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Making Speech Visible

For the 10 percent of preschool and elementary school-aged children affected by speech-sound disorders, the request to "repeat after me" can present a real challenge. A child who struggles with the "r" sound, for example, may also have trouble hearing the difference between a "good" "r" and a "bad" "r." That's why speech pathologists at NYU's Steinhardt School are using ultrasound and acoustic biofeedback to present the "r" sound visually—allowing those with speech impairments to focus on what a sound "looks like."

In this video, Tara McAllister Byun, assistant professor of communicative sciences and disorders, and assistant research scientist Heather Campbell describe and demonstrate this unconventional therapy, which is currently being tested on English-speaking children aged 9 to 14. Study participants receive FREE therapy sessions twice a week for a 10-week period. More information for parents, educators, and caregivers of potential participants is available here.

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