Starting February 5, diverse and innovative works in photography, digital imaging, and multimedia by graduating seniors from the class of 2015 in the Department of Photography & Imaging will be on display in the first of a two part exhibition.

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Photo: Alexis Bynum, B.F.A. '15

The “movable feast” that is NYU Tisch just added another item to the menu. Starting February 5, diverse and innovative works in photography, digital imaging, and multimedia by graduating seniors from the class of 2015 in the Department of Photography & Imaging will be on display in the first of a two part exhibition. It will remain on view at New York University’s through March 12th, 2015.

Entitled SHOW ONE, the exhibition is the first of two shows that will eventually present the work of the entire graduating class in a BFA exhibition. The work will be installed in both the Gulf + Western Gallery at the rear lobby of the 1st floor, and the 8th Floor Gallery at 721 Broadway at Waverly Place.

This year’s show features work that is personal, political, and diverse in terms of both influence and technique. Sarah Anderson’s photographs depict New York’s Ukranian community in the wake of ongoing conflict. Nicolas Bloise explores the deception that permeates fantasy in a series of self portraits taken in hourly motel rooms. Alexis Bynum presents a selection of digitally distorted images of fashion models, addressing photographic authenticity in commercial photography.

Chloe Saint Etienne’s images of heirlooms were inspired by her grandmother's memory loss, and displayed as handkerchiefs. Ian Farrell’s interactive web-based presentation is inspired by his mother's figurine collection. Alexandra Gavillet uses 3-dimensional imaging technology to make abstractions of the human body in motion.

Elizabeth Ibarra’s cinematic images allow the viewer to imagine the context for each scene. Rachel Kaplan’s portraits of her Grandma Jeanne provide an uplifting perspective on aging. Moogy Seungwoo Kim’s photographs of Korean War veterans addresses collective memory and national identity.

Inspired by Mughal miniature painting, Sejal Kothari’s composite photographs critique representations of womanhood in contemporary Indian culture. Eric Lawton’s series solidifies the carnal and spiritual closeness experienced during intimacy through nostalgic color and ethereal light.

Molly Leon’s photographs function as a diary of her time on an Ayurvedic organic farm in Hawaii. Nicole Motta’s multimedia project is the exploration of private and public space using media screens as a viewfinder. Carolyn Panknin’s installation explores her upbringing as a Jehovah’s Witness. 

Caleb Savage’s documentary photo series addresses the history, complexity, and contradictions of Pennsylvania’s anthracite coal mining region. Melia Snodgrass’s poetry and photographs meditate on family, life, and color. Haley Weiss investigates mourning on social media in her installation pow pow the end.

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays, and noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is free. Photo identification is required for access to the building. For more information, visit www.photo.tisch.nyu.edu or call 212.998.1930.

The Department of Photography and Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts is a four-year B.F.A. program centered on the making and understanding of images. Students explore photo-based imagery as personal and cultural expression. Situated within New York University, the program offers students both the intensive focus of an arts curriculum and a serious and broad grounding in the liberal arts.

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Melia Snodgrass