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Keila Grinberg, Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations, on Slavery and International Conflicts in South America in the 19th Century—Feb. 27


Professor Keila Grinberg will deliver “Slavery, Illegal Enslavement and International Conflicts” on Tues., Feb. 27, 6:30 p.m. at NYU’s King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center (53 Washington Square South [betw. Sullivan and Thompson Streets].

Candido Lopez, Acampamento frente a Uruguaiana 1865

Professor Keila Grinberg will deliver “Slavery, Illegal Enslavement and International Conflicts” on Tues., Feb. 27, 6:30 p.m. at NYU’s King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center (53 Washington Square South [betw. Sullivan and Thompson Streets].

The event, free and open to the public, will be held in English, on a first come, first served basis.

About the lecture:
The causes of the Paraguay war (1864-1870) have been debated ever since the war ended, and remain controversial among historians. In this presentation, Grinberg will discuss the ways in which the presence of Brazilian slavery and the illegal enslavement of women and children on the border between Brazil and Uruguay affected international relations between the countries of the La Plata region in the nineteenth century, contributing fundamentally to the growing tensions that led to the beginning of the war. 

About Professor Grinberg:
Professor Keila Grinberg, Andrés Bello Chair Professor for Spring 2018, is a distinguished Brazilian historian whose main current field of research is the kidnapping and illegal enslavement on the southern Brazilian border and their larger effects on the making of South American international relations during the nineteenth century. With Hebe Mattos and Martha Abreu, she is currently directing the public digital history project Pasts Presents: memories of slavery in Brazil.

Grinberg is an Associate Professor of History at the Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO) and a researcher at the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq, Brazil).  She has been a visiting professor at Northwestern University (2009) and the University of Michigan (2011⁄2012), and a Tinker Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago (2015⁄2016)

Her milestone book “O fiador dos brasileiros: cidadania, escravidão e direito civil no tempo de Antonio Pereira Rebouças” (Civilização Brasileira, 2002) is currently being translated into English (UNC Press).

During her tenure as the Spring 2018 Andrés Bello Chair in Latin American Cultures and Civilizations, Grinberg will offer public lectures in English and organize the two-day symposium “Slave Pasts in the Present: Narrating Slavery through the Arts, Technology and Tourism”. She will also teach a graduate seminar entitled “Public History and the Memory of Slavery in Brazil and the United States”.

For more information, call 212.998.3650 or visit www.kjcc.org.
Subways: N, R, W (8th Street); 6 (Astor Place); A, B, C, D, E, F, M (West 4th Street).

Editor’s Note:
Since 1997, King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center of New York University has centered on increasing awareness of Spain and the Spanish-speaking world at NYU and fostering cultural and intellectual exchange. Having established itself with numerous well-received programs, it offers a wide array of lectures, conferences, readings, screenings, exhibitions, among different special events, with the aim of reaching a growing audience while deepening its commitment to its current constituency. For more, please visit www.kjcc.org.