Historian David Levering Lewis, a two-time Pulitzer-Prize-winning author, will discuss the legacy of businessman-turned-presidential-candidate Wendell Willkie on Tues., March 5.

David Levering Lewis
Historian David Levering Lewis, above, a two-time Pulitzer-Prize-winning author, will discuss the legacy of businessman-turned-presidential-candidate Wendell Willkie on Tues., March 5. ©Rothenberg: Courtesy of NYU Photo Bureau

Historian David Levering Lewis, a two-time Pulitzer-Prize-winning author, will discuss the legacy of businessman-turned-presidential-candidate Wendell Willkie on Tues., March 5, 6-7:30 p.m., at New York University’s King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center (53 Washington Square South, 1st Floor Auditorium [betw. Thompson and Sullivan Streets]).

The event, sponsored by the Center for the Study of Transformative Lives, is free and open to the public.

Levering Lewis, a professor emeritus of history at NYU, is the author of The Improbable Wendell Willkie: The Businessman Who Saved the Republican Party and His Country, and Conceived a New World Order (Liveright). He captured the Pulitzer Prize for both volumes of his biographies of W.E.B. DuBois.

In his lecture, introduced by Center Director Philip Kunhardt, Levering Lewis will discuss the Indiana businessman’s legacy. Willkie, seen as one of the most unexpected major-party candidates for the presidency, challenged Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1940 with an alliance of supporters that included anti-big-government business leaders and African-American voters, who were excluded from many New Deal benefits. In his defeat, Willkie, who received the largest percentage of Republican votes in a generation, proposed civil rights reform decades before the civil rights era as well as a progressive “new conception of the world” before his death in 1944.        

Seating is limited. RSVP by emailing transformative.lives@nyu.edu or visiting https://bit.ly/2I1nKDl. For more information, please call 212.998.4291 or visit www.transformativelives.org.

Subway Lines: A, B, C, D, E, F (West 4th Street); R, W (8th Street); 6 (Astor Place)

EDITOR’S NOTE:
The Center for the Study of Transformative Lives at New York University is dedicated to the study and teaching of the lives and accomplishments of extraordinary individuals who have made a profound contribution to the common good. For more, go to: http://www.transformativelives.org/