Neuroscientist Fenton on “Tracing, Erasing, and Harnessing Long-Term Memory”—Oct. 30


NYU neuroscientist André Fenton will deliver “Tracing, Erasing, and Harnessing Long-Term Memory,” a lecture on the biological process of memory, on Wed., Oct. 30.

Neuroscientist Fenton on “Tracing, Erasing, and Harnessing Long-Term Memory”—Oct. 30
NYU neuroscientist André Fenton, above, will deliver “Tracing, Erasing, and Harnessing Long-Term Memory,” a lecture on the biological process of memory, on Wed., Oct. 30, 4:30-5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) Auditorium.

New York University neuroscientist André Fenton will deliver “Tracing, Erasing, and Harnessing Long-Term Memory,” a lecture on the biological process of memory, on Wed., Oct. 30, 4:30-5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) Auditorium (12 Waverly Place, between Greene and Mercer Streets).

Memories are the imprints that experience leaves in the brain in defining knowledge, mental competence, and, in part, our individuality. However, this view is largely conceptual—we don’t yet understand memory as a biological entity or a process. But this is beginning to change. In the lecture, Fenton will explain how scientists are slowly discovering the biological basis of how experience changes brains and alters their function—breakthroughs that will eventually have a remarkable impact on our lives.

Fenton, a professor in NYU’s Center for Neural Science, is an internationally recognized neuroscientist and biomedical engineer. He works on three related problems: how brains store information in memory; how brains coordinate knowledge to selectively activate relevant information and suppress irrelevant information; and how to record electrical brain activity in freely moving subjects. His recordings of electrical brain activity are elucidating the physiology of cognitive control and cognitive dysfunction in diseases, including schizophrenia, depression, and mental retardation.

The lecture is part of NYU’s “Science on the Square,” a series of lectures focusing on scientific topics of interest to the general public and sponsored by NYU’s Dean for Science.

The lecture is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, call 212.998.3800. Reporters interested in attending must RSVP to James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu.

Subways: N/R [8th Street], 6 [Astor Place].

Press Contact

James Devitt
James Devitt
(212) 998-6808