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Recent Nursing Graduates Are More Likely to Work in Nursing Homes Than Earlier Grads

June 4, 2014

Compared with six years ago, newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) have greater job commitment, but are more likely to work part-time, according to a study of newly licensed nurses conducted by the RN Work Project, a program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The research team compared a group of nurses licensed in 2004-2005 with a group licensed in 2010-2011 and found that those in the later cohort were less likely to work in hospitals, special care units, and direct care. They were more likely to work as managers, be enrolled in formal education programs, and have positive views of their work environments. The study recently appeared in the American Journal of Nursing.

Investigators for the study were Christine T. Kovner, professor at the NYU College of Nursing, the University at Buffalo’s Carol Brewer, NYU data analyst Farida Fatehi, and Boston College’s Carina Katigbak. Kovner and Brewer direct the RN Work Project.

The RN Work Project is a 10-year study of NLRNs that began in 2006. It is the only multi-state, longitudinal study of new nurses’ turnover rates, intentions, and attitudes—including satisfaction, organizational commitment, and preferences about work. The study draws on data from nurses in 34 states, covering 51 metropolitan areas and nine rural areas.

 

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