The Center for Ancient Studies will host “Persepolis, Then & Now,” a one-day conference that will explore the impact of this ancient city on modern artists, on Thurs., November 21.

Persepolis in Iran. View of the ancient ruins.
Persepolis in Iran. Photo credit: uskarp/Getty Images

New York University’s Center for Ancient Studies will host “Persepolis, Then & Now,” a one-day conference that will explore the impact of this ancient city on modern artists, on Thurs., November 21, in NYU’s Hemmerdinger Hall, Silver Center for Arts and Science, 100 Washington Square East (enter at 32 Waverly Place or 31 Washington Place [wheelchair accessible]).

“Persepolis, Then & Now,” this year’s Rose-Marie Lewent Conference, will introduce the audience to ancient Persepolis, invaded by Alexander the Great and situated in present-day Iran, through its history, archaeology, and art, and then explore how and to what ends modern artists in different genres have used that past in their work. Session I will focus on “Ancient Persepolis and Its Rediscoveries” and Session II will examine “Persepolis in the Modern Artistic Imagination.”  The conference is held in conjunction with the exhibition Modernisms: Iranian, Turkish, and Indian Highlights from NYU's Abby Weed Grey Collection, on view at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery from September 9 to December 7, 2019.

For more information, including a complete schedule of sessions, please visit: http://as.nyu.edu/ancientstudies/news.html.

The event is free and open to the public, but an RSVP is required at http://as.nyu.edu/ancientstudies/news.html.  For more information, call 212.992.7978 or email ancient.studies@nyu.edu. Subway Lines: 6 (Astor Place); R, W (8th Street)

The conference is presented by the NYU Center for Ancient Studies in conjunction with the Grey Art Gallery, and is cosponsored by the NYU Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies, the Iranian Studies Initiative, and the College of Arts and Science.

EDITOR’S NOTE:
NYU’s Center for Ancient Studies was created in 1996 to promote interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study of the past. Directed by Matthew S. Santirocco, and supported largely through endowment, the Center funds travel grants for undergraduate and graduate students, annual research conferences and lectures, and summer outreach seminars for faculty from across the United States (in collaboration with the Faculty Resource Network). Scholarly organizations that are based at the Center include the American section of the Institute for Etruscan and Italic Studies and its journal, Etruscan News, and the Aquila Theatre Company.