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Courant Faculty Win Dept. of Energy Early Career Awards

May 7, 2014

Antoine Cerfon and Miranda Holmes-Cerfon, assistant professors in NYU’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, have each received funding under the Department of Energy’s Early Career Research Program.

The two are among 35 scientists from across the nation selected by DOE’s Office of Science. The program, now in its fifth year, is designed to bolster the nation’s scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early career years, when many scientists do their most formative work, DOE said in announcing this year’s awardees.

“By supporting our most creative and productive researchers early in their careers, this program is helping to build and sustain America’s scientific workforce,” said Patricia M. Dehmer, acting director of DOE's Office of Science. “We congratulate this year’s winners on having competed successfully for these highly selective awards, and we look forward to following their accomplishments over the next five years.”

Under the program, university-based researchers will receive at least $150,000 per year to cover summer salary and research expenses. The research grants are planned for five years.
A list of this year’s awardees, their institutions, and titles of research projects is available on the Early Career Research Program webpage.
 

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Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Research

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