Thomas Sugrue, who joins the NYU faculty as a professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis this summer, has been named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow.

Carnegie Fellows 2015
Thomas Sugrue, who joins the NYU faculty as a professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis this summer, has been named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow, one of 32 selected to the inaugural class of a fellowship program that provides support for scholars in the social sciences and humanities.

Thomas Sugrue, who joins the NYU faculty as a professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis this summer, has been named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow, one of 32 selected to the inaugural class of a fellowship program that provides support for scholars in the social sciences and humanities.

Each recipient will receive up to $200,000, which will enable them to devote between one and two years to research and writing. Sugrue’s research project is titled, “The U.S. Mortgage and Foreclosure Crisis in Historical Perspective: Real Estate, Finance, and Politics.”

“It is my hope that the work of the Andrew Carnegie Fellows will help inform the American public as well as policy makers,” said Vartan Gregorian, President of Carnegie Corporation.

Sugrue, who will also have an appointment in NYU's Department of History, is currently David Boies Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and an advisor to NYU’s Marron Institute of Urban Management.

“The Andrew Carnegie Fellows are an exceptional group of established and emerging scholars, journalists, and authors whose work distills knowledge, enriches our culture, and equips leaders in the realms of science, law, business, public policy, and the arts,” the Carnegie Corporation said in announcing the inaugural fellowship class.

Sugrue is the author of Not Even Past: Barack Obama and the Burden of Race and Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North. He has also written The Origins of the Urban Crisis and W.E.B. DuBois, Race, and the City: The Philadelphia Negro and its Legacy, among other works.

His newest book, These United States: A Nation in the Making, 1890 to the Present, co-authored with Glenda Gilmore of Yale University, will be published by W.W. Norton in October.

Other winning proposals from this year’s fellows address issues including policing and race, big data and privacy, the impact of an aging population, the safety of generic drugs, and how attitudes are formed among voters. The Corporation will award a total of $6.4 million to the inaugural class.