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Biologist Purugganan Named to Human Frontier Science Program’s Council of Scientists

January 9, 2014
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New York University biologist Michael Purugganan has been selected as the U.S. representative to the Human Frontier Science Program’s Council of Scientists, the organization announced.

Purugganan, NYU’s dean for science, was one of 14 scientists named by HFSP, which funds pioneering research in the life sciences and is implemented by the International Human Frontier Science Program Organization (HFSPO) based in Strasbourg, France.

As part of the Council of Scientists (COS), Purugganan will advise the HFSP Board of Trustees on a range of scientific and organizational matters, such as the evaluation of its current programs, the consideration of new ones, and the selection process for grants and fellowships. COS members are chosen based on their commitment to promoting international science as well as for their dedication to encouraging young scientists to pursue challenging problems.

Purugganan, the Dorothy Schiff Professor of Genomics and Professor of Biology at NYU, is a leading authority on plant molecular evolution and genomics. His has received an Alfred Sloan Young Investigator Award (1997–2002) and a Guggenheim Fellowship (2006–2007), among other honors. He was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2005 and, in 2011, was a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow of the Kavli Foundation and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

EDITOR’S NOTE:
The Human Frontier Science Program is an international program of research support implemented by the International Human Frontier Science Program Organization (HFSPO) based in Strasbourg, France. Its aims are to promote intercontinental collaboration and training in cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research focused on the life sciences. HFSPO receives financial support from the governments or research councils of Australia, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, UK, and the United States, as well as from the European Union. For more, please visit http://www.hfsp.org/.

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This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Arts and Science, Research, Faculty

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: James Devitt | (212) 998-6808

Biologist Purugganan Named to Human Frontier Science Program’s Council of Scientists

NYU biologist Michael Purugganan has been selected as the U.S. representative to the Human Frontier Science Program’s Council of Scientists. Purugganan, NYU’s dean for science, was one of 14 scientists named by HFSP, which funds pioneering research in the life sciences and is implemented by the International Human Frontier Science Program Organization (HFSPO) based in Strasbourg, France.


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