The Asian/Pacific/American Institute will host a symposium to mark 120 years since 1898—the end of the Spanish-American War and the beginning of the U.S. “imperial moment”—on Fri., Nov. 16.

"Call Her Ganda"
A screening of "Call Her Ganda" will be hosted by NYU's A/P/A Institute on Nov. 16. Courtesy of PJ Raval.

New York University’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute will host a symposium to mark 120 years since 1898—the end of the Spanish-American War and the beginning of the U.S. “imperial moment”—on Fri., Nov. 16, 2-9 p.m. at NYU’s King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center, screening room (53 Washington Square South, first floor [between Thompson and Sullivan Sts.]).

Panels entitled “Restive Empires” and “The Indigenous Pacific” will feature scholars Faye Caronan (University of Colorado), Christine DeLisle (University of Minnesota), Augusto Espiritu (University of Illinois), Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio (University of Hawai’i), Dean Saranillio (NYU), and Laura Torres-Rodríguez (NYU).

The symposium will conclude with a screening of the award-winning documentary Call Her Ganda and discussion with director PJ Raval. For a complete schedule, please click here: https://bit.ly/2pZbNlE.

The symposium is free and open to the public; registration is required at https://bit.ly/2pZbNlE or by calling 212.992.9653.

The year 1898 has conventionally been regarded as the American “imperial moment,” when the United States acquired and occupied a number of island nations, both in the Pacific and the Caribbean. One hundred twenty years after the Treaty of Paris, which ended the Spanish-American War, as well as the annexation of Hawai‘i, panelists will consider the following: What have been the legacies and ongoing effects of this “imperial archipelago”? How did the distinct but overlapping colonial practices of Spain and the United States shape social and cultural life? What has been the formal legal and political status of the Philippines, Guåhan (Guam), Cuba, Puerto Rico, Samoa, and Hawai‘i?

Call Her Ganda follows the fight for justice for Jennifer Laude, a Filipina trans woman who was murdered by a U.S. serviceman in 2014. The screening is co-sponsored by the NYU Center for the Study of Gender & Sexuality.

The symposium is co-sponsored by NYU Native Studies Forum, the NYU Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program in the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis.

Subways: R, W (8th Street), 6 (Astor Place), B, D, F, A, C, E (West Fourth Street)