“The Death of Free Speech on Campus?” NYU Historian Cohen Takes “Then and Now” Look in Feb. 15 Lecture


New York University historian Robert Cohen will deliver “The Death of Free Speech on Campus?”—a public lecture—on Wed., Feb. 15, 5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Jurow Lecture Hall.

"Freedom's Orator" by Robert Cohen
NYU historian Robert Cohen, author of "Freedom’s Orator: Mario Savio and the Radical Legacy of the 1960s", will deliver “The Death of Free Speech on Campus?”—a public lecture—on Wed., Feb. 15, 5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Jurow Lecture Hall.

New York University historian Robert Cohen will deliver “The Death of Free Speech on Campus?”—a public lecture—on Wed., Feb. 15, 5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Jurow Lecture Hall, Silver Center (100 Washington Square East/enter at 31 Washington Place).

This lecture, which will be followed by a question-and-answer session, will explore the state of free speech on campus as the media and critics report and distort it, as students experience it, and how it looks from a historical perspective. It will also consider ways that colleges and universities can enhance freedom of speech.

Cohen is a professor of history and social studies in the Department of Teaching and Learning at NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Cohen, who has an affiliated appointment in NYU’s Department of History, has authored or edited several works on the history of free speech on campus, including: Freedom’s Orator: Mario Savio and the Radical Legacy of the 1960s; The Essential Mario Savio: Speeches and Writings That Changed America; The Free Speech Movement: Reflections on Berkeley in the 1960s (co-edited with Reginald E. Zelnik); When the Old Left Was Young: Student Radicals and America’s First Mass Student Movement, 1929-1941Rebellion in Black and White: Southern Student Activism in the 1960s (co-edited with David Snyder); and Howard Zinn and the Spelman College Student Movement, 1963 (in press).   

The event, an NYU College of Arts and Science Bentson Dean’s Lecture, is free and open to the public. Admission is on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. Please call 212.998.8154 for more information. Subway Lines: 6 (Astor Place); N, R (8th Street).

Reporters wishing to attend the lecture must RSVP to James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu.
 

Press Contact

James Devitt
James Devitt
(212) 998-6808