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Researchers Look to Reduce Hep C Infections With ‘Staying Safe Intervention’ for Injecting Drug Users

June 4, 2014

Despite a number of social/behavioral intervention and educational programs, the spread of hepatitis C (HCV) in people who inject drugs remains a chronic problem. Now researchers affiliated with the College of Nursing’s Center for Drug Use and HIV Research are focusing on intervention strategies that highlight the lesser-known dangers of HCV transmission through the sharing of other injection equipment such as cookers, filters, drug-dilution water, and water containers. 

Their article, “The Staying Safe Intervention: Training People Who Inject Drugs in Strategies to Avoid Injection-Related HCV and HIV Infection,” published in the journal AIDS Education and Prevention, explores the feasibility and efficacy of their “Staying Safe Intervention,” a strengths-based social/behavioral intervention conducted with small groups of people who inject drugs. The intervention is designed to facilitate long-term prevention of HIV and HCV.

“The Staying Safe Intervention seeks to reduce injection risk by intervening upstream in the causal chain of risk behaviors by modeling, training in, and motivating the use of strategies and practices of long-term risk avoidance,” says Pedro Mateu-Gelabert, the study’s principal investi-gator at the NYC-based National Development Research Institutes.

 

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