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How the Harlem Rattlers Changed the Face of the American Military

In the new book Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality NYU history professor Jeffrey Sammons and his co-author, John H. Morrow, Jr. of the University of Georgia, profile the first unit of African Americans to fight in Europe during World War I. Some 70 percent of the soldiers hailed from northern Manhattan, earning them the nickname the "Harlem Rattlers." In all, 375,000 African Americans served in The Great War, changing the face of the U.S. military forever. See Sammons speak about the book, and the 369th Regiment, in a C-Span lecture

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