Rights Reserved.
Introduction
This course, unlike many other courses, depends entirely upon who we are and where we start from. This is not so much a syllabus as it is a design to facilitate process. From the references, the personal exploring, and the activities of a community of creators, we hope to reveal something more of ourselves and our own creative process so that as teachers we can facilitate the creative growth and activity of our students. In the class you are a composer, a poet, a music maker, an improviser. These will be the activities that will form the daily substance of our meetings. From the topics below and from our own experience and reading, other topics will develop. What this course becomes, what we become, will be unique to this class and this journey.

Preliminary Topics

NOTHINGNESS AND SILENCE

AN INNER JOURNEY

IMPROVISATION

SPONTANEITY

ORIGINALITY

INNER MUSIC, IMAGINATION AND AUDIATION

LISTENING AS CREATIVE RESPONSE

MAKING MUSIC AND MUSIC MAKING

CREATIVE PROCESS AND THE CLASSROOM

CREATIVE TEACHING AND CREATIVE LEARNING

EQUIPMENT

Yourself---dressed for adventure, a portable sound recorder, an instrument, a blank book.

TERM PROJECT

1. Develop a creative project which will draw upon your personal resources and talents, and which will challenge you to grow conceptually and in acquiring additional or new skills.

OR

1. Develop a research paper which focuses on some aspect of creativity suggested by this course, your experience, and your reading.

2. Keep a journal of the class activity, the reading, and your own reflection on your creative process and activity. This journal is for your eyes only. For the class, provide a critique of the process of journal keeping as a means of personal inquiry.

EVALUATION

Students will be evaluated on class participation, requested written assignments, and term project.

ASSIGNED READINGS

1. Hemingway."A Clean, Well Lighted Place"

2. Novak. The Experience of Nothingness

3. Read at Least Two References and provide written responses.

REFERENCES

  1. Three Classics in the Aesthetic of Music.1962, New York: Dover Publications, Inc. 188.

  2. Arieti, S., Creativity: The Magic Synthesis. 1976, New York: Basic Books, Inc. 448.

  3. Barron, F., Creative Person and Creative Process. 1969, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc. 212.

  4. Boden, M.A., The Creative Mind. 1991, New York: BasicBooks. 303.

  5. Boyd, J., Musicians in Tune. 1992, New York: Fireside Simon and Schuster. 288.

  6. Burrows, D., Sound, Speech, and Music. 1990, Amherst: The University of Massachusetts Press. 138.

  7. Copland, A., Music and Imagination. 1952, Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 116.

  8. Dewey, J., Art as Experience. 1979, New York: Paragon Books. 355.

  9. Ghiselin, B., ed. The Creative Process. 1952, Mentor Books: New York. 249.

  10. Gilbert, J. V., ed. Qualitative Evaluation in the Arts. Vol. II. 1984, New York University: New York. 208.

  11. Through Music to the Self. 1978, Longmead: Element Books, Ltd. 225.

  12. Hemingway, E.,"A Clean, Well-lighted Place," in The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway. 1966, Charles Scribner's Sons: New York. p. 379-383.

  13. Henri, R., The Art Spirit. 1951, New York: J. B. Company. 226.

  14. Herrigel E., Zen in the Art of Archery. 1989, New York: Vintage Books. 81.

  15. Karagulla, S., Breakthrough to Creativity. 1973, Santa Monica, Ca.: DeVorss and Co., Inc. 263.

  16. Matanovic', M., Lightworks. 1985, Issaquah, Wa: Lorian Press. 204.

  17. McLuhan, M., Understanding Media: the Extensions of Man. 1966, New York: Signet Books. 311.

  18. Nin, A., The Diary of Ana•s Nin. Vol. I. 1966, New York: The Swallow Press and Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. 368.

  19. Novak, M., The Experience of Nothingness. 1971, New York: Harper and Tow, Publishers. 146.

  20. Ratner, L. G., The Musical Experience: Sound Movement and Arrival. 1983, New York: W. H. Freeman and Company. 153.

  21. Rugg, H., Imagination. 1963, New York: Harper and Row. 361.

  22. Russcol, H., The Liberation of Sound: An Introduction to Electronic Music. 1972, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. 315.

  23. Slaboda, J. A., ed. Generative Processes in Music. 1988, Oxford University Press: Oxford. 298.

  24. Smith, F. J., The Experiencing of Musical Sound. 1979, New York: Gordon and Breach. 255.

  25. Watts, A. W., The Book. 1966, New York: Collier Books. 150.

  26. Zuckerkandl, V., Man the Musician: Sound and Symbol. Bollingen Series XLIV, Vol. Two. 1973, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. 370.