positive/negative: HIV/AIDS features archival documents, correspondence, photographs, posters, clothing, art works, literature, and rare audiovisual material that cover both the emergence of and reception to AIDS.

positivenegative-hivaids-an-nyu-fales-library-exhibition-through-january-15-2016
Hunter Reynolds /Patina du Prey’s Memorial Dress. Photo: Maxine Henryson

Opening reception October 9, 2015 from 5pm-8pm

New York University’s Fales Library and Special Collections presents positive/negative: HIV/AIDS, an exhibition curated by Brent Phillips, Fales media archivist. positive/negative: HIV/AIDS is on display from October 12, 2015 through January 15, 2016, in the Tracey/Barry Gallery, Bobst Library, Third Floor, 70 Washington Square South, (at LaGuardia Place). [Subways A,C,E, B,D,M to West 4th Street; 6 line to Astor Place; R train to 8th Street.]. Gallery hours are: Monday – Friday 10 am – 5:30 pm.

Opening reception: Friday, October 9, 2015 from 5pm-8pm

Culled from the archives of the Fales Library, positive/negative: HIV/AIDS examines both the compassionate and the callous responses to the AIDS epidemic in America during the 1980s and 1990s, with specific relation to politics, education, faith, and the arts.

“Fales did not intentionally set out to document this epidemic,” said Phillips. “Inevitably, though, the archives that make up the Fales Downtown Collection reflect this violent disruption of imagination, the overwhelming loss, and the nearly unprecedented humanitarian achievement AIDS motivated. “

positive/negative: HIV/AIDS features archival documents, correspondence, photographs, posters, clothing, art works, literature, and rare audiovisual material that cover both the emergence of and reception to AIDS.

“The impact of AIDS proved devastating for the New York downtown arts scene in the 1980s and 1990s,” said Phillips. “Much of the historic record has emphasized the negative reactions that permeated the early years of AIDS. However, through all the malice and death, scores of people of all kinds banded together in a profound, positive manner, and this show of solidarity and hope comes across in the exhibition.”

Also on view: Patina Du Prey’s Memorial Dress by Hunter Reynolds, unrealized art conceptions by artist David Wojnarowicz, and selections from Bill Bytsura’s ACT-UP photograph collection.

 

About Fales Library and Special Collections:
The Fales Library, comprising nearly 358,000 volumes and over 10,000 linear feet of archive and manuscript materials, houses the Fales Collection of rare books and manuscripts in English and American literature, the Downtown Collection, the Marion Nestle Food Studies Collection, and the general special collections of the NYU Libraries. The Fales Collection was given to NYU in 1957 by DeCoursey Fales in memory of his father, Haliburton Fales. It is especially strong in English literature from the middle of the 18th century to the present, documenting developments in the novel. The Downtown Collection, founded in 1993, documents the downtown New York art, performance, and literary scenes from 1975 to the present and is extremely rich in archival holdings, including extensive film and video. The goal of the Downtown Collection is to comprehensively collect the full range of artistic practices and output of the Downtown scene, regardless of format. This research collection, built on a documentary strategy, supports the research of students and scholars interested in the intersection of the contemporary arts and other forms of cultural and artistic expression.

The NYU Division of Libraries is a global system comprising five libraries in Manhattan and one each in Brooklyn, Abu Dhabi and Shanghai. Its flagship, the Elmer Holmes Bobst Library on Washington Square, receives 2.6 million visits annually. For more information about the NYU Libraries, please visit http://library.nyu.edu


Untitled poster from the Group Material Archive, Fales Library


Untitled photo: David Wojnarowicz